1-20 of 583 Search Results for

admit

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1998) 23 (3): 483–515.
Published: 01 June 1998
... a nationally representative sample of self-employed physicians from 1992, this article presents estimates of the effects of hospital admitting privileges on physician earnings. The results indicate that for nonprimary care specialists with few admitting privileges, gaining an additional privilege...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1980) 4 (4): 675–690.
Published: 01 August 1980
... susceptibility to antitrust remedy: the denial of admitting privileges, third-party reimbursement, and physician backup to nonphysician practitioners. The article concludes with some caveats and admonitions to judges presiding over any cases which arise in this area. Copyright © 1980 by the Department of Health...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1996) 21 (2): 219–241.
Published: 01 April 1996
... were unaware of the study hypotheses. Physicians with greater malpractice experience showed no systematic differences in initial management choice or subsequent test recommendations. For example, similar percentages of internists in the top and bottom claims rate quartiles admitted a patient with...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1986) 11 (1): 41–66.
Published: 01 February 1986
... voluntary admissions, and increasing the likelihood of involuntary admission for individuals previously admitted voluntarily, thus transforming a principally voluntary system into one which was primarily involuntary. Finally, it was found that the increased demand for services mandated by the broadened...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1994) 19 (3): 583–595.
Published: 01 June 1994
... race in admitting patients. This practice is patently objectionable; it also is costly to hospitals, thus to society, since hospitals bear the direct costs of delayed discharges and hospitals do not keep costs to themselves. While research is needed to determine whether the North Carolina findings are...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1983) 8 (1): 99–119.
Published: 01 February 1983
... unambiguous enough to admit of fair, equal, and consistent enforcement? (2) Does it gain compliance, and widespread ideological agreement? (3) Does it enjoy a measure of success in achieving its intended goals? The law of informed consent does not impressively pass any one of these tests. It is deeply...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1991) 16 (1): 119–120.
Published: 01 February 1991
... physician will admit and treat them. They travel because their personal physicians at rural health clinics and community and migrant Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Vol. 16, No. 1, Spring 1991. Copyright 0 1991 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1979) 3 (4): 449–451.
Published: 01 August 1979
... insurance) $225 a day for two days in the hospital and all the expenses of an operating room. After waiting some weeks for a room, I received a call from the hospital several days before I was to be admitted. They were streamlining the admissions procedure and wanted to take a history over...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 April 1998) 23 (2): 402–404.
Published: 01 April 1998
.... Karp admits to making up in depth what he sacrifices in breadth. I would add that he apparently makes it easy for depressed people to talk to him, and he is a fine listener. Karp also discloses the details of his own long-term depression, and is scrupu- lous about admitting to the biases he holds...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 October 2000) 25 (5): 889–897.
Published: 01 October 2000
... concentrate on truly spe- cialized work, rather than competing with generalists for patients. If hos- pitalization is indicated, the physician arranges to have the patient admit- ted. With a few exceptions, physicians are not employed by specific hospitals; rather, they have admitting privileges at one or...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1999) 24 (4): 763–768.
Published: 01 August 1999
... mathematical pretensions of economics, from which many of their methodological tools spring, too much to heart. Admitting that the results of an analytic method can be radically changed by a priori judgments makes the whole exercise seem a lot closer to astrology than to astrophysics, and hardly the stuff...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1987) 12 (1): 194–197.
Published: 01 February 1987
... project. The Book Reviews 195 U. S . Conference of Mayors and the American Medical Association cosponsored the MHSP with the Johnson Foundation. Conservation of Human Resources, the group of researchers responsible for this book, admits that it has...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1985) 10 (1): 195–197.
Published: 01 February 1985
... clinicians greater treatment flexibility, rather than forcing them into certain practice patterns via reimbursement. On the second issue, Upton admits that on balance it is probably better for a relatively broad set of providers to be allowed to compete, rather than restrict the supply to include...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 August 1980) 4 (4): 725–729.
Published: 01 August 1980
... patients and 20 to 40 percent of intermediate care patients are receiving unnecessarily high levels of care. In fact, if nursing homes admitted only people objectively identified as needing nursing home care, the existing bed supply might well be adequate. But two...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 1981) 6 (1): 49–61.
Published: 01 February 1981
... were not available.2 Bed-blocking is perceived as a problem by medical practitioners, hos- pital administrators, government and the public at large. Physicians find their ability to admit new patients re~tricted.~These restrictions limit their capacity to respond to the needs of patients...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1990) 15 (3): 591–605.
Published: 01 June 1990
... man- agers and with thirty-two admitting physicians from medical and surgical spe- cialties. Reports of the individual hospitals and several regulatory agencies aug- mented the information gained through the interviews. 594 Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law The purpose of...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 February 2012) 37 (1): 129–130.
Published: 01 February 2012
... who also support parental choice, and decreasing trust — all at a time when we should be nurturing parental trust rather than further eroding it.” This argument among friends admits no easy resolution. These essays remind us that public health policies easily fail when they do not attract wide...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1994) 19 (3): 497–498.
Published: 01 June 1994
... affect nursing home placement in North Carolina, David Falcone and Robert Broyles come to the disturbing con- clusion that “nursing homes discriminate on the basis of race in admitting patients.” Lois Friss evaluates the long history of efforts to overcome fre- quent nursing shortages, all of...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 2009) 34 (3): 299–300.
Published: 01 June 2009
... providers. The venue for this battle is Japan, and the context is the decision to implement a case-based DRG sys- tem as part of an effort to encourage hospital chronic care units to admit a more disabled patient population. More generally, the goal is to use pay- ment incentives to lead to delivery...
Journal Article
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (1 June 1982) 7 (3): 780–781.
Published: 01 June 1982
... as Chairman of the Committee on Public Health, New York State Bar Association. Elizabeth A. Donahue is a graduate of the State University of New York at Albany, and received her J.D. degree from Albany Law School. Admitted to the New York Bar in 1980, she is presently a sole...