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Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1971) 3 (2): 265–277.
Published: 01 June 1971
... a stupendous palace ereclted upon the granite of self-interest. It was not a narrow foundation: “though the principles of oommon prudence do not always govern the con- duclt of every individual, they always influence that of the majority of every class or order.”l The immensely...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 2011) 43 (2): 413–415.
Published: 01 June 2011
..., at the expence of other people, the natural preference which every man has for his own happiness above that of other people, is what no impartial spectator can go along with. Every man is, no doubt, by nature, first and principally recommended to his own care; and as he is fitter to...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1970) 2 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 March 1970
... 123 of the first English printing of Keynes’s General The- ory,l the following sentence appeared : But in every interval of time the theory of the multiplier holds good in the sense that the increment of aggregate demand is equal to the increment of aggregate investment multiplied by...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1981) 13 (1): 161–162.
Published: 01 March 1981
... reference source. The quality of treatment accorded to the various economists referred to is highly uneven. Kalecki is treated in ten lines of text, Schumpeter in twenty lines. (Schumpeter’s History of Economic Analysis, which has a similar scope, pales the book under review in every respect...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 September 2000) 32 (3): 693–694.
Published: 01 September 2000
..., 1999. xvi; 380 pp. $74.95. Whenthe author of one great book, The Golden Age of the Quantity Theory (1991), writes another, it really is too much, and such is the case with the one before us. As every historian of economic thought knows, pre-Keynesian macroeconomics was the quantity theory of...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 September 1975) 7 (3): 372–378.
Published: 01 September 1975
... husbandman, or a weaver, or a builder-in order that we might have our shoes well made; but to him and to every other worker was assigned one work for which he was by nature fitted, and at that he was to continue working all his life long and at no other.”6 This view of economic organization...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 September 1975) 7 (3): 395–396.
Published: 01 September 1975
... responds that this is not the meaning of cooperating with nature. “It is true enough . . . that every human intervention in an eco- system is likely to disturb the workings of that system in a way that is detri- mental to some member of it. . . . But it by no means follows . . . that every...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1969) 1 (1): 4–7.
Published: 01 March 1969
.... Duke Professor of Economics. His performance of every duty reflected his deep sense of equity and his constant faith in his fellow man. It also reflected his kindness and keen interest in Duke students, in their work at Duke, and in their continued growth after graduation. He knew by name...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1979) 11 (1): 157–165.
Published: 01 March 1979
...: 106) is not general, but historical, “concerning the entail- ment of estates in primogeniture.” Marx continues by saying: “Landed property, as it were, continually inherits the first born of the House as the attribute fettered to it. Every first-born in the series of landed proprietors...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1990) 22 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 March 1990
... of the extensive division of labor that character- ize commercial societies are, in Smith’s view, systematic as well as pervasive: “It is remarkable that in every commercial nation the low people are exceedingly stupid. The Dutch vulgar are eminently so, and the English are more so than the...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 November 1988) 20 (4): 688–690.
Published: 01 November 1988
... determined by each and every other process constituting that society” (p. 2). No one property or quality can be said to determine another, since they all determine each other, “constitutively.” So some social processes or qualities cannot be said to be more important than others. That is, Resnick and...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1992) 24 (2): 499–513.
Published: 01 June 1992
... dependency upon voluntary contributions creates for individual clergymen. In this respect, his analysis was guided by a general principle of appropriate rewards to producers which he clearly articulated in the last paragraph of V.i.g.: The proper performance of every service seems to require that...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1976) 8 (2): 309.
Published: 01 June 1976
... orthodoxy, which is concerned with the workings of capitalism; the Marxian, explaining the changing nature of society. But in the categories we have listed, the theories inevitably conflict and old dogmatism reappears. To be sure it is served up u l’anglaise with every effort to be reasonable...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1986) 18 (1): 185.
Published: 01 March 1986
... Playfair’s work, is an important part of the book. Every economist who uses graphs in his work could profit from reading nfte. Beyond that, some who are presently content with econometric equation sets and computer print-outs of nu- merical data might decide that graphics would enhance both their...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 September 1977) 9 (3): 451.
Published: 01 September 1977
...-1950: A Guide to Archive and Other Miinirscript Soirr-ces jor the Histor-y oj’British and Irish Economic Thought. Compiled by R. P. Sturges. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1975. Pp. xxiv + 140. $12.75. Every historian of economic thought will want a copy of...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1988) 20 (2): 332.
Published: 01 June 1988
... criticise the author unfairly for having written one book rather than another. There may yet be room for Adam Smith and the Latin scholastic heritage in the projected series on economic ideas in which this study appears as the second volume. There is every reason to en- courage a translation of...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 2003) 35 (2): 333–334.
Published: 01 June 2003
... of science) has amply explicated and documented, multiples arethe expected rule (Merton 1973). AlfredNorth Whitehead also put it well, asserting in effectthat every great principle was not discovered Ž rst by the one who enunciated it—areductio ad absurdum overshoot imply- ing that everything...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1980) 12 (2): 295.
Published: 01 June 1980
... industrial progress within the framework of industrial capitalism; and that a motley collection of historians, bureaucrats, politicians, and public figures attempted to undermine this firmly established “true” principle of the Constitution. The “monetarists” carried out “every trick in their...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 March 1981) 13 (1): 166.
Published: 01 March 1981
..., who wrote: “But who will lead me into that still more hidden and dimmer region where Thought weds Fact? . . . Does not the way to it pass through the very den of the metaphysician, strewed with the remains of former explorers and ab- horred by every man of science?” The two books...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1 June 1991) 23 (2): 356–357.
Published: 01 June 1991
... could only be obtained by individual effort and self-reliance.” This view carried over to his position on national issues. On reform for the nation as a whole he wrote, “any scheme, however well-intentioned it may be, will indefinitely increase every evil it seeks to alleviate if it lessens...