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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 152–154.
Published: 01 February 2015
...Pablo F. Gómez Violent Delights, Violent Ends: Sex, Race, and Honor in Colonial Cartagena de Indias . By von Germeten Nicole . Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press , 2013 . Notes. Bibliography. Index. xi, 304 pp. Paper , $29.95 . Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2011) 91 (2): 383–385.
Published: 01 May 2011
...Irene Depetris Chauvin Violent Democracies in Latin America . Edited by Arias Enrique Desmond Goldstein Daniel M. . The Cultures and Practice of Violence . Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2010 . Illustrations. Tables. Notes. Bibliography. Index. vii , 324 pp. Paper...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2003) 83 (2): 421–423.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Rachel Sieder Dictating Democracy: Guatemala and the End of Violent Revolution. By rachel m. mccleary. Gainesville: University Press of Florida,1999. Photographs. Figures. Appendixes. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xxii, 297 pp. Cloth, $49.95. 2003 by Duke University Press 2003 Book Reviews...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 403–436.
Published: 01 August 2012
...Benjamin Cowan This article takes up the story of right-wing mobilization before and during Brazil’s military government of 1964–1985. Understanding the regime’s violent countersubversion requires analysis of the ideology that framed it. This ideology flourished among a long-neglected group of far...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 573–604.
Published: 01 November 2018
... period immediately after a series of violent inquisitional acts in the mid- and late 1520s and late 1530s. The issuing of such an order by a member of the Tlaxcalan political elite is a clear example of a carefully implemented act of long-term indigenous agency, aimed at constructing and extending the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2013) 93 (2): 205–238.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Alex Borucki The experience of enslaved Africans in the Atlantic crossing redefined the meanings of the nomenclature emerging from the slave trade. Under violent conditions, captives developed networks with shipmates on board slave vessels. These ties survived for decades if shipmates stayed...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2010) 90 (4): 661–695.
Published: 01 November 2010
... support for the democratic regime on one hand and violent antiestablishment opposition on the other to mobilize the state around their demands. In particular it considers how residents seized on new discourses of accountability and participation emanating from political elites to lend their protest...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2019) 99 (1): 139–140.
Published: 01 February 2019
... struggle over them in the context of colonial expansionism—both Spanish and Anglo-American—from the late eighteenth century to the early twenty-first. Property, Correia argues, is both a legal object and a social relation, often violent, between groups and individuals regarding rights over the use and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 750–752.
Published: 01 November 2017
... . Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 The Logic of Compromise in Mexico is an unusually innovative reassessment of post-1930 peasant struggle for social and economic justice and its relationship to an increasingly violent and institutionalized form of authoritarianism. Gladys McCormick...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 175–177.
Published: 01 February 2018
..., more specifically, their decision to take French existentialism only as a starting point, without pretending or desiring to carry out a faithful interpretation of the original, now canonical texts. By performing a creative, “violent reading”—defined by Sánchez as an act of appropriation for a...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 763–764.
Published: 01 November 2016
... communities, and the institutions of representative democracy has been fraught: the area became a hotbed for urban guerrilla warfare during the violent political cycle of the 1960s under the Betancourt and Leoni administrations, and after the pacificación of President Rafael Caldera, community activism on...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 731–733.
Published: 01 November 2018
.... Nonetheless, the very existence of such projects strongly supports Hamnett's deep periodization of imperial breakdown. Part 2, the book's argumentative center, examines the unruly and violent decade unleashed by the imperial crises of 1808–9, including the formation of juntas and the Cádiz Constitution...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 February 2015
... protect his sister from the abuses of her employer. This sense of a contested belonging among de la Garza's peers is particularly striking, as Valerio-Jiménez unflinchingly describes the violent displacement and genocidal outcomes wrought by an expanding cattle-ranching and mining economy in the northern...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 722–724.
Published: 01 November 2014
... book recounts the history of the last half century in Colombia, focusing on the violent contention between the Colombian state, Marxist-inspired guerrillas, and right-wing paramilitary forces. Author Marco Palacios, a Colombian historian now based at the Colegio de México, is at pains to place his...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 599–600.
Published: 01 August 2016
..., as the United States received alcohol during Prohibition, Mexican rebels received guns and ammunition. Such informal economies are still part of the US-Mexican borderlands today. The author demonstrates how smuggling activities had great costs on both sides of the border, such as violent encounters...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 157–159.
Published: 01 February 2015
... undisputed notion, defined in this book as autonomy, could have guided almost everyone involved in New Spain's emancipation — a process that, among other things, began with a coup d'état, extremely violent between 1810 and 1814, evinced a very profound ideological complexity since its inception (as authors...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 759–761.
Published: 01 November 2016
... complicated by economic and cultural ties between Italy and Argentina and by violent politics at home. There are fewer explicitly comparative and cross-national essays here than one might hope; still, part of the benefit of the collection is that it indicates just how useful that approach might be. For...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 576–578.
Published: 01 August 2017
... 1960s. Young Venezuelans, inspired by the Cuban Revolution, engaged in guerrilla warfare and urban terrorism, creating havoc and suffering in the country. The United States supplied over $60 million in credits and grants for military equipment and training to aid in the fight against the violent Left...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 537–539.
Published: 01 August 2014
... omitting reference to tactics employed by the opposition, the editors fail to consider political contexts. Certainly, in cases of an opposition that engages in violent and disruptive tactics (as has occurred in Venezuela and elsewhere) or has consistently failed to recognize government legitimacy, the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 358–359.
Published: 01 May 2015
.... Five of the book's eight chapters examine Thomas Picton's notorious tenure as military governor of Trinidad from 1797 to 1801. Picton's violent exploits in Trinidad during his five years as governor—particularly his role in the torture of 14-year-old free mulatto Louisa Calderon—have been well...