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Renaissance physiognomy

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 1–7.
Published: 01 January 2024
...John Jeffries Martin; Manuela Bragagnolo From the late Middle Ages through the eighteenth century, the science of physiognomy played a central role in the intellectual life of what we might call “the long Renaissance.” Indeed, it did much to shape both the portrayal and the understanding...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 103–130.
Published: 01 January 2015
...John Jeffries Martin In early modern Europe, judges read the bodies of victims and suspects through a variety of lenses shaped by popular beliefs, Renaissance notions of physiognomy, and by the study of medicine, classical rhetoric, and natural law theory. This article explores the writings...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 9–32.
Published: 01 January 2024
... 2024 Renaissance physiognomy legal procedure in Venice physical evidence Antonio Pellegrini Giovanni Ingegneri In 1545, the Venetian humanist Antonio Pellegrini published his I segni della natura ne l'huomo ( The Signs of Nature in Man ). 1 In dialogue form, this work reproduces...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 113–135.
Published: 01 January 2024
... History 51, no. 2 (2017): 293–312. On Renaissance physiognomy, see Martin Porter, Windows of the Soul: Physiognomy in European Culture (New York: Oxford University Press, 2005). 28 Joseph Ziegler, “Philosophers and Physicians on the Scientific Validity of Latin Physiognomy, 1200–1500,” Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (3): 611–613.
Published: 01 September 2022
... / January 2024 Physiognomy was, as is well known, one of the most influential disciplines of the Renaissance. Based on the interpretation of bodily signs to read inner moral and intellectual inclinations, physiognomy developed in the West from the twelfth century and quickly acquired the status...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 57–87.
Published: 01 January 2024
..., Anthropometria (Frankfurt, 1663), 9. 62 Elshlolz, 10. 63 Jean Taxil, L'astrologie et physiognomie (Tournon, 1614), 3 and 24. See Courtine and Haroche, Histoire du visage , 41. 64 Maclean, “Evidence, Logic, and the Rule of the Exception in Renaissance Law and Medicine,” 248. 65...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 165–201.
Published: 01 January 2024
... drawings and, of course, with his portraits. fpereda@fas.harvard.edu Copyright © 2024 by Duke University Press 2024 Francisco de Goya Renaissance portraiture physiognomy caricature personality La mayor hipocresía, y más dañosa, y sin fundamento, es la de la sabiduría...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 403–405.
Published: 01 May 2022
... by Manuela Bragagnolo and John Jeffries Martin Volume 54 / Number 1 / January 2024 Physiognomy was, as is well known, one of the most influential disciplines of the Renaissance. Based on the interpretation of bodily signs to read inner moral and intellectual inclinations, physiognomy developed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 33–56.
Published: 01 January 2024
...: Physiognomy, Law, Medicine, and Art in Sixteenth-Century Venice,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 54, no. 1 (2024): 9–32. 2 For an excellent overview of the Renaissance dialogue as a genre, see Jon R. Snyder, Writing the Scene of Speaking: Theories of Dialogue in the Late Italian...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 203–216.
Published: 01 January 2024
..., vol. 30. Leiden: Brill, 2020. x, 355 pp., 2 color and 8 black-and-white illus. Hardvover, ebook. Devriese, Lisa, ed. The Body as a Mirror of the Soul: Physiognomy from Antiquity to the Renaissance . Mediaevalia Lovaniensia, Series 1, Studia, vol. 50. Leuven, Belg.: Leuven University Press, 2021...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 325–346.
Published: 01 May 2010
... concretely a number of pervasive social and cultural anxieties about masculine self-presentation in Bruno's time. This essay brings together literary and cultural history within the broader context of gender and body studies of Renaissance Italy, in particular, and, more generally, of the European...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 May 2021
... withered desecration during the Passion, these mandylions allowed direct access to a countenance of arresting vitality and unique physiognomy. Their frontal address gives the sensation of a face staring out of its frame. It is defined by an elongated nose, darkened shadows forming the shape of the brow...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 159–195.
Published: 01 January 2015
... Christian cul- ture in Renaissance Italy, these aberrant actions were also feared as insidious threats from within. Child-­killing was often presented as an unnatural deed committed only by outsiders like Jews and witches, yet it was also thought to be an act Christian women perpetrated to hide...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 137–163.
Published: 01 January 2024
... open the skull, you will find the brain still completely frozen.” Gendry sums up that all of these and other attempts at deception “are discovered through the signs with which the good surgeon is familiar.” 59 If the science of physiognomy posited a relationship between outward signs and inner...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 321–365.
Published: 01 May 2021
... was one of the achievements of the Renaissance, an indicator of the emancipation of the craftsman from guilds and laws, as if it is only in the extreme circumstance of psychological isolation that an individual identity may emerge. 40 Hugo van der Goes, the first artist of this kind, led a career...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., antipodal pressures exerted themselves on the interface of the spiritual and physical worlds: the physical became more suffused with the spiritual, and the spiritual became more untrace- able in the physical. So we have, on the one hand, medicinal tracts invest- ing humoral physiognomy with spiritual...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 253–284.
Published: 01 May 2022
... with physiognomy. Yet, elsewhere etymologies sit awkwardly because Corbechon leaves links unexplained. Garlic's name is explained thus—“ailet est ainsi appellé pour ce qu'il puet selon Ysidoire” (228r) [garlic is so called because it stinks according to Isidore], with no connection made between alium...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (1): 113–146.
Published: 01 January 2001
... of analysis find a natural point of overlap in exploring the cultural work of the Saracens, whose dark skin and diabolical physiognomy were the Western Middle Ages’ most familiar, most exorbitant embodiment of racial alterity.3 Most scholarship on Saracens has been...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 255–277.
Published: 01 May 2017
... the knightly male body through the lens of physiognomy, in order to parse the way violent male subjectivity is linked to the body’s physicality, embody- ing a form of masculinity that Yvonne Tasker calls “musculinity.”35 This pro- 262  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 47.2 / 2017 cess...