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excess

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Published: 01 October 2016
Figure 1 Market Clusters: Excess Demand, Balanced, and Excess Supply Markets Figure 1. Market Clusters: Excess Demand, Balanced, and Excess Supply Markets More
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1983) 8 (1): 76–98.
Published: 01 February 1983
...Nelson S. Hartunian; Charles N. Smart; Thomas R. Willemain; Paul L. Zador Between 1976 and 1980, 28 state legislatures in the United States repealed or weakened their motorcycle helmet-use laws. This paper estimates the number of excess deaths attributable to this deregulatory activity, and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1978) 3 (3): 345–360.
Published: 01 June 1978
...Erwin A. Blackstone This article concludes that substantial excess neurosurgical capacity exists. Neurosurgery like other specialties has permitted almost free entry and as a result of such factors as high earnings and status, excess capacity has developed and because of insufficient competition it...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1985) 9 (4): 695–715.
Published: 01 August 1985
...Fred Thompson Our analysis suggests that a properly designed and implemented safety inspection program for motor vehicles would probably produce benefits in excess of costs, whereas most existing state programs probably produce costs well in excess of benefits. That these findings are somewhat...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 October 2016) 41 (5): 939–968.
Published: 01 October 2016
...Figure 1 Market Clusters: Excess Demand, Balanced, and Excess Supply Markets Figure 1. Market Clusters: Excess Demand, Balanced, and Excess Supply Markets ...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 October 2005) 30 (5): 869–923.
Published: 01 October 2005
... the nature and consequences of excess body weight. While members of the fat acceptance groups embrace a body diversity frame, presenting fatness as a natural and largely inevitable form of diversity, members of the antiobesity camp frame higher weights as risky behavior akin to smoking, implying that...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1977) 2 (2): 227–256.
Published: 01 April 1977
... excessive. In response, the average length of physician graduate training programs is anticipated to be shortened as more MD and DO graduates enter shorter, general practice residencies. The authors expect that the effects of this projected increase in the supply of physicians may relieve geographic...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1979) 3 (4): 497–518.
Published: 01 August 1979
.... Experience has shown, however, that the promise has often been severely compromised by unethical HMO marketing practices, inadequacy of services and excessive administrative costs. This article examines some of the reasons: the political process which created HMOs, the rhetorical claims which exaggerated the...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1993) 18 (4): 905–925.
Published: 01 August 1993
... excess capacity, it has been unsuccessful in accomplishing this goal. On the other hand, CON policies have, we suggest, been pursued with the implicit aim of “cross subsidization,” that is, regulators have used their power to issue licenses and restrict competition in order to create an incentive to...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1991) 16 (2): 383–395.
Published: 01 April 1991
... remaining embryos or to allow the mother to choose the number of babies she wishes to deliver. Physicians appear to rely on Roe v. Wade in assuming the legality of the procedure, although such an assumption may be erroneous. Rather than continue to implant an excessive number of pre-embryos, the American...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1997) 22 (2): 595–631.
Published: 01 April 1997
... enrollment in managed care plans is likely to increase substantially in coming years regardless of public policy. It is therefore critical for Medicare to pursue policies that protect the quality of care for elderly and disabled patients in managed care plans; curtail excessive payments to HMOs that result...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 2008) 33 (2): 249–279.
Published: 01 April 2008
... consequences of excessive regulation, oversight in this area remains a highly legitimate endeavor for the public, though the public has limited trust in the existing regulatory regime. This distrust stems from many sources, not least of which includes considerable variation, both within and across states, in...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 2009) 34 (4): 509–530.
Published: 01 August 2009
... the single-payer model is that it can lead to excessive health care rationing, particularly in terms of waiting times, although it is argued here that long waits are probably caused by insufficient funding rather than by the single-payer model per se. Moreover, rationing of one form or another occurs...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1982) 6 (4): 653–675.
Published: 01 August 1982
... during the legislative process to grant concessions to a variety of interest groups, particularly the Michigan Hospital Association. Many additional criteria for determining excess bed capacity, some subjective, were added. Cost containment as a goal was, if not subordinated, at least made competitive...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1992) 17 (4): 637–666.
Published: 01 August 1992
... has become a major economic frontier, at which professional and other entrepreneurs successfully seek their fortune. At the same time, the system is leaving increasing numbers of Americans frustrated and disillusioned. It is beset by excess capacity in many areas, is needlessly expensive, and often...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1992) 17 (4): 715–738.
Published: 01 August 1992
... negotiation system that takes place at federal, state, and local levels. The system suffers from some problems, however, which will have to be addressed: the present structuring of hospital and ambulatory care results in excessively long lengths of stay in hospital; drugs are overprescribed; the supply of...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1984) 9 (3): 453–473.
Published: 01 June 1984
... legislature amended the state’s certificate-of-need (CON) legislation to mandate the elimination of excess hospital beds. This unique approach to the problem of excess hospital capacity has been the object of considerable attention from health planners and policymakers outside of Michigan, as well as...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 2012) 37 (4): 677–678.
Published: 01 August 2012
... the United States’ excess health care expenditures. In many market areas, the combination of concentrated provider market power, fragmented private payers, and weak consumer incentives to constrain prices greatly aggravates this problem. A single- payer system might constrain prices...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1981) 5 (4): 588–592.
Published: 01 August 1981
... contained Subsequently,a significant component of excess profits.3 Kesse14 showed how physicians used price discrimination (the practice of charging different prices for the same item to different groups) and other monopolistic practices to increase profits. The drug industry...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1980) 5 (1): 10–24.
Published: 01 February 1980
... payroll tax and general revenue. These are also the tax sources usually proposed for national health insurance (NHI). Such taxes provide no incentive for communities to hold down excessive health care expenditures; i.e., there is no way that a community can decrease its tax burden by its own actions...