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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2004) 34 (1): 173–196.
Published: 01 January 2004
..., our hero skilled in all ways of contending needs to disrobe and catch the king’s attention at the baths. The 176 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 34.1 / 2004 victim of disaster after disaster, a shipwrecked foreigner, he makes good by winning the king’s favor in the one public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 449–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
... English crown in Ire- land. I am interested in how these blood laws seep into the debate over nobility intrinsic to Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale. The divided and overlapping technologies of blood laws and pedagogy in this medieval example challenge us...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2001
... servant not found in the Ashburnham Penta- teuch, but found in a number of Roman mosaics, is the bath attendant. John Clarke’s recent work, which lends valuable insight into late Roman attitudes toward black figures in art, shows that depictions of macrophallic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 97–139.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., allegedly a slave who escaped from Süleyman’s court where he worked from 1532 to 1540, catalogues Turkish rituals, from eating habits to women going to the bath, rituals that he confirms, “I saw with these eyes.”36 The immutability of Ottoman attire became a topos that could be used as a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 41–58.
Published: 01 January 2002
... pam knewe; po pat were seke & lauht scathes, wesch pe stones, did it bathes; pat felt pam greued of grete pinges, bathed pam of pe self wasshynges & heled wele of per pyne, had pei non oper medicyne. (8692–703) [They (the stones) were planned and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2008) 38 (1): 119–145.
Published: 01 January 2008
... belt (poias and a sheep-skin coat (kozhukh). Other gifts given to Alexander seem earmarked for use during the ritualized cleansing bath on the morn- ing of the second day of the wedding: another fur coat (shuba), a kaftan (terlik), a light outer garment (opashen), a decorative collar (ozherel'e...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 437–460.
Published: 01 September 2017
..., especially in the Canterbury Tales.24 Though it is not invoked in his most sustained exploration of biblical exegesis, the Wife of Bath’s Prologue (dis- cussed below), the ordinatio of the glossed page does inform the biblicism of another Chaucerian exegete, Friar John of the Summoner’s Tale. At least...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... France alone in 1225; such rapid growth was in large part a response to Lateran III’s injunctions concerning the regulation of disease.8 The leprosarium was meant to segregate, not “cure,” although bathing in medicinal waters and other treatments were practiced. Still, isolation of the leper was...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 263–287.
Published: 01 May 2016
... Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Chaucer’s Wife of Bath opens her tale with a rape narrative. She introduces a “lusty bacheler,” a knight in King Arthur’s court who encounters a lone maiden and assaults her: On a day [he] cam ridynge from ryver, And happed that, allone as he was born, He...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2007) 37 (2): 335–371.
Published: 01 May 2007
... reestablish it. Spenser best describes this contradiction in Book 6, where he strategically transforms and appropriates a monarcho-populist tradition that extends at least as far back as Chaucer, whose Wife of Bath (or at least the “mayde” presented by her tale) argues simply and radically that “he is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 479–492.
Published: 01 September 2006
...: Conquest, Utopia, and the Wife of Bath’s Tale,” Texas Studies in Language and Litera- ture 44 (2002): 34 – 46; Louise O. Fradenburg, “The Wife of Bath’s Passing Fancy,” Studies in the Age of Chaucer 8 (1986): 31 – 58; Margaret Ferguson, Dido’s Daughters: Literacy, Gender, and Empire in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 375–406.
Published: 01 May 2009
... / Cockfighting as Cultural Allegory  387 as he went to move another cage, give another bath, or conduct another feeding. “We are all cock crazy.” Geertz then turns immediately to “some less visible dimensions” of the “madness” to which his landlord alludes, namely, the tensions between the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 147–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
... “to bathe, play games, or drink a pint of beer as young people are used to do.” Bruges was laced Arnade and Colwill / Crime and Testimony   149 with taverns, bathhouses, and brothels whose purposes often overlapped — a beehive of male sociability that serviced...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 431–448.
Published: 01 September 2000
... palimpsest of Spanish literature through The Wife of Bath’s Tale and on to the appropriation of medieval paradigms in the colonies themselves, in nineteenth-century Australia. Despite the variety of topics addressed, cer- tain common themes, already suggested by Petrarch...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2002
... bared bosoms”; in another case he has him “looking into the baths . . . [and] . . . abhorring such nudity” (30). These anecdotes, of course, merely represent the obverse of his obsession with looking: both imply a desire to regulate sexuality by means of the gaze. In psychoanalytic terms, this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 615–634.
Published: 01 September 2012
..., Bath and Wells, and Durham before being appointed bishop of Win- chester in 1501. The most significant difference separating the two was that Talavera was a professed religious (a Jeronimite monk) and Fox never entered a religious order. As will be demonstrated below, their careers and the religio...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 587–597.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Tompson is mentioned as a signet clerk and described as wise and experienced by the diplomat and future bishop of Bath and Wells, John Clerk, in his June 13, 1519 letter to Cardinal Wolsey.27 The 1542 inventory of the Royal Library at the Palace of Westminster lists several otherwise unidentified...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 251–291.
Published: 01 May 2011
... peculiarity of the Rules of Confraternity, which, for instance, does not mention the names of the participating monasteries. This vagueness espe- cially reveals itself when comparing the Rules to a similar, though later agree- ment in the Bath Chartulary, which contains seven lines listing the partici...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 575–599.
Published: 01 September 2000
... the logic of the tale. Cecilia, threatened with torture and death, says she “kan suffre it as a philosophre” (490), and she can, and better, since she lives through her immersion in a bath of flames for a day and a night. In a way (probably not intended by...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 197–228.
Published: 01 May 2008
... even literary characters. When the Wife of Bath, for example, claims to have been “as kynde” to her fifth husband “As any wyf from Denmark unto Ynde,” Chaucer expects her listeners to accept as commonplace this definition of the world’s geographi- cal reach.8 This passing remark, as it happens...