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vanilla

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1948) 28 (3): 360–376.
Published: 01 August 1948
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (1): 168–170.
Published: 01 February 2006
... perspective of the Tomochic uprising, also in Chihuahua. Emilio Kourí’s A Pueblo Divided adds greatly to our understanding of the period. Next to Tomochic, perhaps no other Porfirian-era conflict is more often referenced. Yet Papantla, a vanilla-producing region in north-central Veracruz state, remains...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1961) 41 (2): 321.
Published: 01 May 1961
..., B. Ames, D. March, D. Tibbits, E. Smith, and others. This is a definitive work on one aspect of Andean flora, yet in the words of the author “it is a starting point for work on the floras of neighboring countries.” Interesting to studious hobbyists are descriptions in Phragmipedium, Vanilla...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 487.
Published: 01 August 1993
... of natural and social history to describe American contributions to global food systems. The foods selected for discussion include the well-known beans, chilies, chocolate, maize, potatoes, tomatoes, and vanilla; discussion of the lesser-known grains amaranth and quinoa and several of the secondary...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1995) 75 (2): 264–265.
Published: 01 May 1995
... to harvest cacao and vanilla. Fontana, Florescano, Stern, and Quijano criticize the use of force in effecting or maintaining converts; Milhou characterizes the Spanish friars’ approach as a “pedagogy of fear (p. 280). Urbano finds Las Casas’ approach more sympathetic, but singles out the Counter-Reformation...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (1): 43–76.
Published: 01 February 2018
... reconstruction promised. Site workers expressed their frustrations by openly demanding higher salaries. 34 Whereas they should have been paid Mex$6 according to the legally established minimum wage in the region, they in fact only received Mex$4. 35 In response to repeated complaints that even vanilla...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (4): 720–721.
Published: 01 November 2010
... “commodity” profiles, this book is different for two reasons. First, rather than a botanical product of high visibility (cocaine, vanilla, coffee), it chronicles the hidden, unsuspected role of a native root, barbasco , in the modern pharmaceutical industry. Indeed, barbasco’s story proves so compelling...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (3): 578–579.
Published: 01 August 2011
... and the commodity chains of the products themselves. She wisely groups products by the amount of processing and infrastructure they required. Some goods that were little consumed domestically, like rubber, vanilla, and orchids, involved a process of gathering with few linkages or increased efficiencies...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (1): 147–149.
Published: 01 February 2019
.... First, how determining was silver capitalism for New Spain's core region? It is hard to imagine Spanish colonizers turning away from Mesoamerica's human capital and failing to tap the commercial potential of cochineal, tobacco, chocolate, vanilla, indigo, and other natural resources by other means...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1965) 45 (4): 625–628.
Published: 01 November 1965
... of minor importance by copper, rubber, lead, cattle, chick-peas, and chewing gum. Only henequen, coffee, vanilla, and untanned hides remained relatively stable throughout. Imports also grew continuously during the regime, emphasis being placed principally upon those items which would eventually result...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (3): 463–494.
Published: 01 August 1999
... and the center of a prosperous vanilla trade, had a tradition of political unrest. Riots rent the community in 1735, 1762, 1764, 1767, and 1787, earning the villagers a well-deserved reputation as a troublesome people. 1 Although the mostly Totonac-speaking inhabitants of the region did not immediately...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (2): 213–244.
Published: 01 May 2012
... other than bananas were exported; the intrepid map reader could find vanilla, cacao, and coconuts. This could lead to discussions about native versus nonnative crops and where most vanilla is produced today (Madagascar) and why. Along almost every major river system the Higley map shows “Emery’s...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2022) 102 (2): 191–221.
Published: 01 May 2022
..., vanilla, gums, resins, cotton, and tobacco) marketed under a state monopoly, but the profits were largely seized by priests and administrators, who simultaneously increased coercion of Indigenous laborers. 30 Indigenous peoples were dissatisfied with the priests' government. Disregarding the loyalty...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1976) 56 (2): 217–240.
Published: 01 May 1976
..., Kontinental’naia blokada i Rossiia (M.-L., 1966), pp. 42-44. A varied selection of products reached the Russian market from Brazil, including cacao, tapioca, vanilla, cinnamon, clove, pepper, rum and tropical woods. Brazilian sugar was available to Russian consumers in white, refined and brown powder...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2000) 80 (1): 113–136.
Published: 01 February 2000
..., and in the Caratasca Lagoon region procuring vanilla, silk grass, annatto, and other natural resources, extant documents do not mention dyewood cutting among their activities. 16 Still, it is likely that the first European settlers along the Mosquito Shore and in the Bay of Honduras were connected in one way...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (3): 597–629.
Published: 01 August 1999
... life during the Porfiriato. Kourí then discussed the case of Papantla, and showed how the growth of vanilla cultivation and trade led to land competition and conflict, social divisions and communal strife, dissidence and rebellion, and, ultimately, to a militarized privatization of village lands...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2002) 82 (3): 469–498.
Published: 01 August 2002
... was developed through the drogas do sertão (drugs of the wilderness): cocoa, vanilla, sarsaparilla, urucum, cloves, andiroba (Guyana crabwood), musk, amber, ginger, and piassava. There was also turtle fishing. Coins only began to circulate in Grão-Pará in the mid-eighteenth century. In the previous century...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (4): 649–680.
Published: 01 November 2019
.... For Yucatan and Chiapas, see Rugeley, Yucatán's Maya Peasantry ; Washbrook, Producing Modernity . 13. For neighboring, vanilla-exporting Papantla, see Kourí, Pueblo Divided . 12. The term “infrastructural power” was coined by Mann, “Autonomous Power.” 11. For Oaxaca, see Chassen-López...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (1): 23–60.
Published: 01 February 1989
... industriousness in agriculture, mentioning diverse native fruits, cotton, achiote, patlaste , and, surprisingly, vanilla and cacao among the cultigens complementing the production of maize. 68 In the windy, arid climate of Tehuantepec, most of these plants would flourish only in sheltered irrigated fields...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1989) 69 (2): 185–219.
Published: 01 May 1989
... groves giving human shape and dimension to a land once covered in semitropical forests. Moreover, the Swiss scientists found manor houses—civilized, comfortable, and open—surrounded by garden parks planted in cacao, vanilla, and palm trees, where majestic peacocks held sway. High in the Colombian Andes...