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bettering our condition

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Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2019) 51 (4): 731–751.
Published: 01 August 2019
...John Pullen A well-known and fundamental element in the population theory of Thomas Robert Malthus is the concept of prudential or moral restraint. A less well-known but just as fundamental element is the “desire of bettering our condition,” also described by Malthus as the “ vis medicatrix...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2014) 46 (1): 55–83.
Published: 01 March 2014
... . Raphael D. D. Macfie A. L. . 1976 . Introduction to The Theory of Moral Sentiments . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Rasmussen D. R. 2006 . “ Does ‘Bettering Our Condition’ Really Make Us Better Off? Adam Smith on Progress and Happiness .” American Political Science Review 100...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2010) 42 (1): 155–192.
Published: 01 March 2010
... of Moral Sentiments tells us that such coordination is embed- ded in the desire for social approbation (as the wish to better our condition will ensure that we will never destroy any surplus). This coordination is an equilibrium of needs but not necessarily of wants. 1. The Modern Narrative...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1976) 8 (4): 478–493.
Published: 01 November 1976
... in Chapter 111 of Book I1 and later repeated four times, there are references to “the desire of bettering our conditions When Smith introduces this second propensity, he declares that it “comes with us from the womb, and never leaves us till we go to the grave. In the whole interval which...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2005) 37 (2): 197–203.
Published: 01 June 2005
... imagines. Kirkaldy Smith imagines that we are guided by a multiplicity of sen- timents, one of which is self-love. In Kirkaldy Smith’s moral philoso- phy, our self-love motivates us to better our condition. That spring for human action, given human reason and human frailty, puts humankind...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1987) 19 (2): 239–259.
Published: 01 June 1987
..., the ultimate catalyst in the transition from agricul- ture to manufacturing was a principle of human nature. In Adam Smith, the “desire to better our condition” promoted savings at the expense of and inspired optimal economic growth by maximizing the size of the ratio of productive...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1986) 18 (2): 187–235.
Published: 01 June 1986
... ventured to take so important a step. That great vis rnedicutrix reipublica?, the desire of bettering our condition, and the fear of making it worse, has been constantly in action, and has been constantly directing people into the right road in spite of all the dec- lamations which tended...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2015) 47 (3): 363–394.
Published: 01 September 2015
... . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Rasmussen Dennis C. 2006 . “Does ‘Bettering Our Condition’ Really Make Us Better Off? Adam Smith on Progress and Happiness.” American Political Science Review 100 ( 3 ): 309 – 18 . Recktenwald Horst Claus . 1978 . “An Adam Smith...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1999) 31 (2): 237–254.
Published: 01 June 1999
... are automatically invested by all but pathological misers (338). The “desire of bettering our condition” is universal, and the best and most obvious way to do that is to save and accumulate (343), so net sav- ing, and hence growth, is normal. Waste by governments diverts saving from productive investment...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2012) 44 (3): 471–492.
Published: 01 September 2012
... of that incentive to better our condition (I.iii.2.1/50–51). This “desire of bettering our condition” paradigmatically exemplifies the characteristic restlessness of all desire because, as the well-known passage in the Wealth of Nations continues, this desire comes “with us from the womb and never leaves us...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1978) 10 (2): 271–285.
Published: 01 June 1978
... to consider of the means of supporting a family before he ventured to take so im- portant a step. That great vis medicatrix reipublicae, the desire of bettering our condition, and the fear of making it worse, has been constantly in action, and has been constantly directing people...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2001) 33 (4): 697–716.
Published: 01 November 2001
... of bettering our condition and the fear of making it worse” (2:257). There was no requirement that the present generationshould behave altruistically or evencooperatively. The pre- ventive check would be in each family’s self-interest. There was no need to rely uponaltruism or uponcooperation...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1972) 4 (1): 176–206.
Published: 01 March 1972
... of the MoraE Sentiments deduces his almost Veblenesque explanation for “ that great purpose of human life which we call bettering our condition” (p. 71). Ma- terial self-betterment or the accumulation of palpable riches by a person affords to others the most direct and easiest evidence...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2003) 35 (2): 269–304.
Published: 01 June 2003
... to sustained growth, he emphasizes that the necessary savings will be am- ply supplied by individuals acting in their own self-interest, driven by in- nate psychological propensities. “The principle which prompts to save,” Smith ([1776] 1976, 341) says, “is the desire of bettering our condition, a desire...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1974) 6 (3): 278–304.
Published: 01 September 1974
... exchange ensued. G. F. McCleary recounts it very well and summarizes the re- sults.62Senior and Malthus agreed that the rate of growth of the popu- lation depended on the relative strength of “the passion between the sexes” and “the desire of bettering our condition.” They disagreed about...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1984) 16 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 March 1984
... the worst possible case, classical economists generally did not view the powers of government as so far-rea~hing.~Say represents a case in point. Say, while like BB he perceived anarchy as a limiting condition, acknowledged the possibility that even anarchy could offer markedly better prospects...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2010) 42 (4): 723–746.
Published: 01 November 2010
... in mind. Even so, it is a step and it indicates an important development of emphasis in Chalmers. We can illustrate this better by extending our run-up to the subject. The agriculturalist Arthur Young, in An Enquiry into the State of the Public Mind amongst the Lower Classes and on the Means...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1988) 20 (4): 565–581.
Published: 01 November 1988
... of interest How sensitive is optimal period of production to the real rate of interest p? Differentiate our first-order condition (1 0) implicitly with respect to p treating y as a function of p and find the simple elasticity or, in English, the elasticity of optimal period of production...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (1999) 31 (Supplement): 85–120.
Published: 01 December 1999
... it was produced. Ruskin emphatically argued that there was no enjoyment to be had from products made under mod- ern factory conditions. According to Ruskin, the factory system oblit- erated the better part of the workman—his “thoughtful part,” his genius. This, Ruskin argued, was just what was cherished...
Journal Article
History of Political Economy (2003) 35 (1): 21–48.
Published: 01 March 2003
... of capital. Indus- try, indeed, provides the subject which parsimony accumulates. But whatever industry might acquire, if parsimony did not save and store up, the capital would never be the greater” (WN, II.iii.16). 19. “But the principle which prompts to save, is the desire of bettering our condition...