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wine

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 361–391.
Published: 01 August 2008
...Pablo Lacoste Abstract This article examines the role of entrepreneurial women in colonial Mendoza, a trade and transport center characterized by wine production. In other economic activities, such as cattle raising and transportation, female ownership of the local means of productions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1962) 42 (4): 612–613.
Published: 01 November 1962
...Donald E. Worcester Encyclopedia of Bullfighting . By Conrad Barnaby . Boston , 1961 . Houghton Mifflin Co . Illustrations. Bibliography . Pp. 269 . Wine, Women & Toros. The Fiesta de Toros in the Culture of Spain . By Kehoe Vincent J-R . New York , 1961...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (2): 225–226.
Published: 01 May 1964
...J. Fred Rippy The Wine is Bitter: The United States and Latin America . By Eisenhower Milton S. . New York , 1963 . Doubleday & Company, Inc . Index . Pp. xiv , 342 . $4.95 . Copyright 1964 by Duke University Press 1964 Doctor Eisenhower has trapped his reviewers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (4): 746.
Published: 01 November 1981
...Keith A. Davies Lords of the Land: Sugar, Wine and Jesuit Estates of Coastal Peru, 1600–1767 . By Cushner Nicholas P. . Albany : State University of New York Press , 1980 . Maps. Figures. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index . Pp. x , 225 . Cloth. $39.00 . Paper. $12.95...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (4): 788–789.
Published: 01 November 1999
... Anyone browsing the wine section of markets from Manhattan to Melbourne these days will be tempted by a wide array of fancy-labeled cabernet, pinot, merlot, sauvignon blanc, fumé, chardonnay, or syrah from Chile. Until just a few years ago, most of us, if we could find them in this country, had to settle...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1982) 62 (1): 138–139.
Published: 01 February 1982
... sources, the author sheds new light on the origins and activities of the General Company of the Cultivation of the Vine of the Upper Douro, the most successful of the crown monopolies initiated by Pombal. As Schneider shows, the company was primarily established to protect the great noble wine growers...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2002) 82 (1): 129–130.
Published: 01 February 2002
... of agriculture in Mexico. This long familiarity and widespread use led to fermentation of the sugary heads. Mescal wine was the most widely used alcoholic beverage, but, at the time of the conquest, it was the preferred drink of only one group, the Cora. Bruman meticulously documents the geographic range...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2007) 87 (2): 407–408.
Published: 01 May 2007
... patterns. Cariocas consumed alcoholic drinks like wine, aguardente , cachaça , and beer. Whereas aguardente enjoyed consistent popularity during the nineteenth century, demand for beer rose only starting in the 1870s. He concludes that as consumers drank less Portuguese (and sometimes also French...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (4): 613–632.
Published: 01 November 1977
..., tobacco growing, and cane alcohol production developed. Victor Martín de Moussy reported that the wine industry of Cuyo, long stagnant, had begun to show signs of new life after 1855. 9 There were other indications of increased economic activity in the 1850s and 1860s. The demand for passenger...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 357–359.
Published: 01 August 2008
... and lifelong friend of Liberal commander and future president Porfirio Díaz. She opened her first store in the 1860s and was soon a major importer and retailer, traveling to the United States and Europe to seek out suppliers of cloth, wine, crystal, glassware, and other products. By the 1880s she had...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1984) 64 (4): 791–793.
Published: 01 November 1984
... contribution. By law, one-third of cargo space was reserved in theory for a broad range of Andalusian agricultural exports; in fact, only wines and brandies were shipped, and there was a decline in wine volume, 1680-99, counterbalanced by a surprising rise in brandy shipments. Significantly, New Spain appears...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (2): 255–275.
Published: 01 May 1983
... of processors of three depressed commodities critical to the gaúcho economy: charque , wine, and lard. 32 Many gauchos believed prices were low because they were forced to sell immediately after harvest when large supplies glutted markets and because Center-South merchants controlled marketing...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (1): 51–89.
Published: 01 February 1985
... the beginnings of an internal market in the dominated areas. We have few data on the entrance of Mediterranean brandy and wines into the River Plate region, 24 but, from what we know from other regions of Hispanic America, like Mexico, we can glimpse the important role that these products played...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1995) 75 (3): 476–477.
Published: 01 August 1995
... of foreign or Portuguese authors who have further explored themes he originally brought to scholarly attention. These include the Portuguese economic crisis born of declining bullion yields from Brazil; and the diminishing value of exports such as cane sugar, tobacco, and wine. The author insists...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1986) 66 (2): 384–385.
Published: 01 May 1986
... before the conquest. Davies attributes the distinctive elements primarily to geographical circumstances—particularly the limited amount of irrigable and cultivable land in the valleys where Spaniards settled—and to the peculiar characteristics of the wine economy. As he shows, the initial land grants...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (4): 727–729.
Published: 01 November 1977
...) and the monograph of Manuel Burga, “De la encomienda a la hacienda capitalista. El Valle de Jequetepeque del siglo XVI al XX” (IEP, Lima, 1976). They help to complement the picture highlighting, even more, the great variety of the rural society. In Arequipa, wine growing was not enough to preserve the chacra...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 557–558.
Published: 01 August 2008
... grapes for wine and olives for oil. How much of a market there was for wine and olive oil in the United States in the second decade of the nineteenth century could be questioned, but other issues played a more important role. For the grantor, the United States government, the willingness to place...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1973) 53 (4): 677–678.
Published: 01 November 1973
... the structural “orchestration” of the islands’ economies in the 15th century), then a couple of chapters (III and IV) on Madeira and its wine exports, three (V, VI, VII) on the Azores, and finally two chapters (VIII and IX) on the Cape Verdes and their slave trade. Professor Duncan is ever urbane and chatty...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 190–191.
Published: 01 February 2012
..., half of the provincial population lived in the capital. San Juan was dominated by a powerful conservative wine-making elite, which kept close control over politics in the province. This elite cared little about the working and living conditions of the common folk, a status quo only challenged...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (1): 121–122.
Published: 01 February 2008
.... In the Spanish world, too, there was an everyday empiricism that grew out of local experience. It yielded recipes for turning red wine into white wine and white men into black, and promised cures for syphilis and bowel disorders, as we see in the medieval and early modern Spanish books of secrets, almanacs...