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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2017) 97 (1): 95–129.
Published: 01 February 2017
... challenged this open-door policy, culminating with the 1969 nationalization of Gulf Oil's properties by the military regime of Alfredo Ovando Candía. Ironically, though, the nationalization was driven partly by the same conservative logic that had animated the MNR's liberalization, in that Ovando favored...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2015) 95 (1): 37–69.
Published: 01 February 2015
...Valeria Manzano Abstract This essay explores how a drug problem was manufactured in Cold War Argentina. Unlike in some of its South American neighbors, in Argentina most authorities until the late 1960s did not believe that the country had a serious drug problem, though previous episodes regarding...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2008) 88 (1): 71–106.
Published: 01 February 2008
... surveyed the valley defined the population as criollo, that is, non-indigenous. The article demonstrates that, even though a certain creolization process did take place among the Calchaquí people during the nineteenth century, labeling them as criollos was a discursive operation manipulated by academic...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2010) 90 (3): 455–488.
Published: 01 August 2010
... concept is a key to a better understanding of the history of Spanish America during the years that followed the crisis of the monarchy—a long period of instability judged traditionally as an age of anarchy and void of any political norms. On the contrary, the new sovereign, though fragile, governments...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2012) 92 (4): 603–635.
Published: 01 November 2012
... decades of the nineteenth century, cattle raising in both countries became increasingly intertwined through commerce. Though this trade was clearly international, as it entailed crossing a political border between nations, we argue that it was also an interregional commerce between contiguous, similar...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (1): 33–65.
Published: 01 February 2013
... spirituality suppressed activities there after 1745 because they saw the devotion as excessively Indian and Baroque. The shrine has served as a barometer of eighteenth-century Bourbon reforms even though its story has not been fully told. This article explores the politics of patronage in the years after...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (3): 411–449.
Published: 01 August 2013
... the common treatment of racial identification as a fixed and self-evident determinant of social status or behavior, we treat it as a flexible social outcome. We find that though white identification is largely shaped by skin color, it is also shaped by national context, social status, and age. We discover...
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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2013) 93 (4): 621–657.
Published: 01 November 2013
... intermediaries between popular subjects and the imperial state. Moral indebtedness was one racialized means by which various constituencies sought to craft or accommodate (in the case of authorities) a more inclusive political project that did not contradict the basis of imperial rule—even though it did alter...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (3): 445–468.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Steven Palmer Abstract The paper reassesses the model of scientific success on the periphery advanced in Nancy Leys Stepan’s analysis of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in Beginnings of Brazilian Science by looking at a comparable, though ultimately less successful, bacteriological research facility...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2021) 101 (4): 756–757.
Published: 01 November 2021
... studies. In this sense the volume's contributors seek to focus on the particularities of national host sites as well as the “diasporic perspective” of, say, Italians in Argentina and Brazil (pp. 3–4). Though the volume successfully fulfills this goal, this is not an entirely new approach; it goes back...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2011) 91 (3): 540–541.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Martina Will De Chaparro Though largely centered on historical case studies, this volume is extremely relevant as the present political and social debates over race and classification in the United States and Mexico intensify. In his insightful essay “Race and Erasure: The Hernandez v. Texas...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1998) 78 (1): 149–150.
Published: 01 February 1998
... It’s no secret that since the 1970s cocaine export booms have fundamentally altered Andean states, social relations, and peasantries. Still, there is little research that traces the historical origins of Latin American drug trades, though much is known (or speculated) about their dramatic repercussions...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (2019) 99 (4): 745–746.
Published: 01 November 2019
... thereof) as a thinker and politician, and his relationships with figures ranging from Justo José de Urquiza to Domingo Faustino Sarmiento and Julio Argentino Roca. These theses are well considered and argued, though again will no doubt provoke debate. The accounts of political developments are clear...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (4): 650–651.
Published: 01 November 1964
... of the History of San Diego written by Richard F. Pourade, editor-emeritus of the local newspaper, the Union . The previous works, The Explorers and Time of the Bells , were published in 1960 and 1961, respectively. Though the author has made little effort to restrict himself to a narrow history of the San...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1993) 73 (3): 540–541.
Published: 01 August 1993
... book that, though not entirely without merit, lacks clear purpose and coherent organization. Though one might reasonably gather from the title that this would be Henry Stimson’s account of his role in implementing U.S. policy in Nicaragua in the 1920s, the material written by that patrician-diplomat...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1995) 75 (1): 128–129.
Published: 01 February 1995
... of monographs. Now the historiographical progression has logically reached the microhistorical level. Daniel Nugent’s book adds another nuance to our picture of rural Mexico. Nugent’s “anthropological history” makes a significant contribution to Mexican ethnography. Its narrative exposition is clear, though...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1968) 48 (4): 742–743.
Published: 01 November 1968
..., tax, and property law, even though he might already be acquainted with many portions. The book treats such diverse areas of law as the status of nationality, the fuction of contracts, marriage and divorce, legitimacy of children, wills, bankruptcy, patents, and maritime and air laws. We find...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1994) 74 (2): 354–355.
Published: 01 May 1994
...Charles A. Hale Escalante’s title, Imaginary Citizens , signals the second challenge. In the absence of the citizens envisioned by liberal theorists, idealized civic morality (as opposed to functional public morality) could not develop. Though Escalante regards liberal ideas (however defined...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1964) 44 (2): 214–218.
Published: 01 May 1964
... closely in production figures. Guatemala’s production during the last decades of the eighteenth century was from 1,200,000 to 1,500,000 pounds and was valued at about 1,250,000 pesos (almost $2,000,000.00). Venezuela’s output of indigo during the same period was nearly 1,000,000 pounds. 1 Though...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1999) 79 (1): 186–187.
Published: 01 February 1999
... and twentieth centuries, Langley promises “a portrait of hemispheric political culture,” the consequences of which he has illuminated in his many other works. Indeed, he dedicates the volume to Walter LaFeber. Though he says nothing about the twentieth-century Central American revolutions LaFeber described...