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authorial intention

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 519–543.
Published: 01 September 2023
... of the thoughts of another mind. Ultimately, it is the value of minds connecting with other minds that led medieval readers to care about authorial intention. pasnau@Colorado.EDU Copyright © 2023 by Duke University Press 2023 medieval textual hermeneutics semantics modern literary theory...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 597–622.
Published: 01 September 2023
...Eva von Contzen Chaucer criticism has always grappled with the question of intentionality. While early critics saw no trouble in identifying the voices in Chaucer's texts with the author's intention, authorial intention—not to be confused with autobiographical readings—became the elephant...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 573–596.
Published: 01 September 2023
...Sebastian Sobecki This article takes issue with medievalists’ curated textual practices that coalesce on codicological intentionalism , that is, the implied position of (re)constructing authorial intention through the study of manuscripts and handwriting. Rather than criticize this practice...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 623–640.
Published: 01 September 2023
... intention. patrick.durdel@unil.ch Copyright © 2023 by Duke University Press 2023 Jasper Heywood early modern English translation Senecan tragedy authorial intention evaluative judgment We must, perhaps, imagine the scene of translation as one of material contact. Jasper Heywood...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 467–492.
Published: 01 September 2023
...Alastair Minnis Scholastic intentionalism was a complicated and hardly consistent affair. Theologians sought security of meaning in the principle that a biblical author's intention could be found in the literal sense of his text. But the ultimate author of scripture, God, could have inscribed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 545–571.
Published: 01 September 2023
...Stefan Jurasinski Celebrated by a generation of literature scholars, lamented by E. D. Hirsch, the disappearance of the author and authorial intentions as means of interpretation has a history with branches in the study of pre-Conquest England. Long before the twentieth century, Anglo-Saxon...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 451–465.
Published: 01 September 2023
...James Simpson Almost every interpretative university discipline in or adjacent to the Humanities makes routine, unproblematic appeal to intention as an interpretative move. By proscribing intentionalism as an instrument of interpretation, Literary Criticism is the outlier among adjacent and not so...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (2): 215–239.
Published: 01 May 2003
... dismiss authorial intention and prefer to work instead within interpretative frameworks generated by hypo- stases such as, say, Power or Textuality. The antihumanist hermeneutic schools of the twentieth century repudiated authorial intentionalism, hav- ing lost faith in individual persons as sources...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 493–518.
Published: 01 September 2023
... of ascertaining the sin's gravity and assigning an appropriate level of penance. In this sense, confessors’ strategies for discerning intent resonate with literary interpretative strategies for accessing authorial intent. Namely, the fact that “I can never know another person's intended meaning with certainty...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 283–303.
Published: 01 May 2009
... concern with retrieving authorial intent is particularly ill suited. Because of their unusual production history, these romances are better served by an alternative approach to textual study, one infused with poststructuralist emphases on decentralization and variation, as has been offered...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2016
... to be offered.2 A crucial question in medicine (similar to questions about authorial intent and reader response) relates to whose interpretation should be prioritized — doctor’s or patient’s? Both are “reading” the body and the mind of the sufferer, but with different vantage points, presumptions...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 33–52.
Published: 01 January 2020
..., arguing that the channels through which women s texts were read and their authorial reputations were disseminated are central to understanding not only how, what, and where women wrote, but also how their texts found audiences and the ways in which female authorship was imagined. This article builds upon...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 41–64.
Published: 01 January 2004
... of canonesses, was dependent upon the Saxon royal court and its support. As a canoness, she did not enjoy the comparative independence in her authorial choice of secular topics that the laywoman Christine de Pizan could exploit. Another impediment to her development as a courtly writer was her lack...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 507–560.
Published: 01 September 2001
... and the historical meaning of her own religion. What did Chaucer know? But what of the teller behind the teller? Is Chaucer also ignorant? To evade the question of authorial intention is to avoid the moral force of the issue, to avoid the consequences of literary practice by retreating into the often foggy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (3): 657–698.
Published: 01 September 2012
..., began to innovate. Ever since Vasari, this assumption that medieval art was governed by a substitu- tional model of production rather than an authorial one — that is, by the desire to imitate previously existing art, thereby effectively just replacing it, rather than to create and call attention...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 375–399.
Published: 01 May 2000
... to Marotti, the appearance of random dis- organization that Marcus values is actually an intentional blind—the result of a conscious attempt to “protect the reputation of Dean Donne from moral taint.”3 376 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 30.2 / 2000 However, this ingenious...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 283–312.
Published: 01 May 2001
... for definitive allegorical meaning and authorial intention. “The Earl of Cork’s Lute,” in Spenser’s Life and the Subject of Biography, 167–69. 33 D. M. Loades, “The Theory and Practice of Censorship in Sixteenth-Century England,” Transactions of the Royal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (2): 287–321.
Published: 01 May 2023
... seem to resolve themselves into some epic authorial statement about the principled aims and effects of his literary output, achieving what David Carlson has called “monumentalizing auto-epitaphery.” 4 Most recently, Joyce Coleman has surveyed the evidence to conclude that both picture and poem...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 505–518.
Published: 01 September 2000
... to his Muslim alterego. I intentionally associate here the name of Cervantes with the Supreme Creator, since he would seem to have the last word in this plenti- ful work in which he so frequently disputes with Cide Hamete the author- ship of the text...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 545–554.
Published: 01 September 2016
..., a reflex of the Reformation and a way of dealing with the schism and violence produced by the Reformation. Reformation theologians, that is, may have been theologi- cally well-­intentioned, but their schismatic disputes produced unsustainable violence within European societies. That appalling...