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Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 September 1992) 24 (3): 745–748.
Published: 01 September 1992
... York: Modern Library. Swift , Jonathan. [1728] 1964 . An Answer to a Paper Called a Memorial of the Poor Inhabitants, Tradesman, and Labourers of the Kingdom of Ireland. In Jonathan Swift: Irish Tracts, 1728-1733 , edited by Herbert Davis. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. Jonathan Swift: Father...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 December 1996) 28 (Supplement): 423–425.
Published: 01 December 1996
... M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago, where he served for thirty-eight years. He has devoted a major portion of his profes- sional career to the training of economists from Latin America. His former students include some twenty cabinet ministers...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2005) 37 (1): 79–101.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Cooper 1972, 798 -811. Defoe, D. [1697] 1969 . An Essay upon Projects . Menston, U.K.: Scolar Press. Duke, M. I. 1979 . David Hume and Monetary Adjustment. HOPE 11.4 : 572 -87. Dyson, A. E. [1958] 1973 . Swift: The Metamorphosis of Irony. In The Writings of Jonathan Swift , edited by R. A...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 November 2002) 34 (4): 818–819.
Published: 01 November 2002
...” [133]) but off on specific issues, so that the overall ef- fect is unconvincing. For instance, it is said that the migration of 1726–27 caused Jonathan Swift to write. Is it not more probable that the famine which preceded, and caused, the migration was more responsible? The emigration meant “cheap...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2013) 45 (1): 177–179.
Published: 01 March 2013
... project of 1720–21 for establishing an Irish national bank. He finds evidence for this in two contemporary pamphlets and in the lending practices of the churchmen Jonathan Swift and William King. George Caffentzis examines the writings of George Berkeley to trace the sources of opposition to his...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2013) 45 (1): 179–182.
Published: 01 March 2013
... project of 1720–21 for establishing an Irish national bank. He finds evidence for this in two contemporary pamphlets and in the lending practices of the churchmen Jonathan Swift and William King. George Caffentzis examines the writings of George Berkeley to trace the sources of opposition to his...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2013) 45 (1): 182–183.
Published: 01 March 2013
... categories. Moore claims that Irish clerics were a core source of opposition to the failed project of 1720–21 for establishing an Irish national bank. He finds evidence for this in two contemporary pamphlets and in the lending practices of the churchmen Jonathan Swift and William King. George...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2013) 45 (1): 184–185.
Published: 01 March 2013
... project of 1720–21 for establishing an Irish national bank. He finds evidence for this in two contemporary pamphlets and in the lending practices of the churchmen Jonathan Swift and William King. George Caffentzis examines the writings of George Berkeley to trace the sources of opposition to his...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 2006) 38 (2): 377–389.
Published: 01 June 2006
... Seigel, 208 -18. New York: Barnes & Noble. Spivey, Edward. 1976 . Carlyle and the Logic-Choppers: J. S. Mill and Diderot. In Carlyle and His Contemporaries , edited by John Clubbe, 60 -73. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. Swift, Jonathan. [1729] 1984 . A Modest Proposal. In Jonathan...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1984) 16 (1): 149–151.
Published: 01 March 1984
... press on a variety of issues, including the economic problems of the day, and embarking for the first time on analytical propositions in economics in connection with the subsidization of railways. Jevons’ rise to eminence after 1862 was remarkably swift, especially given the apparent...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 November 2002) 34 (4): 816–818.
Published: 01 November 2002
... and a working class that would not work” [133]) but off on specific issues, so that the overall ef- fect is unconvincing. For instance, it is said that the migration of 1726–27 caused Jonathan Swift to write. Is it not more probable that the famine which preceded, and caused, the migration was more...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 December 2018) 50 (4): 709–733.
Published: 01 December 2018
... Unemployment Debates . Westport : Greenwood Press . Woirol Gregory R. 2012 . “ Plans to End the Great Depression from the American Public .” Labor History . 53 ( 4 ): 571 – 77 . “ WPA Studies ‘Foe,’ The Swift Machine .” 1936 . New York Times . May 31 . ...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2010) 42 (1): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2010
...). (A less conscientious academic became “a club-footed drunk and recidivist bankrupt who occasionally assaulted his colleagues” at the University of Melbourne [96 Of the nonacademics, “James Mirams is a fi ne Australian example of the pseudo- economist who, after a swift perusal of a few economic...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2010) 42 (1): 195–196.
Published: 01 March 2010
...). (A less conscientious academic became “a club-footed drunk and recidivist bankrupt who occasionally assaulted his colleagues” at the University of Melbourne [96 Of the nonacademics, “James Mirams is a fi ne Australian example of the pseudo- economist who, after a swift perusal of a few economic...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2010) 42 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 March 2010
...). (A less conscientious academic became “a club-footed drunk and recidivist bankrupt who occasionally assaulted his colleagues” at the University of Melbourne [96 Of the nonacademics, “James Mirams is a fi ne Australian example of the pseudo- economist who, after a swift perusal of a few economic...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 2010) 42 (1): 198–200.
Published: 01 March 2010
... Melbourne [96 Of the nonacademics, “James Mirams is a fi ne Australian example of the pseudo- economist who, after a swift perusal of a few economic texts, presumes that he can re-invent economic doctrine. . . . [His] fi nal years were marred by his incarceration for malfeasance that came to light on...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 September 1988) 20 (3): 508–512.
Published: 01 September 1988
... our interest to read in the midst of this very modern work, ward Cannan on Jane Marcet or F. Y. Edgeworth on William Playfair or Henry ggs on Philip Cantillon or J. D. Rogers on Jonathan Swift. In addition, the itors have very conveniently included an appendix which lists all those persons...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1988) 20 (1): 85–94.
Published: 01 March 1988
... understood bits and pieces of Political Arith- metick a “neat and well-rounded theory”: not so much with the object of advancing economic science as with that of refuting false doctrine. Hume’s polemic was directed against the “groundless apprehension” of Mr Gee and Dr Swift; Malthus’s against the...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1972) 4 (2): 303–324.
Published: 01 June 1972
... the same or closely related problems, any given discovery is increasingly likely to be made independently more than once. Swift recognition of a multiple is, of course, a function of the efficiency of communication among specialists in the field;12 and in the case under...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1985) 17 (2): 245–264.
Published: 01 June 1985
... arithmetic as depicted in the writings of Graunt, Petty, King, and Davenant did not influence many political economists in the eighteenth century except Cantillon* and to a lesser extent Ste~art.~ Def~e,~Swift,5 and Hume6 were unimpressed. It was not long before Adam Smith announced: “I...