1-20 of 82 Search Results for

Incarnation of Christ

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2009) 39 (2): 225–255.
Published: 01 May 2009
... essay examines the role of “trees of incarnation” as contemplative models in women's religious communities for making Christ present in the imagination and in the world. M. D. Chenu's attention to the category of nature in his historical and theological writings is then revisited in order to propose...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2019) 49 (1): 57–84.
Published: 01 January 2019
... terms that do important work in King Lear : “take on,” “take up,” “bear,” “bear with.” These terms are all complexly associated, in late medieval and early modern discourses, with the incarnation of Christ, and with the ritual taking of Christ’s body in the Eucharist. And they are all associated with...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
... practices worked to displace fundamental anxieties generated by the “sacramental cannibalism” of the eucharistic feast, in which the body and blood of Christ were fused with those of communicants through the process of ingestion. The medieval counternarrative mythologizing lepers, women, and Jews as would...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2010) 40 (2): 273–297.
Published: 01 May 2010
... through the poem, the essay draws out examples of medieval agents participating in the craft of forgiveness with varying degrees of inadequacy when compared with Jesus Christ, the embodiment of forgiveness. It focuses on two versions of community in the poem: the political model of forgiveness in the Mede...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2014) 44 (2): 407–427.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Ages and into the Reformation. In that passage, kenosis names the process by which Christ empties himself of his divinity in order to become incarnate in human flesh. Exinanitio (from ex-­inanire, to empty out) is the Vulgate translation of kenosis, and Donne, one of the first to use the term...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 405–432.
Published: 01 May 2016
... incarnate to address. The remedy that Christ finds out is nothing other than the mechanism of intercession — that Christ can speak for forfeit souls and, in so doing, impute his perfect virtue to them. Such a remedy is so potently generative that it creates a new Adam, gifting to humankind an...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 January 2012
..., into the Tertia Pars. The Summa theologiae’s treatise on Christ The Summa theologiae’s treatise on Christ falls into two main parts.10 In the first part, consisting of the first twenty-­six questions, Aquinas discusses the main features of the Incarnation, looking in turn at the fittingness...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2012) 42 (2): 307–332.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Steven Justice Scholarship has routinely assumed that the many medieval eucharistic miracle stories about hosts witnessed as discernibly the body of Christ — newborn, bloody, crucified, or dismembered — were designed to quell doubts in the doctrine of the Mass with coercive ocular confirmation. But...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2018) 48 (2): 227–260.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., pastoral and devotional, prose and poetry, intellect and affect. Rather than portray Christ in the excessively erotic context usually associated with affective spirituality, A Christian Mannes Bileeve stages a dialogue of voices that teaches how to “think with the heart.” This new understanding of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Langland composes an allegorical narrative in which Wille (the dreamer, the visionary, the faculty of the will, the figure of the poet) meets Christ as the Samaritan who rescues the half-­alive Semyvief in a wilderness where this person has been assaulted by thieves and left to die. Someone new to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2015) 45 (2): 395–418.
Published: 01 May 2015
... confident expectation [certissima expectatio] of those future things which, through faith [per fidem], are already ours in Christ” CPW( 6:476; DC 4:406). This same connection between faith, confidence, and hope is highlighted by Aquinas in the Summa Theologiae, which points to the linguistic link...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2011) 41 (2): 317–343.
Published: 01 May 2011
..., anthologies group these texts together under nonliterary rubrics related to gender or to themes implicitly or explicitly linked to women, such as the persistent identification with Christ, the focus on the body, and the seeming immediacy of personal experience and first- ­person narrative.2 Such...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2012) 42 (1): 35–57.
Published: 01 January 2012
.... Astell / Heroic Virtue  39 37). “I wanted to make you dependent upon one another, so that each of you would be my minister,” Jesus explains to Catherine (19; trans., 38). Stressing the role of the virtues in uniting the members of the Church, one with the other, in Christ, Catherine offers a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2016) 46 (3): 629–651.
Published: 01 September 2016
... course mean the Mass itself: the anamnesis of that meal at which the bread broken for man- kind by Christ is his own body.53 The descent of God at the Incarnation, continued and perfected in the self-­abasement of the Passion, is interpreted in the gospels as the spiritual fulfillment of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 95–112.
Published: 01 January 2014
..., these same Platonists cannot know God. They mistakenly believe that they can reach him by purely intellectual means, whereas in fact he can only be reached through the sacraments, which were instituted with the Incarnation of Christ. For Augustine, the superiority of Christianity over ancient...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2014) 44 (3): 617–643.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Gre- gorian calendar, dividing the week into seven days and the year into twelve months, counting the years from the birth of Christ. Instead, time would begin with the birth of the Age of Reason, which had taken place, the revo- lutionaries decided, on the 22nd of September 1792. The first of...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... required weeks of sequestered but supervised visionary contemplation, in which the Jesuit imagines scenes and images of the life and passion of Christ, as an entrance into both the historical experience of Jesus and his own inner life. Ironically, Brébeuf’s notes on his experience have long been...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 657–698.
Published: 01 September 2012
... To summarize greatly, the portal features, across its tympanum, a depiction of the biblical event of Pentecost, recounted in the Book of Acts – In the center, a large enthroned figure of Christ sends the tongues of fire onto the heads of the gathered apostles. Witnesses of the event from...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 135–161.
Published: 01 January 2014
... of existence that can occasionally gather itself in moments of intensive attending, but must eventually come back to the experience of its scattered existence. Acts of attention only reveal the fallen character of human attention, and Augustine concludes book 11 by longing for Christ, in an...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... become explicit. Instead, Shylock, as an avatar of the soul that cannot be visible, is purged from the stage with the efficiency of Christ’s exorcism of the evil spirits.36 He is kept distant from the space of the stage, a place, like the celebratory parade, of signs and flesh and empty speech, a...