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Andreas Vesalius and his successors

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Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 61–78.
Published: 01 January 2018
... recorded their professors’ often quite critical assessment of Vesalius and his achievements. Copyright © 2018 Duke University Press 2018 Andreas Vesalius and his successors early modern anatomical education animal and human dissection student notebooks medical discoveries...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Valeria Finucci In 1543 Andreas Vesalius published his landmark work of anatomy, On the Fabric of the Human Body , which delved inside the human body to see what made it work. Vesalius’s illustrations of body parts were based on what could be seen with the eyes through the practice of dissection...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2018) 48 (1): 153–182.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Amanda Taylor The sixteenth century witnessed the publication of landmark texts on anatomy and allegory: De humani corporis fabrica or On the Fabric of the Human Body by Andreas Vesalius in 1543 and The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser, published first in 1590. Each of these texts has received...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008) 38 (3): 589–610.
Published: 01 September 2008
... recognized as the most famous medical poem. This first edition is a considerable rarity.31 Anatomies The early anatomies in the collection center on Andreas Vesalius and the numerous editions of his work.32 One of the most influential of all pre- Vesalian works, Anathomia, by Mondino dei Luzzi...
Journal Article
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2016) 46 (1): 141–165.
Published: 01 January 2016
... ardent.1 These remarkable words come from the 1555 edition of Melanchthon’s com- mentary on Aristotle’s De anima. Melanchthon had first published a version of this in 1540. He significantly revised it, however, in 1552, in the light of Andreas Vesalius’s seminal anatomy textbook, De humani...