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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., using the example of Mankind , this essay examines how the actor, seen as engaged in both collaborative and competitive play, can illuminate certain strategies in Shakespeare's work. Examples drawn from Richard III, Twelfth Night, Much Ado about Nothing , and King Lear illustrate how different kinds of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 147–166.
Published: 01 January 2017
...Peter Arnade; Elizabeth Colwill Late medieval and early modern pardon letters are among the best sources of ordinary people's voices in the premodern period. The stuff of social history, these legal documents allow us access to nonelite social actors and masculine spaces of sociability. Yet they...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2013
... might talk of an ideology or hegemony of space and place. The essay then specifically studies dramatic examinations of place and space (with close reading of several moments from Hamlet and King Lear ) to delineate the various ways in which spaces are occupied by actors and audience members, and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 421–459.
Published: 01 May 2012
... artisan actors of the provincial mystery plays. In for example, Georg Brandes observed that Shakespeare’s burlesque scenes “doubtless drew upon childish memories of the plays he had seen performed in the market- place at Coventry and elsewhere.” In doing so, says Brandes, Shakespeare was satiriz...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 25–48.
Published: 01 January 2013
... space is, finally, phenom- enal space, space as experienced, by both actors and spectator/listeners. Included within that experience is not only seeing and hearing but smelling the odors of fellow audience-­members, tasting hazelnuts, feeling the touch of closely crowded bodies and imagining on...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2001) 31 (3): 443–444.
Published: 01 September 2001
... of the way in which medieval culture and its transformations have been perceived. Examples of the kinds of questions we are interested in include the following: questions of soteriology and atonement, the role of sacrifice in ritual and theater (in which an actor...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 571–580.
Published: 01 September 2002
... requires the actor playing the title role to crawl. It does, however, require an extraordinary range of other movements. In the storm of the heath, Lear casts off his clothes (“off, off, you lendings And near the cliffs at Dover, in one of the strangest and least motivated moments in Shakespeare, he...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 579–594.
Published: 01 September 2007
... truth — can be found even in his fables. This idea of interpretation itself — the tensions between the fictive and the true, the learned and the untaught — may lie in the reception his- tory of another fable: the story of the fox and the actor’s mask (Perry no. 27). This brief story reflects...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2007) 37 (3): 549–577.
Published: 01 September 2007
... ideas concerning the dignity and rights of the commons.13 If, then, the idea of the commons as a communitas regni loses vis- ibility and ground in the course of the sixteenth century, it never disappears entirely but remains available both to social actors and to playwrights in moments of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 165–174.
Published: 01 January 2001
... explain ideologies of the past that he or she would not want to share. But to ignore past actors’ contexts and excuses for what they believed is tantamount to a kind of dismissiveness comparable, in its imperiousness, to the colonial critique of “native customs.” The Colonial...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2004) 34 (3): 643–672.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Bardolators. Early modern devotees did something more substan- tial: they paid. The “subjective duty” rendered to Shakespeare’s aesthetic fabrications was back then all too objective, and therefore, on the Protestant view, all too Catholic. Whether audiences really venerated actors the way people had...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 71–98.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., protesting, “I am none of your fresh pictures, that use to beautify the decayed dead arras in a public theatre.” Here the boy actor alludes to the practice of hanging painted cloths over the arrases, but what is more striking is his depiction of the stage curtains as “decayed” and “dead” and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
... performance practices. More broadly, theater is an art of disposition and arrangement, a way of organizing actors and objects on the surface of the stage and in the real time of performance within a net- worked setting maintained by the collective attention of everyone present. Conceived in this way...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2010
... artistic creation or object. The theater of play deploys the “actor himself as an agent whose energies are mobilized and released by the play’s invitations, challenges, and demands.” Bishop produces a set of illu- minating examples in which he shows those energies at play; he allows us to see the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
... use three categories of space throughout this essay: performance space, representational space, and imaginative space. Performance space is the literal, physical, tangible surface upon which and through which actors move as they perform. Performance space is constituted by the literal boards...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2003) 33 (2): 281–309.
Published: 01 May 2003
... locale, a high bank opposite the church. Apart from the fact that in this notoriously flat part of the coun- try the embankment in question adjoins a Victorian railway line, since removed, this is a staggering claim: Are we to assume that in their effort to forward dramatic action the actors ran all...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 May 2013
... 220  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.2 / 2013 irrational. Even attempts to avoid problematic terminology often result in seeing the effects of such cures as being “imaginary,” casting doubt on the rational capabilities of historical actors.10 Despite considerable scholarly cri...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 39–66.
Published: 01 January 2005
..., but it is important not to overemphasize the novelty of this phenomenon, its London setting, or its representative nature. Increasingly actors—whether in traveling troupes performing in provincial halls and inns or in companies retained by lay and religious households, guilds, and the court...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 315–337.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the play text calls for the use of a nonhuman “image” of Christ in place of an actor. As I will show, the Croxton play also paradoxically enacts anxieties about the nature and propriety of dramatic activity itself; as Derrick Hig- ginbotham writes, it “focuses on impersonation as both potentially...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2002) 32 (3): 581–604.
Published: 01 September 2002
....; 16 plates. $45.00, paper $24.95. Man, John. Atlas of the Year 1000. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, (1999) 2001. 144 pp.; 49 illus., 1 halftone, 60 color maps. Paper $19.95. O’Dell, Leslie. Shakespearean Characterization: A Guide for Actors and Stu- dents. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood...