1-20 of 26 Search Results for

totonac

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1938) 18 (1): 114–126.
Published: 01 February 1938
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1953) 33 (3): 393–395.
Published: 01 August 1953
...Charles Gibson The Tajin Totonac. Part I. History, Subsistence, Shelter, and Technology . By Kelly Isabel and Palerm Angel . [ Smithsonian Institution, Institute of Social Anthropology, Publication No. 13 .] ( Washington : Government Printing Office , 1952 . Pp. xiv , 369...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2006) 86 (1): 168–170.
Published: 01 February 2006
... dominated by indigenous Totonac subsistence farmers until the mid – nineteenth century. Abundant land allowed Totonacs to maintain traditional communal agriculture, supplemented by small-scale collection of wild vanilla. After the 1860s, however, liberal land reform and increasing demand for the flavoring...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (2): 296–297.
Published: 01 May 1997
... of an attack on a Totonac fortress and the assumed victory of Cipactli, who is later seen as Lord of Xicotepec. The subsequent events are related to his rule: a Totonac rebellion, other enemies, and the arrival of Aztec warriors. From 1492 to 1497 a new Lord of Xicotepec, Coatl, appears. The remainder...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (1): 160–162.
Published: 01 February 1999
... Comprising previously unpublished essays based upon original research by both historians and anthropologists, this collection explores the historical processes that shaped and transformed the Totonac region of Veracruz over the course of two hundred years. Although primarily defined linguistically...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1963) 43 (2): 273–274.
Published: 01 May 1963
... area, and the treatment reverts from this to the Chichimec and Toltec periods, to the Theocratic cultures (principally Teotihuacán, Zapotec, and Totonac), and thence to the Archaic cultures of the Valley of Mexico, the west, and the Olmec regions. It concludes with an account of relations between...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (4): 729–731.
Published: 01 November 2018
... by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They would have likely provided more evidence for the author's treatment of Afro-Papantecos' ties to the region's indigenous Totonac community. Finally, Frederick too often conflates race with ethnicity, something that I would argue the indigenous subjects...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (1): 59–74.
Published: 01 February 1968
... to dissipate the clouds of praise surrounding the Conquest. One need consider but three examples in Prescott’s History of the Conquest of Mexico which might have benefitted from the critical observation of a Las Casas: Cortés’ winning over of the Totonacs in Cempoalla, the seizure of Montezuma...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (3): 414–415.
Published: 01 August 1967
... to sustain to some degree the integrity of the Indian community. After Independence and assignment of land to individual Indians, mestization and essentially complete loss of the Totonac language followed promptly. The character and content of this volume may imply more about modern Mexican intellectual...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (1): 43–76.
Published: 01 February 2018
... and debris almost impossible, but also with a shortage of drinking water and the continuous winter rainfall. Likewise, finding a local indigenous workforce that fulfilled his expectations of competency turned out to be difficult. Characterizing the work of Totonacs as “inadequate and unprofessional,” García...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (3): 471–472.
Published: 01 August 1968
... such as the Huaxtecs and the Totonacs continued their normal activities . . .,” and that “the same applied to the Mixtecs.” The next page states that “apart from the plateau of Mexico the only place to suffer serious destruction . . . seems to have been the deep forested region of the Peten.” There seems to be little...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (1): 127.
Published: 01 February 1993
... are identified with Mexico City; and two are Totonacs from around El Tajín in Veracruz. Most of the other research was done in Veracruz and Puebla. Scant attention is paid to the areas usually most associated with the Día de los Muertos —the state of Oaxaca and the region around Lake Pátzcuaro in Michoacán...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (3): 463–494.
Published: 01 August 1999
... and the center of a prosperous vanilla trade, had a tradition of political unrest. Riots rent the community in 1735, 1762, 1764, 1767, and 1787, earning the villagers a well-deserved reputation as a troublesome people. 1 Although the mostly Totonac-speaking inhabitants of the region did not immediately...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1962) 42 (1): 103–104.
Published: 01 February 1962
.... Kelly and A. Palerm, “The Tajín Totonac,” Smithsonian Institution, Institute of Social Anthropology: 13, 1952). Often the results not only confirmed the conclusions drawn by Cook and Simpson, but also foresaw some of those now set forth by Cook and Borah—for example, that preliminary estimates...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 490–491.
Published: 01 August 1993
... Veracruz, in the tombs of the Totonacs, mirrors were buried to guide the dead through the under-world. In Las Meniñas , Velázquez paints mirrors seemingly to reflect his subjects and observe them. So Fuentes' book looks from the Americas to Spain and back, using the mirror as a reflection of reality...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1966) 46 (1): 83–84.
Published: 01 February 1966
... peripheries, their careful documentation from paper, stone, and clay, gives solidity to their conclusions—far beyond, one may point out, the European attempts to connect combat dances with pre-Christian sacrificial rites. The Totonac, Maya, Aztec, and Colima evidence is still with us. The drawings...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2002) 82 (1): 129–130.
Published: 01 February 2002
... of plant sources and the native groups who fermented them: sahuaro wine (Northern Mexico-Arizona/Papago, Seri); tesgüino , beer from sprouted maize (Sierra Madre Oriental, Tarahumara, Huichol); prickly pear and mesquite wines (arid central Mexican plateau, Otomi); cornstalk wine (Totonac); pulque...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (3): 617–618.
Published: 01 August 1996
... enthused the young to defy stifling traditions in their own communities and to seek full participation in any new national project being planned by elites and their accomplices. In Mexico, where the author draws her examples from Nahua- and Totonac-speaking villages in the northern sierra of Puebla...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1967) 47 (4): 549–552.
Published: 01 November 1967
... are many of the dates too early, but also the objects are unjustifiably associated with historic linguistic groups (e.g. “Chontal-Guerrero” or “Maya-Totonac”). A similar error also appears in the text, where, for example, the Mixtecs are said to have physically populated Cholula, whereas they merely shared...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (1): 172–176.
Published: 01 February 1977
... and of the management of Jesuit estates, of the alcaldes mayores by Horst Pietschmann. At some point, also, Günter Vollmer’s comprehensive study of the region’s population should appear. For the present there is Wolfgang Marschall’s little study (Vol. IV, Beiträge ) of a marginal area. It describes the Totonac...