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treaty

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Published: 01 August 2014
Figure 3. “A Map of a Part of Yucatan”: the Faden Map of Belize, 1787, Biblioteca Nacional de España. An upper zone (pink in the original) shows the region between the Belize and Hondo rivers where British logging was permitted in the 1783 treaty; a lower zone (yellow in the original) shows the More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2005) 85 (3): 449–484.
Published: 01 August 2005
... some rightful form and manner irrevocably linked to our own, but how and how far is for the future to determine in the ripeness of events.”1 The “form and manner” of U.S.-Cuban relations would be codifi ed in two measures: the Platt Amendment of 1901 (later embodied in a permanent treaty...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 353–354.
Published: 01 May 2014
... contribution to a historiography too often fixated narrowly on the Havana-Washington axis. The earliest clash of interests emerged in the first few years after the US occupation. British diplomats cautiously discouraged Cuba from signing the treaty of trade reciprocity with the United States, seeking...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 716–717.
Published: 01 November 2015
... rights to land. Adopting the metaphor of an archipelago of “islands” in a ”sea” of unoccupied land, Herzog argues that territorial expansion was discontinuous; there was no “line or a front or even an amorphous area” (p. 42). Before colonization began, the Treaty of Tordesillas (1494) attempted to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 368–369.
Published: 01 May 2016
... recently signed Treaty of Paris and the danger posed by the United States, and it advocated for the establishment of a kind of Hispanic confederation, with Spanish infantes assuming thrones in Mexico, Peru, and Costa Firme and with the Spanish king becoming emperor. No original copy of the document has...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 137–139.
Published: 01 February 2018
... years of “unjust depredations” and growing tensions, as contraband activity by independent merchants and others increased at the expense of the monopoly arrangements. The South Sea Company and the Spanish government in Madrid struggled to adhere to formal treaty obligations, but smugglers glutted the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 540–542.
Published: 01 August 2014
... developed a formidable military force, and the British army built an impressive fort on the Apalachicola River. After the Treaty of Ghent ended the War of 1812, the British formally withdrew from Florida, but only after Nicolls signed unauthorized treaties with the Seminoles and Red Sticks and gave...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 197–199.
Published: 01 February 2016
..., Spain's envoy to the United States, published a pamphlet in Philadelphia detailing the history of the colony of West Florida. Spaniards had explored there in the sixteenth century. France and Britain had taken parts of the region as the result of various wars and treaties. Most recently, with Britain's...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 599–600.
Published: 01 August 2016
... that subverted the nation-state, highlighting tariff collections and the gun and drug trade. Díaz's work begins with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, which ends the US-Mexican War, and moves on to the Mexican Revolution and World War I, ending with World War II. The author states that...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2016) 96 (3): 445–480.
Published: 01 August 2016
..., Portuguese and Spanish administrators sought relationships with tolderías in the region as a means to declare territorial possession. Before the 1750 Treaty of Madrid, many jurists recognized the legitimacy of indigenous land claims, including those of communities who fished, herded, or hunted. 46...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 743–744.
Published: 01 November 2016
.... Historian Eliga Gould labeled such conduct as searching for “treaty-worthiness” (p. 6). The use of eight national archives is especially impressive in such a short book (the body of the text is just under 200 pages). Exhibiting diligent research, Gaffield examines Admiralty cases from various places, but...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 358–359.
Published: 01 May 2015
... poisoning conspiracy. In the decades between the Seven Years' War and the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1814, Britain garnered eight new colonies in the Caribbean. These recently acquired territories, Candlin maintains, constituted an unstable “Caribbean frontier at the edge of empire” (p. xxii). In contrast to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 368–369.
Published: 01 May 2015
... American hegemony. American interest in Colombia's natural resources, especially its petroleum potential, brought a belated congressional ratification of the Thomson-Urrutia Treaty in 1921, which finally resolved Colombia's loss of Panama and stabilized its relations with the northern colossus...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 762–763.
Published: 01 November 2017
...). Dividing and titling chapters according to region is well suited for this objective. The book is about frontier history during very important historical periods for both the United States and Argentina. The US Southwest had just been added to the Union after the US invasion of Mexico and the Treaty of...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 767–768.
Published: 01 November 2017
... treaty possible. She is an unsung heroine of diplomatic internationalism whose work literally might bring fresh air and cooler temperatures to our world. Alan McPherson and Yannick Wehrli present in their anthology the professional ancestors of such Latin American diplomatic internationalists. In the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 February 2015
..., an additional benefit of American law. This picture of divorce in South Texas highlights how women expanded some public forums for private issues even as access for Mexican men to US federal officials, electoral participation, and state agencies shrank in the wake of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 697–698.
Published: 01 November 2014
... commercial treaty with Britain. Both benefited the British and effectively broke the Portuguese monopoly over Brazil. The residence of the court in Rio de Janeiro had consequences for Brazil and Portugal, but Paquette does not see it as revolutionary or as leading to a break. Rather, the Portuguese...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 196–197.
Published: 01 February 2016
... had retained that land—at least in part—under the Mexican government (p. 245). The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo guaranteed that all citizens of Mexico—including Pueblo Indians—were to retain their property. The result was that Pueblo Indian communities were ultimately assigned free title to their lands...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2016) 96 (1): 199–200.
Published: 01 February 2016
... fears. According to Doolen, the government declared US neutrality during the uprisings in Spanish America in exchange for aggressive moves by the Spanish against potential independent Anglo republics. With the ratification in 1821 of the Transcontinental Treaty, which gave the Floridas to the United...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 556–557.
Published: 01 August 2015
... surveys, in addition to studying the interesting shifts in the history of monuments and markers at the boundary. But the book starts long before the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and problematizes the notion of beginning at the moment of division. Drawing on original research and on the work of...