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Thomas More

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 483–501.
Published: 01 September 2022
...Nancy Bradley Warren This essay explores Thomas More's understanding of the role of the recipient's virtue in activating the full power of Christ's body in the Eucharist in his A Treatise on the Passion of Christe and A Treatise to receive the blessed body of our lorde, sacramentally and virtually...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 327–358.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Elizabeth Allen John Ford's play Perkin Warbeck uses sanctuary, which bookends the life of the titular pretender to the English throne, as a figure for the tension between justice and mercy. The play associates legal sanctuary with the medieval past, as crystallized in Thomas More's account...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 431–451.
Published: 01 September 2021
...Simone Waller This essay argues that Christopher St. German made tactical use of the dialogue form to cultivate a public in his print controversy with Thomas More on the subject of reform. Publishing in the early 1530s, More accused St. German of disseminating disgruntled speech in print absent...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 305–326.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of the present, like Richard Pace and Thomas Elyot — men who value the “comune treasores” (sig. F6r). In conclusion, Elyot reiterates that he does not feel that the Brutus legend provides the right kind of origin for Britain: Fynally, I haue alwaye thought and yet doo, that it is more hon...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 191–217.
Published: 01 May 2022
... of Dionysius made him a contested authority in Thomas's time, and in his battles with secular clergy the Dominican theologian shows himself a more careful interpreter of the pseudo‐Areopagite than his contemporaries, who purported to defend hierarchy against the mendicants. This study presents the reading...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 541–564.
Published: 01 September 2020
..., their Consultations, Designs, Policies … exposed to every mans eye.” Then in 1655, Cabala stationers Bedell and Collins arranged for the printing of another volume focused more closely on ambassadorial correspondence: The Compleat Ambassador , which centered on Queen Elizabeth’s potential marriage to successive ducs...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 633–657.
Published: 01 September 2020
... nostalgia, The Whore of Babylon became even more politically topical and sensitive in its 1619 revival than in its original context. Copyright © 2020 Duke University Press 2020 early modern diplomacy Thomas Dekker’s The Whore of Babylon English and Spanish relations chivalric rhetoric...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (1): 147–173.
Published: 01 January 2022
..., the estate's fauna join in this chorus of praise by voluntarily sacrificing themselves for the lord's sustenance (this is the case in Jonson's poem, as well as Thomas Carew's “To Saxham”). Sometimes the flora participate in the encomia (as in Lanyer's more elegiac poem). Servants too often appear so...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 457–485.
Published: 01 September 2015
... and 1617, Milles published more than a dozen books outlining his schemes for fiscal reform, becoming one of Renaissance England's most prolific writers on economics. But virtually every surviving copy of every published text was customized after it left the press: Milles used manuscript marginalia...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 213–231.
Published: 01 May 2016
... of the finite verb. I will examine the theory of verbal mood as it appears in the works of Thomas Linacre, a founding father of English humanism and friend of Grocyn, Colet, Erasmus, and More. Linacre spent twelve years in Italy, learning Greek from Poliziano and Chalcondyles in Florence and taking...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 415–435.
Published: 01 September 2017
... and Nicholas Hardy), or household tutors such as the English Catholic Thomas Marwood (examined by Daniel Cheely), or more obscure anonymous English readers (explored in articles by Mary Raschko, Thomas Fulton, Adam Hooks, and Scott Mandelbrote)? If the annotators are writers, how did they rework...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 249–268.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... In Book 8 of his Confutation of Tyndale’s Answer (1532 – 33), Thomas More responds to the evangelical Robert Barnes’s account of where the Church is, and how she is to be known. Instead of deploying direct attack, More reverts to a much more efficient technique, the use of fiction. He imag- ines...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (3): 439–461.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Thomas Betteridge A central aim of Tyndale's polemical works was to convert the mass of the populace to a more rigorous and meaningful engagement with Christ's teaching. In this he shared the concerns of most early-sixteenth-century religious reformers. Alongside this pastoral desire, however...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (1): 141–161.
Published: 01 January 2007
... the cobbler who stitched up Aiolos’ bag of winds, you will discover the course of Odysseus’ wanderings.  — Eratosthenes (Strabo, Geography I, 2.15) The Island of Utopia, literally “Nowhere” (Oeτoπr or Never-Never Land (Nusquama) can be located on no map. St. Thomas More, who as a charac- ter in his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 587–597.
Published: 01 September 2017
... it printed from Worms and Antwerp in 1526.4 Early English printers did not print Wycliffite bibles, presumably because of a prohibition on owning or reading the text made by Archbishop Thomas Arundel in 1409.5 However, Thomas More acknowledges that such manuscript bibles were both known...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 119–147.
Published: 01 January 2010
... as products of the same repertory, with Shake- speare himself performing (as is recorded) in Sejanus, possibly acting the role of Tiberius.31 Another confrontational play, Sir Thomas More, may be worth considering in this context, since it is self-conscious about late medi- eval literary history...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 381–404.
Published: 01 May 2016
... for Lay Householders Amy Appleford Boston University Boston, Massachusetts Richard Whitford, an Oxford-­educated theologian, fellow of Queens’ Col- lege, Cambridge, and friend of Desiderius Erasmus and Thomas More...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 343–365.
Published: 01 May 2015
... examined in relation to their coun- terparts in these texts, the rebels in Jack Straw are distinguished by the con- sistency of their stance and by their refusal to abandon their cause, even in defeat. A brief examination of three plays from the 1590s — Thomas of Woodstock, Sir Thomas More, and 2...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... the Utopians. In the gesture to an ideal medieval Christianity, even in his efforts to corroborate this vision with academic evidence, the book explores ways of explaining the present without recourse to “history” alone. Gregory stands in the company of Thomas More here (whose absence from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 577–585.
Published: 01 September 2021
... preserved “booklet on the situation and nobility of London” describing the city's life as it had been in 1174—when it was touted as the birthplace of a newly sainted Thomas Becket—Stow averred that the medieval city was more familiar to an older generation of Londoners than the Elizabethan metropolis...