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animal and human relationships

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 323–342.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., which held that all animal and plant life will perish after the Last Judgment and not be part of the promised “new heaven and new earth,” Bradford argues that creation in its entirety—not just humanity—will joyously be freed from the suffering it has endured since the Fall...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 253–284.
Published: 01 May 2022
... and their relationship to the animal and human world. Examples of gendered stones include the “echites”: [Y] a male et femele et pour ce les treuve l'en deux et deux dedens les nis des aigles et sans ces pierres les aigles ne puent faire leurs faons. Le male de ces pierres reluist un pou et est dur et la femelle est...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (2): 371–397.
Published: 01 May 2024
... and human relationships Several prominent scholars in early modern literary studies have argued that hybrid bodies—those that are neither human nor beast but perpetually somewhere “in-between”—were understood as “unnatural,” abject, and therefore “monstrous.” Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, Dana Oswald...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... threat to subjectivity itself by calling into question the preexisting relationship of the human soul to the human body. Much as a metempsychotic Shylock would not be exactly animal or human, but rather an entombment of one within the other, Faustus would not be exactly dead or alive, but trapped...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
... began in perception psychology, and he coined the term ecological optics to define the way in which animal perception, including the habits of the human animal, is ambient and tangible, a constant multisensory “keeping-­ in-­touch with the world.”9 Although the ground affords locomotion...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 443–465.
Published: 01 September 2008
... breezes” which “moderate the heats.” He added, linking the health of humans with that of plants and animals, that the breezes “invigorate every thing that grows, so they give both to man and beast at the same time their health and refreshment.”18 There was, however, a problem. According...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 585–615.
Published: 01 September 2014
... also profoundly shape human response, its materiality can pervade spaces far from its original locale, and it can engage in sophisticated theo- logical problems. Animate nature does not have to be “in nature,” wherever that may be.73 “Ecology permeates all forms,” writes Tim Morton, striving...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 397–429.
Published: 01 September 2021
... buff on fol. 70v to the elaborated violence of a blind quartet encountering a sow on fol. 74v. The begging blind man on fol. 77v is pictured twice in cooperative relationship with another animal, his dog. Although no other humans are shown, the begging bowl clearly indicates his dependence upon them...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 567–591.
Published: 01 September 2022
... relationship between humans and animals in preindustrial pastoralism. Oikeiôsis becomes ecology as Corin, whose name subsists between “care” and “cure,” attends to human nature in concert with ovine nature. Although The Praise of Folly does not directly address abuses of hospitality, the Book...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 579–594.
Published: 01 September 2007
... in aesthetic understanding. Children, medieval and Renaissance pedagogues constantly note, need not just moral instruction, spiritual inspiration, or social monitoring. They need to see the beauty in the world; need to distinguish between human artifice Journal of Medieval and Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 225–255.
Published: 01 May 2009
... forms plants, animals, minerals, and humans; she supervises generative behavior; she instructs philosophers on the varieties of natural phenomena.15 But although she wields great power over physi- cal creation, Natura is autonomous from it as an authority, and not caught up in it. Similarly, Hugh...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 January 2012
...; and by that fullness, his moral and supernatural acts were unfailingly good and fully pleasing to God. This is why Jesus is the model for authentic behavior, the great human exemplar who shows what is pos- sible for those who are in correct relationship to God, who indicates in his own action how they might act...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (2): 399–423.
Published: 01 May 2024
...’ stone for knowledge, perfecting and preserving mankind's arts and sciences. Maier compares paper to the phoenix and the philosophers’ stone because it is chymistry's greatest achievement, revolutionizing how humans create and share knowledge. By recognizing paper's relationship to both...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 395–418.
Published: 01 May 2015
... Aristotle’s definition of a human being as a political animal (“zoon politikon”) goes beyond the merely instru- mental view that humans need other humans in order to survive. Human beings are political animals in every aspect of their nature: acquiring the vir- tues and flourishing as a wise person...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 241–262.
Published: 01 May 2021
... moment in the arbitration of human affairs. This emphasis, in turn, bespeaks a broader concern over the timing of sacred icons during significant moments in Byzantine history as understood by contemporary chroniclers: namely, their failure to act in appropriate ways at critical moments when the empire...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 375–406.
Published: 01 May 2009
... are conflicting systems of meaning that at once affirm and disrupt anthropological distinctions between human and animal activity and the anthropocentric ideologies that construct such demarcations. Reading the early modern cockfight challenges us to critique how we engage sport, early modern culture, animals...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 513–543.
Published: 01 September 2016
... that would enable some analytical (and terminological) precision, Gregory traffics in general- izations or, more accurately, stereotypes. Where one might have expected to find substantive arguments with contemporaries who have written thought- fully on the many topics he touches on — the relationship...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 165–201.
Published: 01 January 2024
... with critical skepticism. This was a time when the Great Chain of Being was being examined in terms of continuities among different species, putting under new light the relation between humans and animals—one of the fundamental aspects of physiognomy. 18 Georges-Louis Leclerc, better known as the Count...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 33–59.
Published: 01 January 2016
... as the dwelling place of the soul and the source of the body’s life, it was the privi- leged site of relationships between body and soul, affect and cognition, self and other, human and God. In speaking about it, medical writers, natural philosophers, preachers, and poets blended the discourses of physiology...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 233–262.
Published: 01 May 2016
...: Environmental Meaning and Environmental Humanities,” in Re-imagining­ Nature, 1 – 41, uses an ecosemiotic approach to show how the self is created in dialogue with its environment. See also Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, “Introduction: All Things,” in Animal, Vegetable, Mineral, 1 – 8. 5...