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Petrarch

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2005) 35 (3): 457–466.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2005) 35 (3): 489–508.
Published: 01 September 2005
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Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2005) 35 (3): 509–536.
Published: 01 September 2005
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Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2005) 35 (3): 537–558.
Published: 01 September 2005
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Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2005) 35 (3): 559–582.
Published: 01 September 2005
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Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2005) 35 (3): 663–680.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (2): 211–246.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Jennifer Summit Topography as Historiography: Petrarch, Chaucer, and the Making of Medieval Rome Jennifer Summit Stanford...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2024) 54 (2): 221–244.
Published: 01 May 2024
...Kristján Hannesson Scholars have related Petrarch's reflections on fragments and ancient ruins to his poetics and to his evolving sense of self. He expresses fears that his texts might become fragmented in the hands of posterity, and he would rather burn them than show them to the public...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (2): 177–191.
Published: 01 May 2021
...Peter Godman This article focuses on the significance of two letters in Petrarch's Rerum familiarum libri which were probably composed in or around 1351, arguably but not demonstrably on the basis of previous versions, and addressed to Cardinal Giovanni Colonna, who had passed away during...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2005) 35 (3): 467–488.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 431–448.
Published: 01 September 2000
... about geographical expansion.3 Petrarch’s passage on the Fortunate Isles in Vita solitaria 2.6.3 portrays the natives as “without culture” (gens inculta), similar to beasts wandering in a wasteland at once savage and yet oddly pastoral.4 Petrarch also discusses...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (2): 323–347.
Published: 01 May 2020
... to the Ancients. Not only, according to Niccoli, should scholastic philosophy be entirely rejected, but even the achievements of the three crowns (Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio), which Salutati highly praises, ultimately betray a lack of erudition and style. Salutati is satisfied by Niccoli s skills...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 1–6.
Published: 01 January 2015
... to rebury Falloppio’s bones together with those of Guilandinus, thus reuniting forever the two friends who feared they were too close for comfort when alive.3 Unusual? Not really. When Petrarch’s huge marble tomb was reopened one last time on the seven-­hundredth anniversary of his birth...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 45–68.
Published: 01 January 2014
... autonomy: otium and withdrawal. Otium To think about monasticism in the sixteenth century, it may make sense to cast an eye back to Petrarch, the monk manqué. In De vita solitaria, according to Ronald G. Witt, Petrarch recognized that as “a cleric, living in retirement, without clerical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 347–371.
Published: 01 May 2010
.... By the time Skelton began his career as a writer in the late fifteenth century and, shortly thereafter, received the distinction of “laureate” from perhaps as many as three universities, the laurel had long been familiar as a sym- bol of poetic eminence.16 Petrarch’s famous staging of his own laureation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (3): 547–574.
Published: 01 September 2000
... really begin to live. In Petrarch’s Secretum, St. Augustine leaps from his late antique “then” into Petrarch’s fourteenth-century “now,” in part to teach the poet how to read. “Efficere tibi illas familiares,” he says, make those texts famil- iar...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (1): 225–245.
Published: 01 January 2011
....] Barański, Zygmunt G., and Theodore J. Cachey, Jr., eds. Petrarch and Dante: Anti-­Dantism, Metaphysics, Tradition. With the assistance of Dem- etrio S. Yocum. The William and Katherine Devers Series in Dante Stud- ies, vol. 10. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009. xii, 414 pp...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 345–371.
Published: 01 May 2014
... has changed significantly since Kelly’s pioneering essay almost forty years ago. If the Renaissance means engagement with pagan antiquity and valorizing Latin over the vernacular (the stance to which Petrarch and a repentant Boccaccio subscribed) and making use of Latin texts in the creation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (3): 469–491.
Published: 01 September 2007
... that in some versions the Middle Ages closed and the Renais- sance begins, as it were, on one bright day; but Gibbon’s attention, as his title suggests, was on the Roman Empire and the belated demise of a political, rather than Petrarch’s prior reinvention of a spiritual, Romanitas.4 The Byz- antine...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (2): 433–450.
Published: 01 May 2016
... germanici in der Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg (Cod. Pal. Germ. 496 – 670). Kataloge der Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, vol. 11. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2014. xxxv, 668 pp. eur 168.00. Kleinhenz, Christopher, and Andrea Dini, eds. Approaches to Teaching Petrarch’s “Canzoniere...