1-20 of 239 Search Results for

Renaissance court cases

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 33–56.
Published: 01 January 2024
... into their courts on suspicion of crimes—and to do so without resorting to torture. john.j.martin@duke.edu Copyright © 2024 by Duke University Press 2024 Francesco Casoni Renaissance court cases torture legal evidence interpretation of bodily signs In 1561, the northern Italian jurist...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 35–55.
Published: 01 January 2008
... position as one of near equality with the prince, even if the two men, within 50  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 38.1 / 2008 the established hierarchy of the court, can never be equal. The Cortegiano is a descriptive, rather than prescriptive, treatise that makes a case for a group...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
...- lowe, ed. Paul Whitfield White (New York: AMS Press, 1998), 96; Curtis Perry, “The Politics of Access and Representations of the Sodomite King in Early Modern England,” Renaissance Quarterly 53, no. 4 (2000): 1054 – 83. 3 Burnett shows how groups at court could vie for the natural...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (1): 1–7.
Published: 01 January 2024
... role in what we might call “the long Renaissance.” And as the articles in this special issue show—shedding light onto an aspect that has been largely neglected by scholarship up to now—this was also the case for jurists. In fact, jurists and judges turned to physiognomy as a form of knowledge...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 147–169.
Published: 01 January 2008
.... H., ed. Equity Cases in the Court of Exchequer, 1660  –  1714. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, vol. 313. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2007. xliv, 724 pp. $89.00. Christenson, Allen J., trans. and ed. Popol Vuh: Sacred Book of the Ancient Maya...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 201–221.
Published: 01 January 2009
.... Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. xv, 758 pp.; 4 maps. $195.00. Colker, Marvin L. Trinity College Library Dublin: Descriptive Catalogue of the Mediaeval and Renaissance Latin Manuscripts, Supplement One. Dub- lin: Four Courts Press for Trinity College Dublin, 2008. 220 pp.; 32 color...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 659–670.
Published: 01 September 2020
.... At this particular juncture in the field, we have dozens and dozens of case studies. Each year witnesses new books and articles on the multi- faceted identity of the diplomat, no longer loyal servant of the Renaissance state, but courtier and careerist, reader and writer, religious partisan and connoisseur...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 41–62.
Published: 01 January 2000
... flow of material which has broadened our knowledge of how female sodomy was envisioned during the early modern period.4 The court case of Katherina Hetzeldorfer will serve to unsettle even further “the myth of lesbian impu- nity,”5 “(in)visibility” (Patricia...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 587–608.
Published: 01 September 2020
...Danila Sokolov This essay undertakes a cross-cultural interpretation of Giles Fletcher the Elder’s diplomatic mission to Muscovy (1588–89). It brings Fletcher’s official report on his embassy to the court of Emperor Fyodor in conversation with its Russian counterpart, in addition to placing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (3): 459–481.
Published: 01 September 2009
... DOI 10.1215/10829636-2009-001  © 2009 by Duke University Press Renaissance courts were in constant flux as nobles moved in and out of a ruler’s household.7 These developments had an enormous impact on the material cul- ture of the age, which witnessed an unrestrained accumulation of goods...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 339–374.
Published: 01 May 2000
... Lancashire Witches, ed. Barber, lines 479–80. All subsequent citations are from this edition by line number. 74 Quintrell, “Government in Perspective,” 55. 75 For the prevalence of social negotiation before taking a case to the courts, see Clive Holmes, “Women: Witnesses and Witches,” Past...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 33–52.
Published: 01 January 2020
... in the court, deploying a number of the conventions of female complaint that were to become ubiquitous in the 1590s in order to participate in the construction of the reputations of the figures involved.29 The female speaker is represented as deserving and constant, making an effective case for her virtues...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 145–172.
Published: 01 January 2013
... I call an environment of entertainment, a space of welcoming that is always incipiently theatrical. The special settings of hospitality (hall, stage, court- yard, pavilion, street, lawn, camp site) support discrete instances and genres of convivial performance (banquet and ball, masque and play...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (2): 349–378.
Published: 01 May 2001
... it should or must, whether a more positive view of discipline can be successfully defended. My test-case is a lyric poem, George Herbert’s “Discipline.” The poem is an obvious choice, and its argument clearly invites a Foucauldian reading. Herbert (or his...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 January 2008
..., duties, behaviors, and qualities of the “good ambas- sador,” but always within the tradition of the ethical institutio. This tradi- tion, which developed from the Renaissance on, drew both on the values of the nobility and the court and on a discourse of individual abilities and prudence. Only from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (2): 393–416.
Published: 01 May 2011
... in Carol Edington, Court and Cul- ture in Renaissance Scotland: Sir David Lindsay of the Mount (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1994), 146  –  47; and McGinley, “ ‘That Every Man May Knaw’: Reformation and Rhetoric in the Works of Sir David Lyndsay.” For Scottish history...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 477–492.
Published: 01 September 2020
... dissatisfaction with a lapse of innova- tion and how, for many years, its development has remained out of sync with the wider and ever- growing interdisciplinary developments in the study of early modern Europe. Garrett Mattingly s Renaissance Diplomacy (1955) 478 Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 53–73.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., for instance, and their diaries, and, above all, in their testimonies for and before courts — but all such stories, it is abundantly clear, are shaped by the strategies, situations, and expressive habits of the tellers, and by the narrative conventions of their world. Stories in or for a court...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 299–323.
Published: 01 May 2010
... that were at once responsible for overcoming these limitations and invested in their continued existence. a Notes All translations of Spanish sources in this article are my own. 1 On these court cases, see Ursula Lamb, “Science by Litigation: A Cosmographic Feud,” Terrae Incognitae 1...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (3): 653–667.
Published: 01 September 2016
... and Renaissance. Translated from the Italian by Murtha Baca. With a biographical essay by Cesare De Michelis. The Lorenzo Da Ponte Ital- ian Library. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015. x, 407 pp. $75.00. [English translation of Branca’s anthology of texts by Italian merchant writers of the late...