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audience reception

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 1–12.
Published: 01 January 2020
.... But if this is the first port of call, such analysis quickly draws in questions about the relationship between reception and production, audience and agency, about contemporary and posthumous reputation. This special issue investigates the ways in which the act of reception is a reiterative process on a continuous...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 565–586.
Published: 01 September 2020
... to Moscow. The manuscripts show how a battle over diplomatic ceremony and honor unfolded into disputes over the forms and decorum used in a lively exchange of diplomatic letters and written complaints. These texts were edited, translated, and published for English and international audiences by another...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 431–451.
Published: 01 September 2021
... dialogue form print and performativity audience reception In the early 1530s, two of the foremost legal minds of sixteenth-century England engaged in a bitter print controversy over the subject of reform. Christopher St. German, one of the first vernacular expositors of English law, sparred...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 17–40.
Published: 01 January 2022
...—and in so doing, restored suspense to the experience of Doomsday. Copyright © 2022 by Duke University Press 2022 Old English Christ III Doomsday catastrophe metrical form hypermeter audience reception We are now having a very innocent little chat. Let us suppose that there is a bomb...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
... scene, which seems amorphously set in at least two cities, or materially, as in As You Like It, where the banquet in the forest seems to be onstage while Orlando and Adam are wandering around, starving. These examples from Dessen suggest an early audience receptive to spatial suggestion and lay...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 25–48.
Published: 01 January 2013
... space are partly verbal but partly physical. Performative space and receptive space would seem, by contrast, to be totally physical. By deferring them until the end I hope to demonstrate that they are anything but that. For the race of beings that included Shakespeare and his original audiences...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (1): 1–8.
Published: 01 January 2021
... of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Pilgrimage and Textual Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Production, Exchange, Reception, focuses on the production, exchange, and reception of such pilgrimage texts. The production of pilgrimage texts is the focus of essays by Chris- tine Gadrat...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (3): 597–622.
Published: 01 September 2023
... cues, our reading of the Canterbury Tales begins with Chaucer, the flesh-and-blood poet Chaucer, who invites his audience to join him in the fiction of the Canterbury pilgrimage and its story-telling contest. Of course “there is a spatio-temporal gap between the production and the reception...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 531–547.
Published: 01 September 2007
... construction for much of the sixteenth century, Chester’s mobile cyclic text is rendered still more multivalent when we consider how condi- tions of the Tudor Whitsun plays’ performance — processionally over three days, at five different stations, for socially heterogeneous audiences — could fracture...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 139–159.
Published: 01 January 2020
... in the mid-seventeenth, before being rediscovered within a limited academic context. This essay, however, finds value in charting the circulation and reception of this apparently “unpopular” and “outdated” work. Focusing on how Sidney’s Arcadia was published, refashioned, and read in the eighteenth century...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (1): 137–167.
Published: 01 January 2019
... classical underworld. The French critic Jean-Louis Guez de Balzac censured Heinsius on two accounts: first, for mingling sacred and profane figures in a tragedy based on scripture; and second, for expecting audiences to understand the historical complexity of his depiction of Herod’s dream. Balzac...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 251–282.
Published: 01 May 2001
... not only by the incidents they comprise, but also by the kind of rhetorical occasion they present—and the rhetorical occasion includes not only the event but also the writer, the writer’s purpose and intentions, and the writer’s audience.2 The audience...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 January 2020
... modern life writing, particularly in domestic contexts. Teresa’s autobiographical texts were mediated for new audiences: religious orders and lay readers, both Catholic and Protestant. Teresa quickly established cult status in large part through readers’ engagement with the record of her life. Analysis...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 245–286.
Published: 01 May 2015
... its scholarly and “popular” reception, with attention to the musical settings by Carl Orff. Preliminary to a three-volume edition of the Carmina Burana being prepared for Oxford University Press, the study seeks to distinguish the main issues for future research and to stimulate interdisciplinary...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 483–501.
Published: 01 September 2022
... only bodily, which is to say, not completely. What More describes as “spiritual” reception in the Treatise on the Passion becomes in Blessed Body explicitly “virtual” reception, and this shift in terminology is telling. Receiving virtually emphasizes that transubstantiation endows the Eucharistic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 33–52.
Published: 01 January 2020
...Rosalind Smith This essay builds upon work surrounding reception and the figure of the early modern woman writer to examine textual instances in which women’s writing has been “found” or manufactured: where writing falsely or tenuously attributed to historical women was circulated under...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 161–180.
Published: 01 January 2020
... recently researchers have been exploring ways of bringing these two ends of the digital spectrum into closer conversation. This article explores the study of readership and reception of pre-Victorian women’s writing through these emerging digital methods, examining two collections ( Women Writers Online...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 125–151.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Cynthia Klestinec This essay describes the reception of Vesalius’s illustrations of skeletons in Latin and Italian surgery texts in the sixteenth century. The skeletons were part of a visual archive that was produced collaboratively by humanists, editors, translators, and printers. Joining older...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 609–631.
Published: 01 September 2020
... published at the time of Bodin s visit to England and extensively used by Shakespeare in Henry V. Act 1 of the play starts with the Archbishop of Canterbury s exegesis of the Salic Law to Henry, justifying the English claim to the throne of France. The discourse acts as a preamble to the reception...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... of marital bliss, disrupted by the Faerie King, that Orfeo and Heurodis present (121–32, 153–78). 68 Cf. Kennedy, “Rex Inutilis,” 107–9: “the sympathy for Edward [following his removal in 1327] would have created an audience likely to be receptive to a romance dealing sympathetically...