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John Bois

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 609–615.
Published: 01 September 2017
... the book's annotator as John Bois (1561–1644), one of the principal translators of the King James Bible of 1611. The article explains why this and other material pertaining to Bois and the King James Version has previously been overlooked and considers how further evidence might be uncovered in the future...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 415–435.
Published: 01 September 2017
...? How did individual readers over the course of this period treat and encounter the biblical text — literary figures such as Geof- frey Chaucer or Amelia Lanyer (discussed by Andrew Kraebel and Andrew Fleck), or biblical scholars such as Samuel Ward or John Bois (discussed by Jeffrey Miller...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 517–543.
Published: 01 September 2017
... partially prompted, on one side, by a fondness for the Geneva, and on the other by a hatred of it. The eminent Oxford scholar and puritan John Rain- olds (1549 – 1607), who reportedly first raised the idea to James I during the conference’s proceedings “that there might bee a newe translation...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 445–476.
Published: 01 September 2001
... France, and of them nearly 1,400,000 saw action. Just under two percent, or 122,500, died, more dead of disease (73,591) than of wounds inflicted in battle (48,909).84 Calculat- ing the dead as a percentage of those eligible for combat produces a more striking impression of loss. John Keegan reports...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2009) 39 (2): 331–373.
Published: 01 May 2009
..., the idealized, golden-haired putto rests in a secluded glade. He is blessed with two toys, a pinwheel held in his right hand and, strangely placed under his left knee, a hobby horse. According to John Florio’s dictionary, bischeri meant not “lute pegs” or a “childs hobby horse or riding sticke” but also...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2001) 31 (3): 507–560.
Published: 01 September 2001
... and experience, on the way to matu- ration. But by then having him turn away from the “prymer” (517) he is learning at the reading school to the “antiphoner” (519) of the song school, she makes him deliberately regress. John Burrow argues that “the specifica- tion of the boy’s age (not found in [all but one...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2016
... referring to it with the same word that Macrobius uses, operimentum. Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, in his Sententiae, speaks of the foreskin using this term.64 And John Donne gives us an explication of Bernard and uses the same anatomi- cal vocabulary in his Sermon 130: We must circumcise, says...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2021) 51 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 September 2021
... along the boundaries of their parish, where boundary markers were blessed, prayers were said, and bounds were memorialized. John Mirk's Rogationtide sermon (ca. 1380) gives an early description of the order of perambulation: “yn processyon bellys ryngþe, baners ben borne befor, þe crosse comyþ aftyr...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (1): 157–179.
Published: 01 January 2012
...- iles, John Brinsley, schoolmaster from Ashby-­de-­la-­Zouch in Leicestershire, places them firmly in the context of learning Latin.29 Moreover, the content of these sayings and dialogues formed the bulk of schoolboys’ first collections of commonplaces, which had a central place in rhetorical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 January 2010
... of pursuit that points up the element of collabora- tion in the actors’ assignments not to see and be seen. The scene begins with the following brief exchange:   Enter Benedick alone. Benedick: Boy!  [Enter Boy.] Boy: Signior? Benedick: In my chamber-window lies...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
..., partly because of the ambiguities in their own descriptions of the disease. Such well-known European physicians as Bernard de Gordon (ca. 1260 –  1380), John of Gaddesden (ca. 1280 –  1361), and Guy de Chauliac (ca. 1300 –  1368), working in the Hippocratic-Galenic tradition, and particu- larly...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2017) 47 (3): 587–597.
Published: 01 September 2017
... ver- sion, which was first created around 1390 by a team of translators under the influence of the fourteenth-­century Oxford theologian John Wyclif.1 This fifteenth-­century manuscript was produced ca. 1410 – 20 and also contains the prologue that has been attributed to the Wycliffite John...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
... contributions to core concepts of this article. 1 In 1602, John Manningham, a young lawyer, recorded witnessing “a play called Twelfth Night” at a feast. See Michael Baird Saenger, “Manningham on Malvolio,” Shakespeare Newsletter 43.4 (1993): 159– 61. 246  Journal of Medieval and Early...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2013) 43 (1): 121–144.
Published: 01 January 2013
..., Heather Dubrow points out that she does not live in the woods but on its margins — or as Rosalind puts it, “in the skirts of the forest, like fringe upon a petticoat” (3.2.325). Citing Sir John Manwood’s Treatise and Discourse of the Lawes of the For- rest (1598), Dubrow argues that Rosalind’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 487–506.
Published: 01 May 2012
... Glaser. Introduction by Christine Chism. Indianapolis, Ind.: Hackett Pub- lishing, 2011. liii, 83 pp. $32.95, paper $10.95. Capgrave, John. The Life of Saint Katherine of Alexandria. Translated by Karen A. Winstead. Notre Dame Texts in Medieval Culture. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (2): 321–344.
Published: 01 May 2014
... political philosophy of John Fortescue and George Buchanan. Much more than a broadly gendered metaphor for queenly submission, this language of royal imprisonment derives its legitimacy from discourses that touch upon the very ideological foundations of English and Scottish monarchy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (2): 343–365.
Published: 01 May 2015
... the rebel achieves a symbolic victory over his opponents. It is within this alternative framework that I wish to situate the anonymous Life and Death of Jack Straw, the only late-­Elizabethan play to chronicle the Rising from the perspective of its lead- ers, Jack Straw, Wat Tyler, and John Ball.2...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (1): 149–172.
Published: 01 January 2010
..., in an outpouring of fervor in the period of the failed Essex rebellion (1601), Queen Elizabeth’s death and the assumption of James VI of Scotland (1603), and the attempt on James I’s life in the Gunpowder plot (1605). The earliest and best known of them, Sir John Oldcastle (in two parts by Drayton, Hathway...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (3): 549–583.
Published: 01 September 2014
... and the Sacramental Sign  551 unconsumed, preserved, as it seems, by Art.” John Strype examined one of these caskets and surmised that the heads were those of “some zealous Priests or Friers, executed . . . for denying the King’s [Henry VIII’s] Supremacy.” The artifacts were sold and, Strype speculates...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (2): 299–323.
Published: 01 May 2010
... Argensola, for example, relates the Portuguese delegates’ opinion that Spain’s maps, based on Magellan’s new charts, were purpose- fully inaccurate, having been “painted with malice” [pintado con malicia] because of Magellan’s past disagreements with King John III of Portugal (CIM 44...