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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (2): 382–383.
Published: 01 May 1970
...Phillip Althoff In the Fist of the Revolution. Life in a Cuban Country Town . By Yglesias José . New York , 1969 . Vintage Books . Pp. 307 . Paper. $1.95 . The Youngest Revolution: A Personal Report on Cuba . By Sutherland Elizabeth . New York , 1969 . The Dial...
Image
Published: 01 February 2004
Figure 19 The youngest sons frame this urban family; their erect pose and fedoras serve as a counterpoint to the peasant hats and hunched shoulders of the boys in figure 6 . Figure 19. The youngest sons frame this urban family; their erect pose and fedoras serve as a counterpoint More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (1): 180–181.
Published: 01 February 1972
...’ In the Fist of the Revolution: Life in a Cuban Country Town (New York: Pantheon, 1968) and Elizabeth Sutherland, The Youngest Revolution (New York: Dial, 1969), this new book by Reckord serves as the kind of literary reporting that allows those denied the opportunity to visit Cuba nevertheless to capture...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (2): 370–371.
Published: 01 May 2000
... historical background, reminiscences, and some commentary; his youngest brother, Richard Herr, who was born in 1922, provides additional material and the oversight of a trained historian. Fear for personal safety led to Luella’s returning with her children to the United States on several occasions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (2): 337–339.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., the youngest and westernmost of the Sonoran border towns in his study, which was a largely informal settlement as late as the 1920s but became a hub for American tourists and curio seekers particularly during the post–World War II era. Arreola concludes his study by highlighting the commonality of certain...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (1): 137–139.
Published: 01 February 1973
... struggles of Liberals and Conservatives as José Antonio Páez’s decade of stable autocracy gave way to an era of political strife. By 1854, with the youngest slaves at age thirty-three and already declining in value, with out-of-power Conservatives promising emancipation as a political ploy...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (4): 814–816.
Published: 01 November 2006
..., Poniatowska (“the victims’ confidant”) and Monsiváis — the two youngest in the group — positioned themselves on the Left, giving voice to the Tlatelolco student protesters, the Zapatisas, and other outsiders seeking social justice. Interestingly, unlike many others on the Left (inside and outside Mexico...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2021) 101 (2): 325–326.
Published: 01 May 2021
..., followed his brother to court, where he accumulated multiple lucrative offices. He later became a plenipotentiary minister to Prussia and then Russia and finally counselor of state, dying in 1792 on his way back to Spain. The treatment of Antonio, the youngest brother, whom José positioned...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (2): 346–348.
Published: 01 May 2010
... famous husband Augustus as they carried out archaeological and photographic explorations of places such as Chichén Itzá and Uxmal. The book sandwiches her diary of adventures in Yucatán (1873–76) between more conventional biographies of her earlier and later years. Alice was the youngest daughter...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1974) 54 (3): 533–535.
Published: 01 August 1974
... . . . whenever necessary.”) Consequently, Sebreli finds the Anchorenas with the Spanish against the patriots, with the English against the Argentines, siding in turn with Dorrego, Rivadavia, Rosas (“their majordomo”), then Urquiza, Mitre, Roca and so on. (The final chapter ominously reports that the youngest...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2021) 101 (2): 323–324.
Published: 01 May 2021
... period. The youngest of nine, Rebouças was born to a Portuguese father and a free Black mother. He completed a primary education and taught himself the requirements to practice law. He edited a newspaper in Bahia in the late 1820s and reviewed plays for the Brazilian Dramatic Conservatory in Rio de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 453–480.
Published: 01 August 1993
..., and Panchimalco were baptized. What is more interesting in these rulers’ households, however, is that in a number of cases not all members were baptized. The Huitzillan tlatoani ’s household comprised 20 people, 11 of whom were baptized. Six of his 8 children were baptized; only the youngest 2 were...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1946) 26 (4): 561–563.
Published: 01 November 1946
... himself and his two bastard sons, Martin and Luis. Even though both of the children had been legitimatized in 1529, it seems a little odd that they should have received any consideration in this matter. To be sure, I think Luis, the youngest one, was not a mestizo like his brother, Martin. His mother...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (4): 717–722.
Published: 01 November 2016
... for the Industrial Workers of the World. When they married, they moved at Fanny's insistence to New Jersey, where Solomon worked as a dishwasher. Sid was the youngest of four children and the only boy. Solomon prospered in the 1920s and opened a restaurant, but the Depression hit hard, and he became a cook. Fanny's...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2004) 84 (1): 83–111.
Published: 01 February 2004
...Figure 19 The youngest sons frame this urban family; their erect pose and fedoras serve as a counterpoint to the peasant hats and hunched shoulders of the boys in figure 6 . Figure 19. The youngest sons frame this urban family; their erect pose and fedoras serve as a counterpoint...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2020) 100 (4): 623–654.
Published: 01 November 2020
... in ages among free godparents. The youngest godfather was Diego Colón, who was 13 on May 25, 1739, when he sponsored Antonia, the daughter of Jacinto Báez, a slave who belonged to Juan Ximénez Báez, and María Molina, a morena libre (free black). 60 The oldest godfather was Rafael Pérez, a mixed-race...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (4): 621–641.
Published: 01 November 1972
... vessels going to America with flour and hardtack. In some documents he is also mentioned as a merchant or as a cambiador (banker). To protect the family interests, he made one condition: that Cristóbal, the youngest of the three Guerra brothers, should be the captain. Niño did not object, nor did...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (2): 239–247.
Published: 01 May 2016
... life. Sonia, among the youngest, said, “Juan es muy muy atrasado [backward], muy machista, muy sexista.” We foreigners suggested that Juan was intentionally subverting officialdom, propriety, and the invasion of his privacy. We felt that chunks of his narrative were meant to be humorous, black...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (1): 29–62.
Published: 01 February 2011
... Such critiques missed the family dynamics that made wet nursing a logical choice in the context of straitened circumstance. Significantly, Casa letters suggest that many of the wet nurses who placed infants there had other children. 56 The birth of the youngest could occasion a crisis but also constitute...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (3): 673–685.
Published: 01 August 1991
.... Her greatest coup was the marriage of her youngest daughter to the silver magnate Pedro Romero de Terreros, but even this advantage was to prove temporary. Her family survived as an aristocratic unit, but it did not truly prosper. Couturier believes that without Spanish inheritance laws...