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Meditations on First Philosophy

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2018) 48 (3): 599–616.
Published: 01 September 2018
... René Descartes Meditations on First Philosophy philosophical conversion narrative Cartesian demon early modern selfhood ...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 33–59.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Henry is fol- lowing this same meditative trajectory. Beginning with the three reasons he ought to say to God “mercie et graunt mercie,” a play on words that simultaneously evokes thanks and a recognition of his own need for divine mercy, Henry considers first the gift of life and the material...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 113–133.
Published: 01 January 2014
... important clue to understanding Bacon’s perspective on natural philosophy is given in the passage from Valerius Terminus, in which Bacon refers to the “first state of creation” of human beings. In a number of his writ- ings, Bacon framed his justifications for the pursuit of natural philosophy in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 135–161.
Published: 01 January 2014
....” It is often assumed, he suggests, that meditations must be difficult and unpleasant. The source of this view, however, is a “prejudice” or “a needless Scruple, which makes some fancy themselves obliged to confine their thoughts to the subject that set them on work” (29 – 30). The first...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 107–130.
Published: 01 January 2012
..., and so our responsibility in the maintenance and projection of meaning will be suppressed. The agreement will generally be in language and not in me. Critics have failed to notice the difference in Mankind’s two voicings of mercy, the first one, a pseudo-­naming of mercy, and what I am calling...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 367–393.
Published: 01 May 2015
... “blunt” human knowledge, Montaigne transforms the philosophical tradition itself into the “material” of interest. At first this passage seems quasi-­Baconian in suggesting that intellectual progress is possible over the space of generations (“where one man had failed, another has succeeded...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2002) 32 (1): 167–198.
Published: 01 January 2002
... at least four centuries. This simple building, probably first built in the Romanesque period, is decorated with a series of frescoes (see fig. 1).20 On the walls of the nave is a Passion cycle, which was executed in two stages. The first, which covers about half of the cycle, was completed around...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 303–334.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Cressida’s downfall acknowledges the ethical importance of poetic responses to shifting standards of feminine virtue in premodern England. Before turning to the poetic tradition, we should first ask the ques- tion, Why did feminine virtue undergo a transformation between late medi- eval and early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 321–344.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Elizabeth (ca. 1593) and one by John Bracegirdle (ca. 1602).17 Two sides of incarceration in the philosophical dialogue between Boethius and Lady Philosophy are pertinent to the present discussion. First, by associating the voice of Boethius with (political) captivity the Consola- tion...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 163–186.
Published: 01 January 2014
... associates came at a time when Cartesianism and the mechanical philosophy were favorably received into Bourdelot’s sci- entific academy.79 Descartes attempted to devise a solution to the episte- mological crisis created by philosophical skepticism in his Meditations by establishing one fundamental...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 7–35.
Published: 01 January 2010
... scholarly era hoped for by Hardison has been a little like what happened when the first followers of Jesus were awaiting the Kingdom — what they got was the church.6 Aside from one lonely heretic, the same people who cite Hardison as a major turning point pointedly omit his dismissive references to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 213–231.
Published: 01 May 2016
... constitutes it.”1 Waswo was by no means the first to take this line. Before him, William Bouwsma made the same argument, saying that for Renaissance thinkers “the word, now humanized, created its own human cosmos out of crude experience,” and that “the construction of man’s conceptual universe became...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 407–432.
Published: 01 May 2009
... “all.” “London,” thus, must be redefined. Though addressed to a personi- fication of the male-dominated and hierarchical London Whitney inhabits, her “Wyll” calls on readers collectively to imagine and create a city that belongs to and is everyone: I first of all to London leave...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... the twenty-­first century is not simply determined by one’s ignorance of other processes in other periods that may be more “influential” and less “indirect” in their “influence”? Compare a much simpler case than those which concern Gregory. In the great medieval poem Piers Plowman, William...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 333–363.
Published: 01 May 2012
... experience a new union with Christ. As Barbara Newman explains, the individual’s two parts “are linked not directly to one another, but only through their mutual coinherence in Christ.”37 The wholeness of the individual requires his or her oneness with Christ, but their bond takes form first in their...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 559–592.
Published: 01 September 2010
... apparently encompasses the materialist philosophy of the Greek atomist Epicurus, a philosophy turned into powerful Latin poetry by Lucretius in De rerum natura. But in the Latin work of systematic theology that remained unpublished in his lifetime, De Doctrina Christiana (first published in 1825...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 221–253.
Published: 01 May 2017
..., “everything impossible, inadmissible, and inaccessible [is] quite possible for Nemo.”29 And yet it is God’s power, not Nemo’s, that underscores both the comedy and quite serious argument about not no one but nothing in one of the first troubadour lyrics, “Farai un vers de dreit nïen,” by William...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... clear meaning. Invoking metempsychosis, or the transmigration of the soul, indexed this insecurity. The essay first considers the implications of the mention of metempsychosis in Merchant , and then surveys literary and theological texts that elaborate the ambivalence it implies. The essay concludes...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 241–280.
Published: 01 May 2014
...- ship must accept the fact of its own historicity.1 My discussion is divided into three main sections: first, some com- ments on periodization and its problems; second, a survey of some concep- tual and methodological tendencies that have enriched, complicated, but also inhibited our...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 539–566.
Published: 01 September 2012
... point: Figural prophecy implies the interpretation of one worldly event through another; the first signifies the second, the second fulfils the first. Both remain historical events; yet both looked at in this way, have something provisional and incomplete about them...