1-20 of 81 Search Results for

On the Fabric of the Human Body

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Amanda Taylor The sixteenth century witnessed the publication of landmark texts on anatomy and allegory: De humani corporis fabrica or On the Fabric of the Human Body by Andreas Vesalius in 1543 and The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser, published first in 1590. Each of these texts has received...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Valeria Finucci In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body , which delved inside the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based on what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 105–124.
Published: 01 January 2018
..., “Sylvius is the last one from whom I would have expected such an opinion” (qtd. in O’Malley, 219). 22 Garrison and Hast, trans. and eds., Fabric of the Human Body, 1:lxvii. 23 Katherine Rowe, Dead Hands: Fictions of Agency, Renaissance to Modern (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 January 2016
... is the creation of a political creature after the image of a philosophical creature, or it is an infusion of the soul or faculties of a man into the body of a multitude. (Har- rington, A System of Politics, ca. 1661) For as divers members of our human bodies make but one...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 79–104.
Published: 01 January 2018
... Perhaps to compensate for his relatively limited experience with human female anatomy, Vesalius places special emphasis not only on his ability to render visible the insides of the body, but also his ability to touch and manipulate once-­secretive structures of the female body. Discussing the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 11–40.
Published: 01 January 2018
... spatial organization. How could the differ- ent anatomical features be identified and distinguished one from another in a written form without compromising pictorial clarity? One solution was to imprint the names of gross features on the printed image of the human body itself, in keeping with the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 373–405.
Published: 01 May 2014
... glimpse of Atawallpa through the veil, they were sudden to come on and quick to pass. These moments of perceptual discomfiture — the Incas’ wonders — exposed the deep-­seated fabric of the world. Posed before the Inca veil, Pizarro’s soldiers were enlisted in the Incas’ conjury of sacred energies...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... own maternal genealogy) but also in the chronology that appears on the first leaf of the Liber Floridus autograph manuscript, which begins with the earliest events of human history and ends in Jerusalem in 1099 at the point of triumph that concluded the First Crusade. Significantly, this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... not be exactly animal or human, but rather an entombment of one within the other, Faustus would not be exactly dead or alive, but trapped within a beastly effigy. Once Pythagoras is invoked, the tenuous tripartite relation of soul to body to animal under- mines the seamless construction of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 141–165.
Published: 01 January 2016
... crucified body before his death. The evangelist Luke leaves us the sole brief hint at one of the most human moments of Christ’s final hours: And he was withdrawn from them about a stone’s cast, and kneeled down, and prayed, saying, Father, if thou be willing, remove this...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... childhood game with one of my companions in the yard of a country school. I was looking upward when I saw the heavens open and Our Lord Jesus Christ in human form emerge and come toward me. “Look!” I cried to my companion, “There’s Our Lord and he is coming to me...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 255–277.
Published: 01 May 2017
...). The poet thus encourages the practicing knight to see the post as an enemy’s human body, but one that is comprised of multiple targets for destruction. For example, in a litany of body-­strikes, he instructs such knights to “Empeche his hed, his face, have at his gorge, / Bere at the breste...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 469–502.
Published: 01 September 2014
... place of human figures, sacred things self-­sufficiently go about God’s business on this page and in every other painting in the St. Giles’s Hospital Processional. Despite its ostensible mandate to represent the orderly performance of the blessing of the pas- chal candle, the scene summons to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (1): 53–77.
Published: 01 January 2015
... the ways in which early modern Europeans responded to one of humanity’s greatest enigmas. Suicide was “a very special way of dying,” to borrow a phrase from the landmark study of self-­murder in early modern England by Michael MacDonald and Terence Murphy.4 For Renaissance Europeans, suicide...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 89–115.
Published: 01 January 2016
... lover’s body has already been punished with death; the public opprobrium brought on him through the acquittal of his tormentor constitutes yet another, more lasting punishment. Such penal measures persist beyond the grave: Mieulx vault mort vivre en ung bon non, Tant que le monde...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 41–59.
Published: 01 January 2018
... corporis fabrica (Basel: J. Oporinus, 1543); trans. Wil- liam F. Richardson and John B. Carman, On the Fabric of the Human Body, 7 vols. (San Francisco: Norman Publishing, 1998 – 2009); and trans. Daniel H. Garrison and Malcom H. Hast, The Fabric of the Human Body: an Annotated...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (1): 119–141.
Published: 01 January 2009
... of a “yard”: flesh, to be sure, but also mere cloth. One imagines the crowd of Londoners to include not a few tailors and apprentices, who would have nearer acquaintance than we have today with such fabrics as “Camocho” or “Callimanco.” It is hard not to remark this 124  Journal of Medieval...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (2): 359–390.
Published: 01 May 2017
... sweep of the human condi- tion? Those homely artifacts on which people relied to help them get along? Small-­format cartography thus does not fit the narrative privileged by theories of the archive; but it also fails to conform to the ways that actual archives are ordered. It falls under...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (1): 7–52.
Published: 01 January 2017
... from them almost from the start, which speaks to its utility as a wonderful tool. Jonathan Gebhardt: I think that Italian microhistorians saw a problem with the way historians of the Annales School and Marxist social historians made certain assumptions about human nature, focusing largely on...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 225–255.
Published: 01 May 2009
... Discovery of Nature  227 the existential predicament of human beings, on the possibilities for moral behavior, on God. If we are wrong about what people think about Nature, we will be hopelessly wrong about what they think — and feel — full stop.6 These assertions...