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long-term services and supports

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Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 2015) 40 (3): 531–574.
Published: 01 June 2015
... impaired older adults in need of long-term services and supports (LTSS). Three strategies have been commonly pursued by state governments to improve LTSS: expanding noninstitutional care, integrating payment and care delivery, and realigning incentives through market-based reforms. These strategies were...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 December 1997) 22 (6): 1329–1357.
Published: 01 December 1997
... beneficiaries’ services, and it appeared to show small savings over what a traditional Medicaid program might cost without its capitated approach (McCall et al. 1995). Long-Term Care System Program Enacted in 1989 Support for expanding the program to cover long-term care services was widespread...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1995) 20 (1): 75–98.
Published: 01 February 1995
... nursing home appears to reduce nursing home use. However, our results do not allow us to con- 92 Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law clude that offering a broader range of supportive services decreases such use. Our results contrast with those from the National Long-Term Care...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1991) 16 (3): 523–545.
Published: 01 June 1991
.... Cone, and J. Leon. 1984 . Descriptive Analysis of the In-Home Supportive Services Program in California. Berkeley, CA: World Institute on Disability. Toward a National Personal Assistance Program: The Independent Living Model of Long-Term Care for...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 2016) 41 (4): 763–780.
Published: 01 August 2016
... part of a grand conservative coalition to shrink the boundaries of the welfare state? 1. Others use the phrase long-term services and supports . 2. This percentage excludes Medicare outlays for time-limited nursing care following hospitalization or for certain home health services...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1981) 6 (1): 9–28.
Published: 01 February 1981
... volume of demand for long-term care (LTC) and to shortcomings in the melange of current programs. Demand for publicly supported LTC services is already estimated to be three times greater than supply, and likely will have grown on the order of 40 percent between 1975 and 1985.' Of the 5.5-9.9...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1993) 18 (4): 937–965.
Published: 01 August 1993
... other, by assessing how access to nursing home care, both at the hospital and in the market, affects trans- fers to home health care. Using multivariate regression analysis I examine how market- wide and hospital-specific access to long-term care services affects postacute transfers to home...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1998) 23 (2): 363–390.
Published: 01 April 1998
... program influences spending in the other. One might expect that states would try to maximize the use of Medicare dollars by substituting Medicare-sponsored services for Medicaid support whenever possible, but some states seem to have a his- tory of active Medicaid investment in long-term care that...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1984) 9 (2): 281–290.
Published: 01 April 1984
... Woodfin, in their excellent review of health systems plans, assert, “Thoughtful planning for long-term support should be based on estimates of both current andfuture needs of the vulnerable population for a full array of interrelated services Glassman et al. claim that central to the tasks of...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1994) 19 (3): 583–595.
Published: 01 June 1994
...David Falcone; Robert Broyles Race continues to impede access to health services, for acute as well as long-term care. Whites, for example, use disproportionately more days of nursing home care than do nonwhites, not simply because they are more likely to be private payers and, therefore, are...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1985) 10 (2): 245–273.
Published: 01 April 1985
... is already paying for too large a share of available long-term-care services, while others believe that families bear too large a burden and the costs of caring for the frail elderly should be shared more broadly through expanded government pro- grams. The evidence supporting each line...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1977) 2 (2): 190–211.
Published: 01 April 1977
... adequate, efficient care is rendered to the consumers of long-term care services. Major advances in combating infectious and traumatic conditions have shifted morbidity patterns toward the chronic diseases. Declining birth rates and longevity patterns indicate that the aged will be accounting...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1992) 17 (3): 403–424.
Published: 01 June 1992
... available to them, because the Medicaid program already pays for their nursing home costs. Clearly these social insurance approaches could assist the spouse of a person using long-term care services to remain self-supporting. However, they would also place the government in the position of...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1984) 9 (2): 348–352.
Published: 01 April 1984
... Reviews 349 In this slim volume, first published as the Summer 1983 issue of Home Health Care Services Quarterly, Howard Palley and Julianne Oktay offer a timely review of the existing long-term-care system in this country and its manifest failure to accommodate the varied service...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 2018) 43 (2): 185–228.
Published: 01 April 2018
... randomized experiment testing how these three communication strategies affect stigma, Americans' willingness to pay taxes to improve the mental health service system, and their support for expanding a range of mental health treatment options, including community-based outpatient treatment, long-term...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1979) 3 (4): 452–455.
Published: 01 August 1979
... blend of social support and medical services. Long-term care in this country, however, developed in the direction of an institutionally-based medical services model rather than a social and medical services framework. Institutions-hospitals and primarily nurs- ing homes-have been the...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1989) 14 (3): 549–563.
Published: 01 June 1989
... months is expected to be 14,000, versus 29,900 currently receiving some long-term care services and a 1984 estimate of 79 ,OOO with need for support. Second, the program’s purpose can best be achieved if eligibility determination, enrollment, and patient communications are carried out through...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1986) 11 (3): 463–481.
Published: 01 June 1986
... impossible to achieve. Since its inception two decades ago, the Medicaid philosophy has been to pay only for those services which are strictly medically and institutionally oriented. Medicaid has done little to encourage development of noninstitutional forms of long-term care (such as homemaker...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 2005) 30 (4): 751–764.
Published: 01 August 2005
... Services—States Seek to Change the Face of Long-Term Care: Oregon . Washington, DC: Congressional Reference Service, October 26. Wilsford, David W. 1994 . Path Dependency, or Why History Makes It Difficult but Not Impossible to Reform Health Systems in a Big Way. Journal of Public Policy 14 : 251...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1994) 19 (1): 221–225.
Published: 01 February 1994
... beginning or the end of a long-term stay. The administration has dangled an attractive lure. Taken at face value, their proposal could represent a major step forward for long-term care. They place strong emphasis on providing coverage for home and commu- nity-based services rather than for...