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Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1993) 18 (4): 996–999.
Published: 01 August 1993
...Phil Brown Michael R. Reich. Toxic Politics: Responding to Chemical Disasters . Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991. 316 pp. $45 cloth, $15.95 paper. Copyright © 1993 by Duke University Press 1993 996 Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law to the ways that these strategies...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2015) 40 (1): 73–99.
Published: 01 February 2015
... Brazil suggests that the reasons that governments respond are different at these three levels. International forces, historical institutions, and social health movements were factors that prompted national government responses. At the urban and rural government levels, receiving federal financial...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 2002) 27 (2): 273–292.
Published: 01 April 2002
... nation's sense of well-being. More emphasis therefore needs to be placed on indirect effects and on the medical, social, economic, and legal consequences that follow months to years afterward. To respond effectively to CBN attacks, a comprehensive strategy needs to be developed that includes not only...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 December 2002) 27 (6): 977–1000.
Published: 01 December 2002
...Ann Boulis; Susan Goold; Peter A. Ubel In fall 1997, a shortage of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) developed in the United States because of increased demand for the product, reduced supply,and product recalls. This shortage is a useful model for understanding how our health care system responds...
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Published: 01 October 2018
Figure 4 Trends in Self-Rated Happiness among Respondents of Reproductive Age (18–45 Years) in the United States and Australia: General Social Survey, 1979–2012 Source : NORC, University of Chicago Figure 4 Trends in Self-Rated Happiness among Respondents of Reproductive Age (18–45 Years) in More
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Published: 01 October 2018
Figure 5 Trends in Trust in Others among Respondents of Reproductive Age (18–45 years) in the United States and Australia: General Social Survey, 1979–2012 Source : NORC, University of Chicago Figure 5 Trends in Trust in Others among Respondents of Reproductive Age (18–45 years) in the United More
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 2019) 44 (3): 533–558.
Published: 01 June 2019
...Julianna Pacheco Abstract Context: The majority of studies linking health to political behavior capture an individual's health with an ordinal survey question, called self-rated health status (SRHS), that asks respondents to rate their health along a five-point scale (e.g., excellent to poor...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1985) 9 (4): 595–609.
Published: 01 August 1985
...Jon R. Gabel; Thomas H. Rice The purpose of this paper is to examine how physicians respond to changes in payment levels from government insurers. Our analysis focuses on two issues: controlling overall program expenditures, and assuring full access to care for program clients. We review evidence...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 December 2010) 35 (6): 849–887.
Published: 01 December 2010
... insurance. Respondents believe inequalities in access to and quality of health care are more unfair than unequal health outcomes. Even after taking into account self-interest considerations and the other usual suspects driving policy opinions, perceptions of the unfairness of inequalities in health care...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 2011) 36 (2): 317–352.
Published: 01 April 2011
...Eduardo J. Gómez Using a temporal approach dividing the reform process into two periods, this article explains how both Brazil and the United States were slow to respond to AIDS. However, Brazil eventually outpaced the United States in its response due to international rather than democratic...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1994) 19 (3): 633–642.
Published: 01 June 1994
... Indiana. While survey respondents were generally able to obtain health insurance through the Medicare program or employer-based private health insurance plans, many experienced formidable barriers to adequate and affordable health insurance, such as preexisting exclusions, cancellations, high premiums...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 2014) 39 (2): 263–293.
Published: 01 April 2014
... draw upon a theoretical framework developed by Mansbridge to explain this apparent nonresponsiveness to seniors on the ACA. This framework distinguishes between promissory representation, whereby legislators merely respond to constituents' preferences, and anticipatory representation, whereby...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1997) 22 (2): 363–382.
Published: 01 April 1997
... service industries, and advances in medical technology. Within the health care industry, there is a pattern of organizations taking the initiative to respond to these external forces—often in anticipation of them—and other organizations then responding to the pressures in turn placed on them. Although...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1998) 23 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 February 1998
...Alan Jacobs The comparative literature on health care reform has identified a convergence upon market models as nations respond to similar economic, technological, social, and demographic pressures. In this article I first challenge the conventional view by comparing “market” reforms of the late...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 October 2017) 42 (5): 961–984.
Published: 01 October 2017
... respondents across the various stakeholder groups perceive that immigrants' documentation status minimizes their ability to access health care even when they have health coverage. Specifically, respondents expressed that intersecting public policies, concerns that using health services would jeopardize future...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1996) 21 (3): 409–432.
Published: 01 June 1996
... eligibility and service mandates, federal court decisions on hospital and nursing home rates, and health care inflation; and the need to respond to these outside forces has placed increasing pressure on state finances. Other evidence, however, suggests that the adverse effect of Medicaid growth on state...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 December 2004) 29 (6): 1153–1186.
Published: 01 December 2004
... be considered. This article examines lessons for HIA in the United States from the related and relatively well-developed field of environmental impact assessment (EIA). We reviewed the EIA literature and conducted twenty phone interviews with EIA professionals. Successes of EIA cited by respondents...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 October 2005) 30 (5): 839–868.
Published: 01 October 2005
... politics of private regulation by following a dramatic case, obesity, through the political process. We describe how obesity evolved from a private matter to a political issue. We then assess how different political institutions have responded and conclude that courts will continue to take the leading role...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 2009) 34 (2): 181–217.
Published: 01 April 2009
.... Statistical analyses show that owners of Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) and Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) experience policy feedback effects, but in opposite directions. More specifically, matched comparisons of respondents in a national survey indicate that IRA participants are more likely to favor...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 2009) 34 (2): 261–284.
Published: 01 April 2009
... respondent characteristics. Results indicate that few people are using digital technology to get information, communicate with health personnel, or make online medical purchases. Furthermore, less well educated, lower-income individuals living in rural areas tend to use the health care Internet less than...