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Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 December 2004) 29 (6): 1153–1186.
Published: 01 December 2004
... be considered. This article examines lessons for HIA in the United States from the related and relatively well-developed field of environmental impact assessment (EIA). We reviewed the EIA literature and conducted twenty phone interviews with EIA professionals. Successes of EIA cited by respondents...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 109–110.
Published: 01 February 2002
.... Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV incidence among blood donors is so low that even a perfect test would detect only a handful of new cases. If one must allocate limited HIV prevention resources, p24 screening...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 111–121.
Published: 01 February 2002
.... Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV incidence among blood donors is so low that even a perfect test would detect only a handful of new cases. If one must allocate limited HIV prevention resources, p24 screening...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 122–125.
Published: 01 February 2002
... applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV incidence among blood donors is so...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 125–129.
Published: 01 February 2002
... applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV incidence among blood donors is so...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 130–132.
Published: 01 February 2002
... less cost effective when applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 132–135.
Published: 01 February 2002
... less cost effective when applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 135–139.
Published: 01 February 2002
... standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV incidence among blood donors is so low that even a perfect test would detect only a handful of new cases. If one must allocate limited HIV prevention resources, p24 screening deserves lower priority than many competing interventions. On the...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 139–144.
Published: 01 February 2002
... less cost effective when applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 144–147.
Published: 01 February 2002
... standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV incidence among blood donors is so low that even a perfect test would detect only a handful of new cases. If one must allocate limited HIV prevention resources, p24 screening deserves lower priority than many competing interventions. On the...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 147–150.
Published: 01 February 2002
... less cost effective when applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 150–152.
Published: 01 February 2002
... less cost effective when applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2002) 27 (1): 152–158.
Published: 01 February 2002
... less cost effective when applied to low-risk groups. For example, p24 antigen assay screening of donated blood is estimated to cost $7.5 million per averted infection. Although p24 screen- ing is more sensitive and specific than the standard EIA method in detecting newly infected blood, HIV...