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Cartesian demon

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2018) 48 (3): 599–616.
Published: 01 September 2018
..., Descartes's Devil (looking suspiciously like his God). The aim of this essay is to give the under-imagined Cartesian demon his due and track the effects of this never-quite-expurgated figure on the coherence of a paradigmatic form of early modern selfhood. Copyright © 2018 by Duke University Press 2018...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 163–186.
Published: 01 January 2014
... Cartesian method—to which she was exposed in the Scientific Academy of her physician, Pierre Michon Bourdelot—to her own irreligion actually brought about her conversion to orthodoxy. Anne's “test” of faith therefore compels us to rethink the relationship between the New Philosophy and faith in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2008) 38 (3): 559–587.
Published: 01 September 2008
...- figuration; the redeemed soul lived forever in his or her own beatified, or per- fected body: “it is our necessary companion in the ultimate joy of heaven.”58 This pre-Cartesian insistence on the psychosomatic unity of body and spirit meant that medieval theology was continually engaged in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2016) 46 (1): 141–165.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Spirit of God could fuse with these vital spirits in one's heart, the implications for “moments of grace” in Protestant piety are highly intriguing. The same can be said, mutatis mutandis, for moments when a “demonic” thought is suspected to have invaded the heart or brain. © 2016 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2006) 36 (1): 169–200.
Published: 01 January 2006
... system of thought that promoted detection and empirical observation, emphasizing difference and exceptionality. Foucault, in his influential early work The Order of Things (originally Les Mots et les Choses [1966 argued that the Cartesian critique . . . excluded resemblance from being a fun...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2004) 34 (2): 309–344.
Published: 01 May 2004
... However, it was the work of Huarte that most attracted the attention of the modern linguist. Chomsky first drew attention to Huarte’s work in a long footnote in his Cartesian Linguistics, where he credits the Spanish doctor for emphasiz- ing the innate generative power of the human mind, for...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2013) 43 (1): 99–120.
Published: 01 January 2013
... mean- ing of the signifier soul — its insistence on a lack of referent, its spacing from the senses and the world — is here a call to exert a faithful charity across the unknown. The mercy that Rawlinson implores his congregation to demon- strate stems from an embrace of the limits of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 455–473.
Published: 01 May 2006
... Ablondi, Fred. Gerauld de Cordemoy: Atomist, Occasionalist, Cartesian. Marquette Studies in Philosophy, vol. 44. Milwaukee: Marquette Univer- sity Press, 2005. 128 pp. Paper $17.00. Akkerman, Fokke, and Piet Steenbakkers, eds. Spinoza to the Letter: Studies in Words, Texts, and Books. Brill’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2006) 36 (2): 475–477.
Published: 01 May 2006
... Ablondi, Fred. Gerauld de Cordemoy: Atomist, Occasionalist, Cartesian. Marquette Studies in Philosophy, vol. 44. Milwaukee: Marquette Univer- sity Press, 2005. 128 pp. Paper $17.00. Akkerman, Fokke, and Piet Steenbakkers, eds. Spinoza to the Letter: Studies in Words, Texts, and Books. Brill’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2014
... and right reason, according to the weights and by the standard of the Scripture” — was a Cartesian proposal, barring the last clause, although it was six years before the Discourse on Method was published. Starting with the conviction that “contemporary Europe was not a Christian culture in...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 September 2010) 40 (3): 559–592.
Published: 01 September 2010
... hypothesis “received its death-­blow on the fall of the Cartesian, and establishment of the Newto- nian, Philosophy”: after Newton, the rejection of “scientific, common sense materialism” could rest only on superstition and prejudice. Rather unexpect- edly, Lewins turns to poetry to make his point...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2005) 35 (2): 429–452.
Published: 01 May 2005
.... Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, x, pp. Paper Lehrich, Christopher I. Th e Language of Demons and Angels: Cornelius Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy. Brill’s Studies in Intellectual History, vol. Leiden: Brill, xiii, pp.;  fi gs. Lennon, Th omas M., ed. Cartesian Views...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 187–213.
Published: 01 January 2014
... of female bodies and souls led to institutional suspicion and regulation of their visionary experience. The problem with such porosity for Christian theology is that one might just as easily find oneself entered and possessed by demons as by holy spirits, whispered to in sleep or trance by...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 May 2008) 38 (2): 253–283.
Published: 01 May 2008
..., distract the faithful from more meaningful forms of worship.27 In sharp contrast to the Lollards’ antisacramentalism and icono- clasm, Wisdom mounts its defense of the sacrament of penance through a series of dramatic visual spectacles. While, most readily, the play demon- strates the...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (1 January 2014) 44 (1): 69–94.
Published: 01 January 2014
... last clause, this could be a Cartesian proposal. By the 1650s, such gestures of rationalist autonomy had become rather a cliché. Ferrar, however, is writing in 1631, six years before The Discourse on Method. In 1631 turning one’s back on the past was scarcely typical, particularly among English...