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Vulgate

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 561–586.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Daniel Cheely The Reformers' campaign to purge bibles of marginal glosses, finally achieved in the Authorized Version of 1611, was first achieved in the authenticated version of Latin Catholicism—the Sixtine Vulgate of 1590. Its sola scriptura format, however, did not last. Church authorities...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 365–394.
Published: 01 May 2012
... philology, theology, and philosophy, which Valla himself did not, in practice, separate discretely. His Annotations to the New Testament presents a case in point. As a collection of critical notes on the standard Latin translation of the New Testament (the Vulgate), the annotations themselves range from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 617–638.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Scott Mandelbrote This article discusses an illuminated copy of the fourth printed edition of the Latin Vulgate (Mainz, 1462), or 48-line Bible, which is now in the Perne Library at Peterhouse, Cambridge. It considers the history of the book in the late sixteenth century, when it passed between two...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 415–435.
Published: 01 September 2017
... James but the so-­called Geneva Bible, with over 140 editions and at least a half a million copies sold.5 Scripture was also available in Latin to a wide group of educated readers, both in the form of the medieval Vulgate and, after Erasmus’s translation in 1516, in an evolving series of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 451–453.
Published: 01 May 2016
... available in Latin to a wide group of educated readers—both in the Vulgate and, after Erasmus’s retranslation in 1516, in an evolving series of Protestant Latin versions. Moreover, it was produced in English translations both before and during the Renaissance. Working with the biblical text and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 31–42.
Published: 01 January 2009
... the Vulgate with reasons] (Lágrimas, 353; 8 – 10). Donne, on the other hand, gives us no indication of why he might have taken up this particular poetical gauntlet. Compared to the hyperorthodox Catholicism of Quevedo, the question of Donne’s shifting religious affiliations is considerably more...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 517–543.
Published: 01 September 2017
... aligns not just with the Geneva Bible but with the Vulgate or Tremellius’s translation too. At Exodus 31:9, for instance, the phrase “the altar of whole burnt offering, and all his furniture” has been emended to read, “the altar of burnt offering, with all his furniture.” Once again, a minuscule...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 289–326.
Published: 01 May 2005
... witless scribes, the pure text before all the meddling, ecclesiastical and secular. Th is is a virtually universal complaint from Valla’s Collatio Novi Testamenti in through the fi erce argument over the Vulgate, even to the Council of Trent in But the rancor Tyndale notes in the response to his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 339–379.
Published: 01 May 2016
... beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. (Exod. 20:4)28 “In the form of anything” was, in the Vulgate, “omnem similitudinem”; Luther translated it as “irgend ein Gleichnis” [any likeness].29 In 1525, responding to iconoclastic riots in Wittenberg, Luther ques- tioned not the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 257–281.
Published: 01 May 2009
... expresses it in his commentary on Psalm 100:1: “Now is still the time for mercy; the future will be the time for judgment” [Misericordiam et iudicium cantabo tibi, Domine (Vulgate3 Similarly, in his commentary on Vulgate Psalm 24:10 he speaks of the two comings of the Son of God, one in mercy, the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 407–427.
Published: 01 May 2014
... of Christology throughout the Middle Ages and into the Reformation. In that passage, kenosis names the process by which Christ empties himself of his divinity in order to become incarnate in human flesh. Exinanitio (from ex-­inanire, to empty out) is the Vulgate translation of kenosis, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 323–342.
Published: 01 May 2015
... their enemies (Exod. 14); the sun shone longer than usual to enable Joshua to win his battle (Josh. 10:11 – 13); and the angels themselves fought for Hezekiah against the Assyrians (2 Kings [Vulgate 4 Kings] 19:35). Moving to the New Testament: when Christ was born the angels rejoiced, and a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 583–602.
Published: 01 September 2016
.... So Gregory discusses with evident admiration the resolution offered by the bishops at the Council of Trent to the many questions that had been raised concerning the Vulgate Bible: “Recognizing that there were legitimate schol- arly questions about the Vulgate, they pronounced it, in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2001) 31 (1): 57–78.
Published: 01 January 2001
... barbarian and I will tell you who you are.” 7 See R. Mellinkoff, Outcasts: Signs of Otherness in Northern European Art of the Late Middle Ages (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993). 8 Gebhardt, Miniatures, 6, 8; S. Berger, Histoire de la Vulgate...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 487–506.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... Kinney, eds. The Vulgate Bible, Volume 3: The Poetical Books. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, vol. 8. Cambridge, 488  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 42.2 / 2012 Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2011. xxxviii, 1,187 pp. $29.95. [Vulgate text with facing-­page Douay-Rheims...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 391–410.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., and language have yet to be convincingly identi- fied, followed by studies of the manuscript.] Coulson, Frank T., trans. and ed. The Vulgate Commentary on Ovid’s “Metamorphoses”: Book I. TEAMS Secular Commentary Series. Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, 2015. xxviii, 209 pp...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2015) 45 (3): 595–613.
Published: 01 September 2015
... with the Jewish tax collector Levi — wrote in Hebrew. The official language of scripture for the Catholic Church was, according to the 1546 Council of Trent, the Latin of Jerome’s Vulgate; while sixteenth-­century humanist scholars, including Erasmus of Rotterdam, argued that Matthew wrote in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 587–597.
Published: 01 September 2017
... and New Testaments, with the Apocryphal Books, in the Earliest English Versions made from the Latin Vulgate by John Wycliffe and his Followers, 4 vols. (Oxford, 1850), 1:liv – lv. See also Dove, First English Bible, 241 – 42. 18 Henry VI’s and Henry VII’s Wycliffite bibles are...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 461–486.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Judeo-­Christian scriptures was rendered into English for the first (and second) time near the end of the fourteenth century: one translation, commonly known as the Early Version, closely replicates the Vulgate’s grammatical structures, while the translation known as the Later Version renders it...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2007) 37 (2): 221–269.
Published: 01 May 2007
... and the dead. These seven psalms (in the Vulgate, Psalms 6, 31, 37, 50, 101, 129, 142) had been isolated as a unit by Cassiodorus and by the time of Innocent III’s papacy (1198 –   1216) were specifically recommended for Lenten recita- tion. They could be recited to lessen time in purgatory for...