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almanac

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (2): 419–443.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Laura Williamson Ambrose This article focuses on almanac travel diaries, exploring both how and why seventeenth-century English readers used books of time as books of space. It seeks to broaden studies in early modern travel writing by examining the unique, nonnarrative marginalia that typify the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (3): 679–681.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Michael Cornett, Managing Editor Duke University Press Durham, North Carolina 2013 Volume 43 Index Ambrose, Laura Williamson Travel in Time: Local Travel Writing and Seventeenth-Century English Almanacs  419 – 443...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 91–123.
Published: 01 January 2003
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 523–542.
Published: 01 September 2015
... to be cut out, the diagrams sewn with a center stitch to their proper places in the book. As with stitched bindings, however, an imperative to sew in producing these books could translate to tactical and varied forms of sewing among consumers. An early printed almanac at the Folger...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 293–316.
Published: 01 May 2011
... the Calender and Abigail Shinn’s work on the poem’s generic relationship to the almanac also emphasize its resemblance to Renaissance reconfigurations of medieval texts.16 Yet any critic hoping to explain Spenser’s method solely by reference to an originary moment located in Middle English...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 359–390.
Published: 01 May 2017
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 339–374.
Published: 01 May 2000
... his head across there; He had rather see the devil; for this he says, He ne’er grew up so tall with fasting-days. I would not, for the price of all my almanacs, The guard had took him there, they’d ha’ beat out His brains with bombards. I bade him stay till Lent...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 5–40.
Published: 01 January 2000