This introduction traces the connections between economics and psychology that were explored in a 2015 conference on the subject held at Duke University. Over much of the past half-century, sporadic attention has been given to the possible links between economics and psychology, though recently there has been a steady rise in the numbers of both psychologists and economists interested in behavioral economics. From both disciplines have come behavioral challenges to the strong version of rational choice thinking. And, along with them, have come challenges to the challengers to relate their observations to mathematical models, as favored by economists, and to explain how people come to make the choices that they do.

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