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alien

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 545–571.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Shannon McSheffrey St. Martin le Grand, a precinct within the walls of London, was both a sanctuary and a liberty: it offered asylum to accused felons, and it allowed immigrant craftsmen to work and sell within its bounds despite London’s strict restrictions on alien labor. St. Martin’s privileges...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 413–442.
Published: 01 September 2008
... thousand years ago, might solve their suffering here and now. Yet they wouldn't dream of seeking succor in the works of Galen. Why? How have the beliefs and practices that guided Western medicine up through the eighteenth century come to seem, paradoxically, more alien and distant than ancient Chinese...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2002) 32 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2002
... to the Crown is how this loss of power affects the domestic sphere; for it suggests that there are rights and properties in the king’s domestic sphere which are now gov- erned by the public notion of the Crown—by the king’s inability to alien- ate certain rights and properties from himself. This...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 573–597.
Published: 01 September 2013
... loss and alienation. A similar promise undergirds material culture studies’ desire for tactile contact with the past. Like Ralph, this desire adheres to a belief in what Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass term “material memory”: the conviction that memory is materialized in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... modern era, in book four of his Enneads. He stresses to the reader that the soul is separate from the self “not in a spatial way” but rather in its “alienation in relation to the body.”2 Plotinus, in delicately parsing near-­synonyms, is worried that his advice to keep the soul separate could be...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 59–84.
Published: 01 January 2002
... gigantic sons of Albina, among others. For many medieval writers, Gog and Magog functioned as typological metaphors, names that could be appropriated to whatever was alien, threat- ening, or actively hostile in a manner that paralleled biblical usage. Since their earliest appearances in written...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 369–391.
Published: 01 May 2011
... alienation from that cosmos. By turning these tensions inside out, and by reformulating the reflexive relationships by which allegory binds the soul to the cosmos at large, Skelton in the Bowge remakes allegory as a poetry of solitude and self-­regard. This remaking, I argue, constitutes an...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2006) 36 (3): 517–537.
Published: 01 September 2006
... the European image of Japan had become less fanciful, it had not become any less exotic. The Japanese, remarkably, combined obvious cultural and political sophis- tication with values and tastes utterly alien to Europe’s own expectations and sensibilities. One keen observer of Japanese culture...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 493–518.
Published: 01 September 2002
... experience, as the above description of the Essex tippler’s operation suggests, was also radically “other.” Community and family connote familiarity, wholeness, and stability. The alehouse, while partially partaking of these qualities, was at the same time alien, fragmentary, and unsettled: in a word...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2013) 43 (3): 473–485.
Published: 01 September 2013
... production and the alienation of labor.1 On the one hand, indepen- dent makers of food, clothing, and furniture are reviving small-­scale pro- duction methods and marketing to self-­conscious, mostly urban consumers. In a related development, one sees the term artisan applied to everything from Dunkin...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 577–610.
Published: 01 September 2004
... toward a powerful other: “Greek freedom of thought is 582 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 34.3 / 2004 excited by an alien existence; but it is free because it transforms and virtually reproduces the stimulus by its own operation” (Phil. Hist., 238). As such, there is no dialectic...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 January 2016
... “flare up and down” and “only become significant when the relation of an alienated sub-­group to the social whole becomes an acute political issue,” and invok- Healy / Medicine, Metaphor, and “Crisis” in the Social Body  127 ing Durkheim’s notorious assertion that “Society...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 293–316.
Published: 01 May 2011
... that faced by those who do not recognize Spenser’s diction as English, “Whose first shame is, that they are not ashamed, in their own mother tonge straungers to be counted and alienes,” E.K. rather cryptically remarks (Epistle, 16). E.K.’s lament for the fact that many Spen- serian readers are...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 549–576.
Published: 01 September 2004
... production. (116) This inwardnesss is itself transformed by modernity, as the subject becomes more and more alienated from the rationalized world, leading up to the cri- sis of art that Adorno perceives at his own, post-Auschwitz moment.15 Map- ping Weber’s thesis about inwardness onto the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2007) 37 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2007
... England’s relationship to other cultures. Of course, the drama was in no way a factual account or accurate representation of alien lands and peoples, but it served to mediate and give cultural form to the cross-cultural transactions and alien identities that were affecting the English sense of place...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 193–198.
Published: 01 January 2017
... – 92. 6 Ibid., 168. 7 Ibid., 175. 8 Ibid., 168. See Sanjay Subrahmanyam’s Three Ways to Be Alien: Travails and Encoun- ters in The Early Modern World (Waltham, Mass.: Brandeis University Press, 2011); and Courtly Encounters: Translating Courtliness and Violence in Early Modern...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... Saracen a hybridization of misogyny and racism through a triple confluence of representations: the wild woman, personified vice, and “death itself, la mort, feminized through grammatical gender.”48 Michael Uebel has argued that because Islam was an alien presence...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... vulnerable to masculine fantasies, which, because they ren- der her an abstraction, alienate her from the looks, gestures, and deeds she is expected to enact. Moreover, as Troilus demonstrates, the intensity of private affection is always secondary to its public performance. No matter if Cressida is...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 233–262.
Published: 01 May 2016
... entangled with the very landscape that he seeks to control. Perceforest sees his mental illness vividly expressed in a chaotic and unmanaged forest, while Gallafur envisions his own body as an alien assemblage of disparate objects similar to a tree. This essay examines Perceforest’s portrayal...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., far more than most other studies, intimate with its subject, but history’s intimacy, so different from fiction’s swift, sweet, even cloying embrace, is always alien, even alienating. One of microhistory’s eternal lessons is bittersweet failure —  both the writer’s and the reader’s — ever to...