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Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1979) 11 (4): 459–476.
Published: 01 November 1979
... an exam- ple to illustrate his point. Adverting to his previous example in which England could produce 10 yards of cloth or 15 yards of linen with a given amount of labor, Germany 10 yards of cloth or 20 of linen, he supposes that, if the trading ratio were 10 cloth ‘for 17 linen, England’s...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1979) 11 (4): 477–500.
Published: 01 November 1979
... that have appeared since the publication of my Trade Survey (1965). In my Survey I had attributed to Mill the as- sumption that one-half of each country’s expenditure was devoted to each of the two commodities (cloth and linen in Mill’s illustration). Melvin (1969) showed that this special...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2001) 33 (3): 609–626.
Published: 01 September 2001
... numeri- cal examples of trade in cloth and linen between England and Germany, Mill offered an algebraic version of his model. As Henderson (1989, 1996) and Creedy (1989, 1992) point out, this is the only instance in the Principles where Mill used algebraic symbols, and is again suggestive...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1979) 11 (4): 500–504.
Published: 01 November 1979
...-existent linen. Chipman continues to evaluate in- come in terms of linen, despite its non-existence in the world. He finds that, if an equilibrium exists, the price of linen must be either zero or infinity, but shows that neither of these alternatives can in fact exist. We think little...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1982) 14 (4): 496–520.
Published: 01 November 1982
..., and the linen makers of Ireland. These groups were not of equal consequence, but none was ignored. ‘Public opinion’ is not used here to mean what it does today, which is the view of a sample of the population about particular issues. What in this sense the British public believed in 1820 about free...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1989) 21 (1): 43–56.
Published: 01 March 1989
... is price elastic. 34. Mill, Principles, 467. 52 History of Political Economy 21 :I (1989) Elasticity of demand plays a role in Mill’s analysis of international prices and the distribution of the gains from trade. If the price of linen fell, he argued that the increase in the quantity...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2000) 32 (3): 695–696.
Published: 01 September 2000
... of “representative bales,” which are some kind of aggre- gates of the goods exchanged between two trading countries. Unlike Mill’s simple exchange of cloth for linen, the bales import a spurious richness and realism into 696 Book Reviews the discussion, as Marshall was all too wont to do, while from...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1978) 10 (4): 669–678.
Published: 01 November 1978
...- tillon himself, a good econometrician, made estimates of the amount of Land required for the support of a Man according to the different assumptions of his Manner of Living. It will be seen that a Man who lives on Bread, Garlic and Roots, wears only hempen garments, coarse Linen...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1996) 28 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 March 1996
... of inequality. Perhaps even more pointedly, Smith condemns the statutes that grant linen cloth manufacturers export bounties while at the same time encour- aging the importation of foreign linen yarn, which is the raw material for the cloth. The thrust of these policies is to raise the price...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1997) 29 (1): 170–172.
Published: 01 March 1997
... with the Ayr Bank, Ross writes: “ASthe bank got going, there was an economic crisis in Scotland, to which Hume alluded, arising from investments outrunning savings, a fall in the price of commodities such as linen, and a ‘spirit of overtrading”’ (242). This sentence could conceivably make sense...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1988) 20 (2): 324–326.
Published: 01 June 1988
... chapters are devoted to the major economic events of the day, which were the growth in the Scottish linen industry, the growth in Scotland’s impor- tance as a world trading center, and its tremendous advancement in agriculture. It is shown that these economic advances led Scotland from a land...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1994) 26 (3): 465–485.
Published: 01 September 1994
...; and as far as some of them depend, in part or in the whole, upon foreign materials (as in the case with leather, linens, cottons, soap and candles), they may be considered as independent of it; like the two remaining articles of tea and sugar, which are by no means unimportant in their amount...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1997) 29 (1): 167–169.
Published: 01 March 1997
... in Scotland, to which Hume alluded, arising from investments outrunning savings, a fall in the price of commodities such as linen, and a ‘spirit of overtrading”’ (242). This sentence could conceivably make sense, provided one came up with appro- priate (unorthodox) definitions of savings...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1971) 3 (1): 152–169.
Published: 01 March 1971
... of linen while Lmlle preferred silk.1° Of course, Lassalle was familiar with Marx’s ideas; he was the one who persuaded Duncker to publish in 1859 A Contributwn to the Critique of Political Economy, which was 7. I(, Marx, Capital, ccl. C. K. Kcrr, vol. 3 (Chicago, 1909), p. 218. 8. Man...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1999) 31 (Supplement): 31–40.
Published: 01 December 1999
... sculptor, because form is more noble than materials. No painter who paints on bronze, gold, or silver, or uses ultramarine and other precious colors and metals, will be greater than he who works with fragile and poor materials such as panel, linen, and wall, with earth and cheaper col- ors...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1977) 9 (3): 303–321.
Published: 01 September 1977
..., in part or in the whole, upon foreign materials (as is the case with leather, linen, cottons, soap, and candles), they may be considered as independent of. . . [the price of corn], like the two remaining articles of tea and sugar, which are by no means unimportant in their amount...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2021) 53 (3): 389–405.
Published: 01 June 2021
... wherever he could find it. He started man- ufactures in wool, linen, and silk, involved himself in colonization proj- ects in South America, and designed plans for new industrial and manu- facturing projects (Sommer 1925: 1; Roscher 1874: 270; Small 1909: 107; Dittrich 1974: 58; and Wakefield 2009). 396...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1987) 19 (1): 87–106.
Published: 01 March 1987
... of the increasing division of labour as society evolves: “A mer- chant in Glasgow or Aberdeen who deals in linen will have in his warehouse Irish. Scots and Hamburg linen. but at London there are sepa- rate dealers in each of these. The greatness of the market enables one to lay out his whole stock...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1973) 5 (2): 438–448.
Published: 01 June 1973
... diminish ought the consequences to be esteemed so fatal? If the spirit of industry be preserved, it may easily be diverted from one branch to another; and the manufacturers of wool, for in- stance, be employed in linen, silk, iron, or any other commod- ities, for which...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1974) 6 (2): 220–242.
Published: 01 June 1974