Pain is a distinctly personal experience. However, the significant economic impact of pain and the tendency to view pain through a moral lens transform the pain experienced by individuals into a contentious political issue. The politics of pain involves the questions of who is actually in pain, how much pain is being experienced, who is deserving of compensation or treatment, and how best to treat people in pain while protecting those being treated from the risks of care. These issues are among those explored in Keith Wailoo's new book, Pain: A Political History.

Pain: A Political History focuses on the politics of pain in the United States from the end of World War II to the near present. Political-history buffs seeking information on the politics of pain through the ages may be disappointed in Wailoo's focus on contemporary history; however, most...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.