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Assumption of Mary

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2019) 49 (1): 57–84.
Published: 01 January 2019
... with narrative representations of the assumption of Mary, in which the son she has borne and taken into herself now takes her up and bears her to heaven. How, in King Lear , do these narratives and practices of assumption inform tragic action? How does the language of assumption enable this play’s peculiar...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2022) 52 (2): 219–251.
Published: 01 May 2022
... as in life, Thomas arrives late on the scene. Similar yet different, doubt itself plays uncanny twin to its older sibling, belief. The pervasive nature of Thomas's incredulity emerges also in his recidivism. In the apocryphal account of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, Thomas, the only disciple absent...
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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (2): 229–252.
Published: 01 May 2008
... or dramatic performance; as stage properties, scents have rarely impacted the critical work on late medieval or early modern material histories of the stage, no doubt due to the assumption that olfaction lacks both a history and an archive.5 And, when it is addressed, olfaction emerges as an ahistorical...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2000) 30 (1): 1–4.
Published: 01 January 2000
...Ann Marie Rasmussen © by Duke University Press 2000 This content is made freely available by the publisher. It may not be redistributed or altered. All rights reserved. JMEMS30.1-01-Rasmussen.1-4 12/21/99 4:26 PM Page 1...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (2): 261–300.
Published: 01 May 2018
... in hell see her wings and assume she is an angel: “they saw her coming ying, in the guise of a resplendent angel” Following the typical medieval assumption that angels are male, the souls call out to her saying “sir” [Señor]. Mary has to clarify to them that she is a woman: “Don’t call me Sir, I...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (3): 383–385.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Contribution to Clement ofAl exandria’s Refutation of Gnosticism (New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 1977), demonstrated both her philologi- cal facility and her control of intellectual history. In its critique of conven- tional assumptions about the dominance of Platonism in Clement’s thought...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2012) 42 (2): 269–305.
Published: 01 May 2012
..., this glorious virgin, triumphed over all her enemies, until at last, in complete virtue, she shed her chaste blood for Christ’s sake This virginal triumph over death — as enacted by the Virgin Mary’s Assumption, the undecayed bodies of such virgins as Saint Etheldreda, and the triumphant...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 163–186.
Published: 01 January 2014
... Queen Mary, University of London United Kingdom On April 18, 1709, Elizabeth-­Charlotte, duchesse d’Orléans, wrote to the Electress Sophia of the Palatinate and complained about the “simple-­ mindedness” of her new confessor Bertrand Claude de Lignières. In this let...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2002) 32 (2): 269–304.
Published: 01 May 2002
... of the Cross. Another Beverly guild, the fraternity of St. Mary, had a more elaborate and mimetic procession, with actors representing Mary, with a child in her arms, Joseph, Simeon, and two angels.15 The Chester Assumption play, eventually incorporated into the city’s Corpus Christi cycle, seems...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2007) 37 (2): 393–418.
Published: 01 May 2007
... queens as a group. Perhaps the most famous lineage of such queens runs from Catherine de Médicis through Marie-Antoinette. As historical figures go, both remain lively in both schol- arly and popular imagination. They are very much a part of French history, associated with the cataclysms...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 403–412.
Published: 01 September 2008
... strategies with their doctor. Such testimony, the authors argue, broadens the parameters of pre-Enlightenment medical cul- ture and challenges our assumptions about professional/lay relationships. In “The Body Debated: Bodies and Rights in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Germany,” Mary...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2014) 44 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2014
... as to argue that faith in the later Middle Ages and Renaissance was an ideology “not merely as we might define it from our own perspective,” but as “the very name that early moder- nity itself gives to ‘ideology,’ or something very like it” — namely, the fabric of assumptions that “hold together...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2010) 40 (3): 463–495.
Published: 01 September 2010
... the regime had more and more frequent, indeed we might almost say intermittently habitual, recourse to the tech- niques and assumptions of “popularity,” as they tried to defend and perpetu- ate the Protestant state against the threat of popery, in general, and of Mary Stuart, in particular, and, indeed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2023) 53 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 January 2023
.... They illustrate how English Protestant scholarship reinforced stereotypes, while also prompting self-reflection and inspiring the reconstruction of England's own traditions and cultural assumptions. Expanding English ecclesiastical, theological, exegetical, philological, and cultural interests, the volume calls...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2015) 45 (3): 595–613.
Published: 01 September 2015
... it can begin to overturn gendered assumptions about Nicholas Ferrar’s dominance and restore to the narrative the work performed by his nieces: Margaret, Anna, and Mary Collett, and Virginia Ferrar. These women sometimes planted, within the harmonies, tiny images of collective female textual labor...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2011) 41 (3): 545–576.
Published: 01 September 2011
... its painting of the Assumption by slicing the faces of the apostles, while sparing Mary’s countenance entirely.96 If Morisco ambivalence toward Mary continued during the Expul- sion, Christian apologists believed that there was little ambiguity about the role she herself played during...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 January 2020
...- seventeenth- century Antwerp. In the life of Mary Cotton (in religion Sr. Mary of the Blessed Trinity), we find this intriguing connection between Henrietta Maria s court and the exiled convents through the complex figure of Margaret Cavendish: [W]hen she [i.e., Mary] came to be Religious the Dutchess of New...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2004) 34 (1): 95–146.
Published: 01 January 2004
... Identity 101 and Bewcastle monuments as evidencing two tendencies or variations within the development of the same style.5 So, what are scholars doing when they invoke and appeal to the authority of style? What unacknowl- edged or unexplained assumptions are they appropriating and organizing...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2020) 50 (3): 515–539.
Published: 01 September 2020
... refusal to repudiate theoretical claims that might in some circumstances justify rebellion and regicide made him the effective accomplice of fanatics like the Gunpowder traitors. This assumption also underlay the Oath of Allegiance adopted by Parliament in the wake of the plot. It was carefully framed...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2003) 33 (1): 23–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
... historical settings) to notions of culture, religion, politics, and power.15 For this purpose I suggest that we may read the late Roman Chris- tian holy land as an instance of what Mary Louise Pratt has dubbed a “con- tact zone”: “a social space . . . where disparate cultures meet, clash, and grap...