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tlaxcalan

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1970) 50 (1): 165–167.
Published: 01 February 1970
...Nathan L. Whetten San Bernardino Contla. Marriage and Family Structure in a Tlaxcalan Municipio . By Nutini Hugo G. . Pittsburgh , 1969 . University of Pittsburgh Press . Maps. Charts. Tables. Notes. Appendices. Glossary. Bibliography. Index . Pp. xii , 420 . $14.95...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1987) 67 (4): 706–707.
Published: 01 November 1987
...Bernardo García Martínez The Tlaxcalan Actas: A Compendium, of the Records of the Cabildo of Tlaxcala (1545-1627) . By Lockhart James , Berdan Frances , and Anderson Arthur J. O. . Salt Lake City : University of Utah Press , 1986 . Maps. Tables. Illustrations. Appendix...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2024) 104 (2): 329–330.
Published: 01 May 2024
...-Mexican borderlands. However, in practice, most of the project focuses on a much narrower set of historical cases: the Chichimec wars of the sixteenth century, the subsequent Tlaxcalan settlement of San Esteban (in today's Coahuila), and the later seventeenth-century Mesoamerican migrations to New Mexico...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2018) 98 (4): 573–604.
Published: 01 November 2018
... of the period immediately after a series of violent inquisitional acts in the mid- and late 1520s and late 1530s. The issuing of such an order by a member of the Tlaxcalan political elite is a clear example of a carefully implemented act of long-term indigenous agency, aimed at constructing and extending...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1962) 42 (4): 558–568.
Published: 01 November 1962
..., for their abuse of Indians and for setting a bad example. In order to assess the significance of this decree, we should give consideration both to the general segregation legislation issued for New Spain and to the peculiar Tlaxcalan background. 1 From the latter part of the sixteenth century the Spanish...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1997) 77 (3): 522–523.
Published: 01 August 1997
... contemporary Mexquitic, the structure of both the town and the society it contains, all to set the stage for the ethnographic investigation. The next chapter relates the founding of the town by the relocation of Tlaxcalan Indians in the 1590s, as the ending of the Chichimeca wars pacified the north. Four...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1966) 46 (1): 114.
Published: 01 February 1966
..., Durango, and Torreón, once an oasis of marsh, lake, and streams flanked on three sides by unfriendly desert. At the beginning of the colonial epoch the native Indians, called Laguneros , were mixed with Tlaxcalans whom the Spaniards moved up to pacify the uncertain northern provinces. In the nineteenth...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1971) 51 (1): 138.
Published: 01 February 1971
... Spain, and the Tlaxcalan documents could doubtless be matched by similar documents elsewhere. The materials are valuable for comparative tabulations of acreages and other data, and the editor, Isabel González Sánchez, provides such tabulations as well as maps, indexes, and photographs of surviving...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (1): 125–126.
Published: 01 February 1981
... goes far toward demonstrating rather than simply declaring the Zapatista base in the countryside masses. Unfortunately, few Náhuatl Zapatista documents exist. Indeed, the only ones found thus far were precipitated by the crisis that developed after the killing of Tlaxcalan agrarista Domingo Arenas...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (1): 202–203.
Published: 01 February 2010
... (and the Tlaxcalans?) as potential partners with or through whom to advance their own agenda. Because there is not an existing indigenous version of events, we cannot be sure how local indigenous people felt about the arrival of the Spaniards and Tlaxcalans, but it is dangerous to read current realities back onto...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1975) 55 (3): 624–625.
Published: 01 August 1975
... by Duke University Press 1975 A “microdemography” of a colonial Tlaxcalan parish, this University of Montreal thesis combines a scholarly critique of its parish register and ecclesiastical census sources with detailed analyses of demographic data. Morin discovers two major epochs: the period 1646...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1981) 61 (3): 588–589.
Published: 01 August 1981
...-Columbian Aztecs and Tlaxcalans; railroad systems and social networks; colonial demography and social services; Náhuatl soil glyphs and pre-Columbian cultivation of musa; tropical savannas in Peru and edges of tropical ecosystems in Sonora; the relaciones from South America; and geographers’ views...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2014) 94 (2): 167–206.
Published: 01 May 2014
... with the intention of evoking an earlier era. Kelly McDonough distinguishes “three pillars” among the discursive and performative strategies by which seventeenth-century Tlaxcalan elites asserted their claims to political legitimacy; although Tlaxcalans considered themselves exceptional, these strategies can...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1996) 76 (4): 777–778.
Published: 01 November 1996
.... Andrea Martínez Baracs contributes a sharply focused critical essay that clarifies the origin and dating of the manuscript and points out some of its more interesting and valuable features. Dated to 1588-89, the orthography of the Suma y epíloga matches that of the great Tlaxcalan chronicler Diego...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1966) 46 (3): 320–321.
Published: 01 August 1966
... as: the possible relationship between Mexican independence from Spain and the lingering desire of the Aztecs to be free once again; the belabored argument that the conquest of Mexico was a true conquest rather than an effective alliance between Cortés and the Tlaxcalans. (After all, as we are needlessly...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1979) 59 (4): 712–713.
Published: 01 November 1979
... series. On a hill in southwestern Tlaxcala one can see (in a single panorama) the great pyramid of Cholula to the south, the fortified Post-classic Tlaxcalan site of Tepeticpac to the north, and the recently opened site of Cacaxtla immediately to the east. Cerro Xochitecatl is that hill...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (1): 204–205.
Published: 01 February 2010
... Grande and the Rio Puerco in New Mexico, the Spanish governor of the province awarded Fernando Durán y Chaves this large land grant as compensation for his service in suppressing the Pueblo Indian Revolt of the 1680s. Spaniards and their Nahua-speaking Indian allies, the Tlaxcalans, had been in the area...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (4): 702–703.
Published: 01 November 2011
... was a wicked man. Guzmán was brutal to his indigenous enemies and — a much more serious strategic error — cruel to his Tlaxcalan allies as well. By the time the Mixtón rebellion erupted in 1540, Guzmán had been removed from office. But his legacy of violence lived after him, depriving settlers of much needed...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1977) 57 (3): 528–529.
Published: 01 August 1977
...) or repetitive cyclical view, reflects quite clearly a progression of political ambition from heirs to rulers and to a sequence of secular goals, i.e., conquest (inner = geschichtliche Zielsetzung). She shows how the surrender of Moctezuma was interpreted respectively as an excuse for the lack of Tlaxcalan...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1972) 52 (4): 656–657.
Published: 01 November 1972
... role of Zacatecas in the colonization of the North. The high earnings offered in the mining industry attracted an ample flow of Indian laborers—Tarascans, Mexicans, Tlaxcalans and Texcocans—who settled outside the town in separate tribal hamlets. The urban population consumed as much wheat as maize...