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English Civil War

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2018) 48 (3): 553–598.
Published: 01 September 2018
... unveil the nature of that ecosystem and to explore the ways in which Creech's Familist underground fed into, and was in turn transformed by, the anarchic sectarian eruptions of the English Civil War and Revolution. The resulting analysis illuminates the ideological upheavals that turned the political...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 January 2016
... prominently in this intriguing textual landscape. Focusing on this particular healing paradigm, and drawing on insights from cultural theory of the body and medical history, this intertextual analysis of medical writings, English Civil War playlets, and political treatises by Harrington, Winstanley, Coppe...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 January 2009
... of intrigue against the English polity. Pleasant notes itself was a defense of pre–Civil War literary values (where Ben Jonson is regarded as the English Cervantes) and of pre–Civil War and Civil War Oxford (during which time the university was the royalist headquarters), which is presented as a...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2012) 42 (3): 635–655.
Published: 01 September 2012
...Claire Walker The wealth of recent scholarship on early modern English news culture has paid scant attention to women as consumers and producers of news. This article argues that women not only read about the tumultuous events of the Civil War and Interregnum, but that they participated in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 255–277.
Published: 01 May 2017
... physical and psychological weapons. © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 medieval English chivalry knighthood masculine body Secreta Secretorum Knyghthode and Bataile • • Bodies Hardened for War...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 419–443.
Published: 01 May 2013
...) and Anthony Wood (1657 – 95). Collectively, their volumes span nearly fifty years and account for perspectives from both sides of the English Civil War. Both writers were of prominent socioeconomic status: Twysden, a baroness, moved between homes in Kent and London; and Wood, an Oxford scholar...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2017) 47 (2): 359–390.
Published: 01 May 2017
... alike until well after the Civil Wars.24 The grubby appearance of small-­format cartography makes it less familiar today than the “magnificent,” beautifully illustrated folios of such well-­studied authors as Christopher Saxton, William Camden, and John Speed.25 However, big, expensive...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2005) 35 (1): 13–24.
Published: 01 January 2005
... Simpson’s approach: “the pagan setting is,” he says of Lydgate’s Troy Book, “strategic: it permits a wholly secular vision of politics and war, and it does so in order to persuade English knights against imperial mission, and against the dangers of civil war” Grammatical tenses are active rather...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2010) 40 (1): 119–147.
Published: 01 January 2010
... thinking that Mosaic political rule was not merely con- trary to New Testament doctrine, but “most absurd,” “perilous,” “seditious,” “false,” and “stupid.”79 Yet many Puritans sought to make English law har- monize with Mosaic law. As Whitgift complained, Cartwright “bindeth the civil magistrate to...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2013
... challenges the efforts of English nation-­making projects — such as colonial endeavors in the New World and Ireland, the 1579 Christopher Saxton county maps, and hostility and war brought to a head with the Spanish 62  Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 43.1 / 2013 Armada — that...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 405–438.
Published: 01 May 2004
... the revolutionary sects. Keith Thomas observes that In the Episcopal returns and Indulgence documents of the reign of Charles II conventiclers are frequently described as being “chiefly women,” “more women than men,” “most silly women” and so on. During the Civil War...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 425–438.
Published: 01 September 2010
... abrupt political transformation during the Civil War and Interregnum era.23 The Reformation was an ecclesiological and political reformation, one in a line of many, each focused on the central configuration of the relationship of the English crown and its Parliament to the English church, its...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2000) 30 (2): 247–274.
Published: 01 May 2000
... his magnates; “[i]n the summer of 1321, Edward had no active support whatsoever,” as evident in his finally having to give in to the baronial demand that he banish his two favorites, the Despensers.18 Nevertheless, when civil war erupted anew in the autumn, Edward was able to raise a strong levy...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2016) 46 (2): 263–287.
Published: 01 May 2016
... experiences of rape or attempted rape are not the texts’ chief focus, and we rarely hear from the victim her- self.8 As Rose observes, “[R]ape acts as a figure for agendas other than sex- ual: property crimes, homosocial interaction, acts of war, or religious evil.”9 In contrast, Middle English...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2000) 30 (3): 519–545.
Published: 01 September 2000
... awaiting the introduction of English civilization. In his 1852 speech inaugurating the University of Sydney, we find Woolley openly depicting the colony as a wilderness comparable to, but even more isolated than, the ancient wilds in which Alfred founded Oxford...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2017) 47 (1): 75–119.
Published: 01 January 2017
... fathers • The Desert War of a Carolingian Monk Paul Edward Dutton Simon Fraser University Burnaby, British Columbia In memory...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 January 2009
... follishe booke agaynst the Pope and war taken therewith, and there goodds all con- fiskyd, and theyr bodyes in daunger off burning, if we had not made for them great frinds and intreatance.43 In 1539, the merchant Thomas Pery did public penance along with four other English...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2009) 39 (1): 43–64.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Channel  59 area of about twenty miles around Dublin under the jurisdiction of the king of England, named for the palus or wooden stake that marked the bound- ary. For Spenser’s commentators, The Pale is simultaneously the only war- rant of English civilization in Ireland and the harbinger of its...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2017) 47 (3): 487–516.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Admonition to England and Scotland (1558) For Thomas Hobbes, eighty years old and looking back to Tudor England for the causes of the English Civil War, the Marian exiles who created the Geneva Bible bore a singularly heavy responsibility.1 In Behemoth, the His- tory of the Causes of the Civil Wars...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2013) 43 (2): 393–417.
Published: 01 May 2013
... authentically “English.” Rather, it was just the opposite —  the laws were truly English because they were fitted to their heterogeneous past. Such views were not just the province of royal apologists like the civil lawyer John Cowell, who claimed in The Interpreter that “the law of this land hath been...