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aesthetics of incompleteness

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (2): 221–244.
Published: 01 May 2024
.... All rights reserved. Petrarch poetics aesthetics of incompleteness fragments and ruins writing practice When Francesco Petrarch reflects on his philosophy of writing, he seeks advice not only in classical authors such as Seneca and Cicero, but also in the working habits of ancient...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 119–145.
Published: 01 January 2022
... and Wastoure is no exception. Although it opens with an allusion to Doomsday, it is unlikely that the complete poem would actually have continued that far. 4 In this lucid explanation of Wynnere and Wastoure 's incomplete eschatology, the often vague distinction between apocalypse and prophecy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 453–467.
Published: 01 September 2007
... Nietzsche, Paul de Man stresses modernity’s “desire to wipe out whatever came earlier,” a sup- pression of anteriority so extreme that representation limits itself to the present.7 For Jürgen Habermas, the project of modernity, still incomplete, originates in a “radicalized consciousness . . . which...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 561–584.
Published: 01 September 2001
... years, but beyond the capacity of any Christian to fathom. In its very incompleteness, then, and even in its aesthetic inade- quacy, the poem offers a formal version of the stuttering inability to respond to Christ’s sacrifice that concludes Herbert’s “The Thanksgiving,” or of the willed avoidance...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 469–502.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., The St. Giles’s Hospital Processional (also known as the Wormald Processional, from its prior owner, Francis Wormald) is com- posed of 137 folios, each measuring 212 x 140 mm. The manuscript, now incomplete, details the minutiae of processional liturgies.11 Accompanying liturgical spoken and sung...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 493–510.
Published: 01 September 2007
... redefines this “pan-Iberian aesthetic”: from its early-medieval origin as a mediatory practice that helped to ensure the cultural survival of a multi-ethnic society, Mudéjar art (comprised of objects, structures, building techniques, and even modes and manners) traveled...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2002
... and cultural identities are manipulated by aesthetic, academic, economic, or political appropriations, the consequences can be disquieting or painful.”14 Accord- ing to this concept of “appropriation,” the model is always a relationship between cultural unequals—a dominant culture that appropriates...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 345–371.
Published: 01 May 2008
..., California. objects) that, with all due caution, might be called “aesthetic.” We may at least surmise that sixteenth-century printers took the trouble to purchase and use fonts of flowers because, beyond their technical uses, they were felt to be beautiful.In a previous essay, “How to Look...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 1–12.
Published: 01 January 2012
... to demonstrate an ongoing pre- occupation with the problem of recognition, now heightened aesthetically through the use of disguise. Here, she argues, we see how moral discernment is challenged in new ways by ethical strains created by market relations. Money, Beckwith notes, has the power “to recalibrate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 219–243.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., in theory, be adopted by any speaker of the charm. What is more, the prose passages at the start and close of the charm function presumably as silent instructions for that person who adopts the “I” and utters the metrical incantation. Hence, there are cer- tain gaps in this text and an incompleteness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 223–247.
Published: 01 May 2010
... is, paradoxically, incomplete. As an imprint that requires the artist’s subsequent activity, the image left behind on the panel is a marker of absence, or at least the vestige of a partial presence, which it is the artist’s task to flesh out in the full. In other words, the appearance of the prototype...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 519–545.
Published: 01 September 2000
... of a quest for identity—provincial, national, aesthetic, religious, and political.”6 As I aim to demonstrate, Dellheim’s claim certainly can be observed in the speeches of Sydney’s first professors, who frequently employed Victorian notions of medieval culture to frame a series...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 125–151.
Published: 01 January 2018
... instruments of medicine, but he also casts them as incomplete, as waiting, in a certain sense, for Hippocrates, “a man first and foremost worthy to be remembered, notable both for professional skill [techne, ars] and for eloquence [facundia], who separated this branch of learning [i.e., medicine] from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 375–399.
Published: 01 May 2000
..., the version of Donne projected by the 1633 Poems con- firms not only her deconstructivist principles but also her aesthetic taste more generally. In her words, the collection is a striking melange of sacred and secular that refuses to separate John Donne from Jack. Verse epistles . . . jostle...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 7–35.
Published: 01 January 2010
... followers reject “aesthetics” (19), despise the Christian faith, and worse: they worship Darwin. Hardison’s malediction on the Darwinism of early drama studies has won him lasting fame in the field, though this has required his champi- ons to forget, along with his critique of historicism...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 143–177.
Published: 01 January 2003
... or a given aesthetic theory), I will discuss here the emergence of the garden in relation to the waning of what can be called an emblematical epistemology and the emergence, in its place, of the scientific. In the middle of the seventeenth century, and in the garden work- ing and garden writing of men...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
..., dying, and deadly maidens of late medieval culture to a collection of develop- ments, still incompletely identified, that set the cultural stage for the con- nection of witchcraft with women. Barbara Newman has laid out for us the development by the thirteenth century of an ever- closer association...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 335–371.
Published: 01 May 2007
... of techniques and profits. But the estates debate persisted in Tudor England as a way to address three intermeshed and incomplete transitions, one political, one religious, and one economic. First, Henry Tudor staged a successful baronial coup in 1485, turning a dispersed feudal state...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... — was a key feature of ingenium, which together with reason formed the “higher part of the soul”; without it, one would not be able “to understand . . . the cognitive, aesthetic, and practical-­moral func- tion of ingenium [or] to attain to inventive creativity.”33 Similitude served a wide range...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 147–173.
Published: 01 January 2022
... itself was apparently incomplete despite its appearance of closure, which itself prompts yet another couplet of commentary. The reader's own interpretive action is not so much satirized as replicated and trapped inside of this metaleptic sequence, thus preventing the reader from accomplishing any...