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animal and human dissection

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 105–124.
Published: 01 January 2018
... of the cornerstones of the anatomical revolution. As anatomists dissect away, ever more convinced of the importance of using their own hands, the complexities of the physiology of the human hand are revealed to them. This essay focuses on Andreas Vesalius’s exploration of the mysteries of the human hand. In his work...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 61–78.
Published: 01 January 2018
... recorded their professors’ often quite critical assessment of Vesalius and his achievements. Copyright © 2018 Duke University Press 2018 Andreas Vesalius and his successors early modern anatomical education animal and human dissection student notebooks medical discoveries...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Valeria Finucci In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body , which delved inside the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based on what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 41–59.
Published: 01 January 2018
... in dissection is more extensive and more sophisticated than in Guinter’s original. The posi- tion of the omentum is often different in men from in monkeys; the caecum in dormice has a remarkable capacity; and the liver in reptiles takes up much of the left side. In humans, unlike in animals, the lung can...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 79–104.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Jennifer F. Kosmin Although Vesalius, like his contemporaries, had only extremely limited opportunities to examine or dissect the human gravid uterus, it is the image of the anatomist laying bare the (un)pregnant female body and revealing its secrets that graces the title page of the 1543 edition...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
... of Mondino de Liuzzi, who taught at the University of Bologna in the early fourteenth century and was the first instructor known to systematically dissect a human body in a public dem- onstration.7 Additionally, Italian medical writers composed at least eleven 154  Journal of Medieval and Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 125–151.
Published: 01 January 2018
... writers, including Galen, but Fioravanti’s construction coupled that image with human vivisection or, as it was called back then, the anat- omy or dissection of living humans.2 A more anxious conception, human as well as animal vivisection was associated with the ancient writers Herophilus (335...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 93–115.
Published: 01 January 2011
... rebellion. There is an eerie resemblance between the body in De Bry’s engrav- ing depicting human sacrifice and those depicting anatomical dissection 108 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 41.1 / 2011 such as the title page of Vesalius’s De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543). We see...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2015
... ninety nails to shut the casket properly on all sides. He then had it wrapped to make it impermeable and had it covered with animal hide for further safe- keeping. And so the dead and the living traveled together for the next five years until the musician reached Rome in 1626 and was able...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 33–59.
Published: 01 January 2016
... and other, human and God. In speaking about it, medical writers, natural philosophers, preachers, and poets blended the discourses of physiology, phi- losophy, and theology, highlighting the substantial interpenetration between these fields of knowledge and practice. Few texts dramatize this interpene...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2006) 36 (3): 619–642.
Published: 01 September 2006
... of homosexual relationships, and many other social goods are threatened by a newly revived proclivity for locating the roots of human personality and behavior analogically in ethology and reproductive biology. One might almost wish in this context for a return to bees as utopian animals: at least...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 509–531.
Published: 01 September 2021
... or reproducing their methods has particular utility. Medical polemicists, for example, attempted to dissect the mountebank conceptually and systematically so that readers who might one day become mountebanks’ audience members could recognize (and perhaps avoid) both the performer before them and the repertoire...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 293–321.
Published: 01 May 2020
... form.9 Taking a cue from these studies, I propose that there is something to be gained from considering the decapitated head or at least, some decapi- tated heads as a form of artifice. This artifice emerges in the the latter part of a sequence in which a given collection of material (a human head...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 413–442.
Published: 01 September 2008
... that made the scheme of ideal harmony so influential in writings on medicine. Galen summarizes: “the elements from which the world is made are air, fire, water and earth; the seasons from which the year is composed are spring, summer, winter and autumn; the humors from which animals and humans...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., their semi-­witting deep embeddedness. So microhistory, like any history, springs from an encounter between sources (papers, works of art, buildings, spaces, assorted other relics both human and natural) and their interpreters’ own later times — with their hermeneutical practices and habits...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 175–210.
Published: 01 January 2001
... Reader: Selections from the Medieval French Arthurian Cycle. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, vol. 1770. New York: Garland, 2000. xviii, 430 pp. Paper $19.95. Luther, Martin. Annotierungen zu den Werken des Hieronymus. Edited by Martin Brecht...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 343–374.
Published: 01 May 2002
... As much as the Greeks in their verse Sang about the forest on Erymanthus.] The first verse is dissected in the middle by a time line, signaled by the very Ronsardian transition “autant que”: what is above it belongs to the present moment of composition, and what is below, to the past moment...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 5–40.
Published: 01 January 2000
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 241–280.
Published: 01 May 2014
... by which they rejected the eclectic and heterogeneous phenomenon we call paganism for a monotheistic religion centered upon the redemptive act of sacrifice performed by a god who took human form for the sake of mankind. Christianization was achieved by a combination of spontaneous enthusiasm...