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witchcraft

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1934) 14 (4): 490–494.
Published: 01 November 1934
...Fernando Ortíz Voodoos and Obeahs. Phases of West India Witchcraft . By Williams Joseph J. S. J. ( New York : Lincoln MacVeagh, The Dial Press , 1933 . Pp. xix , 257 . $3.00 .) Copyright 1934 by Duke University Press 1934 ...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (4): 729–731.
Published: 01 November 2022
...Nicole von Germeten Women, Witchcraft, and the Inquisition in Spain and the New World . Edited by María Jesús Zamora Calvo . New Hispanisms: Cultural and Literary Studies . Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press , 2021 . Figures. Notes. Bibliographies. Index . vii, 214 pp...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (4): 698–699.
Published: 01 November 2005
...Susan Schroeder Hall of Mirrors: Power, Witchcraft, and Caste in Colonial Mexico . By Lewis Laura A. . Latin America Otherwise: Languages, Empires, Nations . Durham : Duke University Press . 2003 . Map. Notes. Bibliography. Index . viii , 262 pp. Cloth , $79.95 . Paper...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (2): 386–387.
Published: 01 May 2007
... of ignorant rustics. In this transition, Mello e Souza argues, Portugal followed in the trail of changes taking place throughout Europe. Witchcraft went from dangerous Satanism to object of ridicule. While reconciling some of the contradictions found in the earlier dichotomization, this ridiculing functioned...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (4): 696–698.
Published: 01 November 1990
..., the multifaceted quality of religion. The second theme is that witchcraft ( feitiçaria ) was an integral part of colonial life. Sixteenth-century European magic fused with African and Indian components. The author characterizes Catholicism of late medieval Europe as “imperfect,” a meld of Christianity and paganism...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (2): 311–312.
Published: 01 May 2008
.... Index . xvi , 344 pp. Paper , $21.95 . Copyright 2008 by Duke University Press 2008 From 1756 to 1766, the town of Abiquiu, New Mexico, found itself at the center of a witchcraft outbreak rivaling events in Salem, Massachusetts, less than a century before. Though the episodes of witchcraft...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (4): 785–786.
Published: 01 November 1970
... principales , may now make political decisions concerning new relations with non-Indian groups. Simultaneously, cooperatives provide a device for at least partially countering the fear of witchcraft, for their members fully appreciate that they socialize the risk of making a profit. “The organization...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2005) 85 (3): 497–499.
Published: 01 August 2005
... forms of curing, and understandings of witchcraft amply document African practices. Moreover, African culture profoundly influenced Portuguese masters, who routinely turned to African healers and acknowledged the power of African spirits. (In the 1730s, even a priest admitted that exorcism had no effect...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2024) 104 (2): 183–212.
Published: 01 May 2024
... and comadres eagerly sought out prayers, potions, and ritual cures to help attract a desirable marital match, tame an abusive husband, distract a possessive partner, or stimulate a lover's generosity. 4 Social histories of American Inquisition trials against witchcraft ( brujería ) show that people...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1991) 71 (1): 167–168.
Published: 01 February 1991
... was through sexual witchcraft—casting spells, preparing contaminated foods, or making charms designed to attract men, to take vengeance on them, or to render them impotent. Maria Beatriz Nizza da Silva and Richard Boyer uncover the sexual politics of marriage by analyzing those marriages that ended in trials...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (3): 562–564.
Published: 01 August 1996
... . Copyright 1996 by Duke University Press 1996 Diana Luz Ceballos Gómez’ book studies the intellectual impact of the Inquisition in the Kingdom of New Granada, exploring particularly the effects of European notions of diabolical witchcraft on the “medico-magical practices” of colonial Indians...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2015) 95 (3): 523–524.
Published: 01 August 2015
... was a carryover from the precontact period that was then reinforced after the arrival of European outsiders who had clear gender notions about who should wield power. In a subsequent chapter, Brown examines the alternative paths to power available to commoner women and men through sorcery and witchcraft...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (4): 554–567.
Published: 01 November 1964
... into the following classifications: Blasphemy 260 Heretical statements 72 Scandalous or evil words or deeds 117 Administering sacraments 41 Disrespect to Inquisition or Church 67 Lutheranism 118 Jews 378 Calvinists 15 Solicitation 98 Witchcraft and sorcery 114 Bigamy...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (1): 192–193.
Published: 01 February 1972
... that befell the eight Yaqui pueblos along the Río Yaqui after the Revolution. The narrative reads very smoothly, with little critical content. Through the author’s personal participation in Yaqui fiestas , his profound belief in and respect for Yaqui witchcraft, and his detailed description of day...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (4): 639.
Published: 01 November 1965
... of nausea, but speaking as he does about an “age” he should have kept his subject matter less isolated from other similar, contemporary phenomena. To quote Max Dimont we have to keep in mind that “Even as Jews accused of ritual murder were hauled to the stake, Christians accused of witchcraft were burned...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2003) 83 (2): 295–344.
Published: 01 May 2003
... provides the moral context for drawing the lines between concern and indifference, in-group humanity and collective inhumanity.” 59 In accord with Evans-Pritchard’s classic work on the subject, denunciatory accusations could be termed witchcraft in two senses: they represented apprehension created...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (1): 163.
Published: 01 February 1975
.... They were taken in Brazil and in West Africa, but are not so identified here. The book’s primary value lies in being a testimonial, a source of anecdotes and recipes. A strenuous attempt is made to link santería with astrology, yoga, cabala, witchcraft, and other trends in the occult revival...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1976) 56 (3): 483–484.
Published: 01 August 1976
... between Basques, Castilians, Andalusians, and Creole elements of society, of brutal murders, mayhem, rape, of cruel mothers who torture erring daughters, of the endangered species of beautiful virgins, of witchcraft, and the like. Of especial interest is the tale “Claudia the Witch” because of its...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (3): 505–506.
Published: 01 August 1990
... of regional politics. Whether the topic is courtship, witchcraft, business, or drinking, kinship holds the stage, for conflict and violence over resources call for, and are derived from, family alliances and feuds. Don Fortino’s explanations about violence in Juquila compare well with those provided...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (3): 513–514.
Published: 01 August 1997
... with Satan and of witchcraft were exceptional. The triangle composed of the priest, the cacique, and the hechicero provoked, continued, and finally subverted the idolatry trials. The priests used them as part of the repression against Indians who resisted the priests’ economic demands. The caciques...