Given the drastic partisanship on display at nearly every critical juncture of implementing the Affordable Care Act, as well as during and before its passage, Douglas Kriner and Andrew Reeves's finding that public support for Obamacare is strongly predicted by party affiliation will not come as a surprise. What may come as a surprise, however, from their article titled “Responsive Partisanship: Public Support for the Clinton and Obama Health Care Plans” is that the factors explaining public support for health care reform during the Obama administration are the same as those during the Clinton health care reform period. Party identification is the single most powerful predictor in both time periods, and, though less significant, demographic characteristics are also predictive in both time periods. That is, blacks are consistently more supportive, while senior citizens are on average consistently less supportive of reform. Although...

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