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martial arts novel

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Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2018) 5 (1): 119–147.
Published: 01 April 2018
...Yan Liang Abstract This article explores the functions that food, as a narrative trope, has played in the characterization and storytelling of three prominent martial arts novels in late imperial China: Shuihu zhuan 水滸傳 (Water Margin), Sanxia wuyi 三俠五義 (Three Gallant Men and Five Loyal Brothers...
Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2019) 6 (2): 331–358.
Published: 01 November 2019
... outlawed sect is likely not a reflection of the mid-seventeenth-century sectarian practice of White Lotus Teachings. This is because martial arts became a regular practice in White Lotus Teachings only in the eighteenth century. 21 If anything, the novel constituted part of the elite and popular culture...
Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2020) 7 (2): 235–267.
Published: 01 November 2020
... drove him into taking up an eccentric lifestyle as a purveyor of occult arts. See Gong, “Wang Zhongqu mubiao” 王仲瞿墓表 (Funerary Inscription for Wang Tan), in Gong Zizhen quanji , 134–37 ; see also Kong, Baguwen shi , 381–82 . 43. Yu, “Wang Ganchen Gezhi guwei xu” 王幹臣格致古微序 (Preface for Wang...
Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2016) 3 (1): 57–84.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., Yishao's master of martial arts, is happy when he learns about Qionghua's personal traits: “This fellow is not afraid of heaven or earth, nor is he afraid of neither the emperor nor his father. Before he was afraid of only Prince Guo; later Prince Guo left the capital, and he now has no scruples. He...
Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2015) 2 (1): 134–172.
Published: 01 April 2015
... is unusual. Nonetheless, the portrait is comparable with a group of Ming imperial portraits that exhibit the ruler on horseback. David M. Robinson argues that such images of emperors hunting, playing polo, or practicing archery, prized through the sixteenth century, projected martial power and legitimacy...
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Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2019) 6 (2): 412–431.
Published: 01 November 2019
... martial men to fight Wu Zetian's brothers and restore legitimate Tang rule. The seemingly episodic structure of the novel, as I demonstrate in this article, fits in a coherent metanarrative framework when the novel is interpreted as a fiction about fiction making. Tang Ao's venture to those remote...
Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2018) 5 (1): 1–33.
Published: 01 April 2018
... , 2014 . Huang, Martin . “ Dehistoricization and Intertextualization: The Anxiety of Precedents in the Evolution of the Traditional Chinese Novel .” Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews 12 ( 1990 ): 45 – 68 . Lee, Peter . Opium Culture: The Art and Ritual of the Chinese...
Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2019) 6 (1): 96–136.
Published: 01 April 2019
... in relation to the tradition of public service, which ultimately sanctioned his irreverent painting of an emotionally distressed gentleman. The affective power of Chen Hongshou's figural paintings was not recognized in contemporary art writings. However, the author of a personal letter collected...
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Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2018) 5 (2): 411–437.
Published: 01 November 2018
... background of the novel's author, Cao Xueqin 曹雪芹 (also known as Cao Zhan 曹霑, c. 1715–63). Liu Mengxi 劉夢溪, a hongxue scholar at the Chinese National Academy of Arts, stated in 2005 that “the current predicament of hongxue is unlikely to change without the discovery of new sources” and declared...
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Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2016) 3 (1): 26–56.
Published: 01 April 2016
... Niehaihua 孽海花 (1905–7). In that novel, Gong's sudden death just a year and a half after his return south is blamed on poisoning by one of Gu's in-laws. (Some other versions of this story even accuse Lingxiao of committing this deed as an agent of the Manchu aristocracy.) Though most scholars have rejected...
Journal Article
Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture (2017) 4 (1): 160–179.
Published: 01 April 2017
... to the sisters' questions. As if having found her lost but long-desired talent, Qian Xi was especially thrilled by the fact that although she was poor at calligraphy in this life she actually had excelled at this art in her previous life. Although Qian worked to become good at poetry, she failed at calligraphy...