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twine

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (1): 165–166.
Published: 01 February 2014
...Andrew R. Graybill Smugglers, Brothels, and Twine: Historical Perspectives on Contraband and Vice in North America’s Borderlands . Edited by Carey Elaine and Marak Andrae M. . Tucson : University of Arizona Press , 2011 . Photographs. Tables. Notes. Index. x, 250 pp. Cloth...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (3): 545–547.
Published: 01 August 2009
...Christopher R. Boyer Bound in Twine: The History and Ecology of the Henequen-Wheat Complex for Mexico and the American and Canadian Plains, 1880 – 1950 . By Evans Sterling . College Station : Texas A&M University Press , 2007 . Photographs. Maps. Tables. Figures. Notes...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (4): 555–592.
Published: 01 November 1992
... the Yucatecan economy before 1904, and it emphasizes the constant concern of U.S. firms to maintain quality twine and diversify both usable fibers and sources of supply. It details the changes that mark 1902-1903 as the end of an era for Yucatán’s henequen economy; and it analyzes the interplay between...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1982) 62 (2): 224–253.
Published: 01 May 1982
... for binder twine, which was manufactured principally from the fibrous (henequen) agave grown in Yucatán, henequeneros speculated freely with joint-stock shares of regional banks, railways, and industry. The aim of this study is to analyze and amplify our impressions of an entrepreneurial ruling class...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1971) 51 (4): 709–710.
Published: 01 November 1971
... examines the question of its origin and traces its use from the time of Columbus to the present. For at least four and a half centuries the plant, more commonly called sisal in the United States, has been grown and harvested in Yucatan for use in the manufacture of rope, twine, and coarse bagging materials...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1983) 63 (1): 208–209.
Published: 01 February 1983
... to develop economically. Joseph agrees with some Mexican intellectuals that the movement had to be brought in from without for Yucatán to experience revolution. The realities of the old regime for various reasons precluded local initiative. Henequen, the monocrop of Yucatán processed to make binder twine...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2016) 96 (2): 404–406.
Published: 01 May 2016
... henequen was of great use for bailing twine in the age of the McCormick reaper, henequen's importance vanished with the rise of other natural fibers and, finally, synthetic ones. The ways in which chocolate was produced and traded did not resemble the economic course of the sugar beet. Trade in some other...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (4): 739–756.
Published: 01 November 2014
..., Brothels, and Twine: Historical Perspectives on Contraband and Vice in North America's Borderlands , 165 Carmagnani, Marcello, The Other West: Latin America from Invasion to Globalization , translated by Rosanna M. Giammanco Frongia, 686 Castañeda, Luis M. (R), 154 Celebrating Insurrection...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1985) 65 (1): 111–134.
Published: 01 February 1985
... knotting device for the McCormick reaper-binder (1878) revolutionized the grain industry and expanded demand for fiber and twine geometrically. The production of henequen increased furiously in the Yucatán during the Porfiriato, when annual exports rose from 40,000 bales of raw fiber to more than 600,000...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1992) 72 (2): 159–209.
Published: 01 May 1992
... horse and the region’s monocrop, henequen (sisal), a fibrous agave plant used first for cordage and rigging and later in the manufacture of binder twine for North American and European markets. Yucatán’s new infrastructure, like its counterparts throughout Mexico, was a catalyst for far-reaching...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1976) 56 (4): 605–629.
Published: 01 November 1976
... were located on the waterfront for easy deposit of products arriving by river vessels. The largest warehouses held up to 80,000 hides and contained bags, rawhide twine, and tools for packing. Hydraulic presses for baling export products reduced the size of bulk goods and saved on overseas freight...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (4): 649–679.
Published: 01 November 2014
... of the rules. 77 In stark contrast, El Anti-Toque, as a modern-day Pychaichi, constituted an embarrassment to himself and the company. He fished in the Paraná River using twine, pawned his badge and helmet in the brothel to pay for sex, was detained at the security guard station because he did not have his...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (3): 427–454.
Published: 01 August 2008
... twine for use by the machine. Yucatán’s henequen planters sold the fiber almost exclusively to the United States, and consequently, much of the financing of the production and sale of henequen happened through American brokers, who made advance payments to local trading houses. Before local banks began...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1995) 75 (3): 405–440.
Published: 01 August 1995
..., and cheesecloth. The Aycinena store stocked luxury items, essentials, and articles for everyday use. It supplied thread, buttons, twine, ribbons, braids, tapestries, and chintz. Sombreros of all qualities, other types of hats, shoes, petticoats, reams of paper, cinnamon, floorcloth, bedspreads, huipiles, stirrups...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2009) 89 (1): 3–39.
Published: 01 February 2009
... (Salvador da Bahia: EDUFBA/CEAO, 2002). 6 Michael George Hanchard, Orpheus and Power: The Movimento Negro of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Brazil, 1945 – 1988 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univ. Press, 1994); France Winddance Twine, Racism in a Racial Democracy: The Maintenance of White Supremacy...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (1): 107–141.
Published: 01 February 2012
..., and Zephyr Frank, eds., From Silver to Cocaine: Latin American Commodity Chains and the Building of the World Economy, 1500 – 2000 (Durham, NC: Duke Univ. Press, 2006); Sterling Evans, Bound in Twine: The History and Ecology of the Henequen-Wheat Complex for Mexico and the American and Canadian Plains...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1990) 70 (4): 539–577.
Published: 01 November 1990
... capacity. They were also exporting baler twine to the United States as a raw material for hay packers. 112 After this initial success, Trujillo tried to sell to Gadala María a glass factory that he had likewise built with state funds and which was losing more than $100,000 per year because...