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Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1979) 11 (4): 606–607.
Published: 01 November 1979
... of corn prices or consumption is present in the Observations. Rashid Beeke and “Giffen good” 607 Utensils for it, their Stomachs are not used to novelties. With us the Consumption of Bread always increases when their Money, if divided, will not purchase...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1992) 24 (3): 749–752.
Published: 01 September 1992
... with a footnote cit- ing Sanger’s review. The Giffen good clearly violates the constancy assumption, for Marshall wrote that “a rise in the price of bread makes so large a drain on the resources of the poorer labouring families and raises so much the marginal utility of money to them...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1998) 30 (3): 469–487.
Published: 01 September 1998
..., and their benefits divided amongst its members. If an improvement, for instance, in the art of Maneschi / John Rae on Trade 473 baking bread were effected, by which, with half the labor and fuel, equally good bread could be produced, it would not benefit the bak- ers...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2006) 38 (1): 1–14.
Published: 01 March 2006
... after 100 of initial corn input gets replaced—to ripen in every next period into, say, 10 units of bread. Bread is stipulated to be the staff of life enjoyed permanently by every income receiver and in Sce- nario I it is only the rentier owners of the capital good corn who do receive any positive...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1990) 22 (1): 145–148.
Published: 01 March 1990
... been verified that Giffen mentioned the paradox (Stigler 1947, 154) nor that he was the first to observe the phenomenon (Eatwell, Milgate, and Newman 1987, 523). This is how Marshall stated the Giffen Paradox: as Sir R. Giffen has pointed out, a rise in the price of bread makes so large...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1980) 12 (2): 300–302.
Published: 01 June 1980
... every month until after the harvest of 1820. And by setting the peg so high, the price of bread rose. To use Hilton’s phrase, the 1815 Act allowed that “agriculture was to be capitalized by protection, baking by competition. Poor [incompetent?] farmers would be cossetted, insolvent bakers...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2001) 33 (2): 315–344.
Published: 01 June 2001
... on the use value; we would not deduce, as many economists have done, the wrong conclusion that a great exchange value can exist without a great use value. We would say that the bread is worth much less than the diamond, even if it is much inferior in terms of utility and we would forget...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1978) 10 (2): 258–270.
Published: 01 June 1978
... of products just de- scribed were chiefly purchased by the working classes. Not only did the laborers individually have a greater preference for wheaten bread, butter, animal food, malt liquor, etc., then the rich, but also, by sheer weight of numbers, their consumption of these goods was what de...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1996) 28 (2): 171–217.
Published: 01 June 1996
... a person buys anything for his own consumption, he generally spends on it a small part of his total resources” (1890, 393; 1920,335). Jevons restricted the constancy assumption to insignificant items like salt or nutmeg. It could not apply to an item like bread. “The price of bread...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1987) 19 (4): 621–638.
Published: 01 November 1987
... For example, the con- 11. Robert Torrens cited Lauderdale’s analysis of the KDPQT and then demonstrated that when the price of corn rises, bread prices and corn spirit prices also rise, but not equiproportionately (Torrens,47-48). This is because Torrens followed Lauderdale...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1993) 25 (4): 677–696.
Published: 01 November 1993
... is deduced. . . . You offer to me a kilogram of bread for twenty pennies. Others for ten pennies will give me two kilograms of potatoes. Since I believe that the utility in the form of two kilograms of potatoes isfor me . . . equivalent to the utility un- der the form of a kilogram of bread...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1970) 2 (2): 316–343.
Published: 01 June 1970
... in the development of the idea has been overlooked. He said a decrease in the quantity supplied of ‘bread,say 50 percent, will cause a rise in price of a magni- 35. Price of Corn, pp. 94-95. 36. Price of Corn, pp. 98-99. 37. See, e.g., Wealth. of Notions (New Pork, 1937), p. 57, and Marshall...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1996) 28 (3): 329–357.
Published: 01 September 1996
..., and then of the whole amount, and of what remains over and above the land and the servants, set the sum in writing, and according to that assign the expenses of your household in bread and ale. Also see how many quarters of corn you will spend in a week in dispensable bread, how much in alms...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1987) 19 (1): 107–126.
Published: 01 March 1987
...' a theoretic:il short-run demand function; however. Jevons's curve WIS long-run. Cf. Jenkin 193 I. I7- 18n. See also Mays on Jevons's scientific method. Dostaph adShidi - Jevons's curve 111 Figitre 2 times as much as bread. But we have...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2003) 35 (Suppl_1): 74–100.
Published: 01 December 2003
... two bushels of seed per acre, and this had to be held back from the meager harvest for the following year. In this period, bread was figuratively “the staff of life.” Barley, however, was frequently malted and made into beer to improve its palatability. Altogether, the four grains (barley, oats...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1977) 9 (3): 303–321.
Published: 01 September 1977
... of the labour- ing classes of society, we shall find, that it by no means consists wholly in food, and still less, of course, in mere bread or grain. In looking over that mine of information, for every thing relating to prices and labour, Sir Frederick Morton Eden’s Work on the Poor, I...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2000) 32 (1): 1–38.
Published: 01 March 2000
... of economics and economic calculation, first demonstrating a marginal utility cal- culation of the demand for salt and creating a demand curve out of it. Said Dupuit, “The cal- culation that we have applied to salt could have been made for meat, bread, diamonds, and all...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1978) 10 (4): 669–678.
Published: 01 November 1978
...- tillon himself, a good econometrician, made estimates of the amount of Land required for the support of a Man according to the different assumptions of his Manner of Living. It will be seen that a Man who lives on Bread, Garlic and Roots, wears only hempen garments, coarse Linen...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1991) 23 (1): 41–59.
Published: 01 March 1991
... instrument of commerce, every particular commodity is more frequently exchanged for money than for any other commodity. The butcher seldom carries his beef or his mutton to the baker, or the brewer, in order to exchange them for bread or for beer; but he carries them to the market, where he exchanges...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1969) 1 (1): 123–149.
Published: 01 March 1969
... experienced in modern times, if not during her recorded history. Wheat and other crops were either killed or seriously damaged. Though barley was generally planted in the spring where wheat had been lost in the winter, grain prices soared.’ Heroic efforts were made to control the price of bread...