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texcoco

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 726–727.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Barbara E. Mundy Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 This book brings together the work of 12 scholars on the important central Mexican city-state (or altepetl ) of Texcoco. It is well known to historians of pre-Hispanic and colonial Mexico as one of the three altepeme...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2008) 88 (4): 573–606.
Published: 01 November 2008
...Patricia Lopes Don Copyright 2008 by Duke University Press 2008 The 1539 Inquisition and Trial of Don Carlos of Texcoco in Early Mexico Patricia Lopes Don The inquisition, trial, and burning of the indigenous leader Don Carlos Ometochtli Chichimecateuctli of Texcoco...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 41–71.
Published: 01 February 2012
...Matthew Vitz Lake Texcoco, located on the eastern edge of Mexico City, had dried significantly during the nineteenth century, a process furthered by the Great Drainage Canal, completed in 1900. Although city boosters praised the canal for having eliminated Texcoco’s floods, dust storms arising from...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 509–511.
Published: 01 August 2015
... on items and imagery of rank and nobility for decades to come, and both the author and the University Press of Colorado deserve plaudits for its publication. A fourth point that Olko emphasizes is that while it is difficult to reconstruct local iconographic traditions beyond those of Texcoco and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2017) 97 (3): 543–545.
Published: 01 August 2017
...—documents the social effects of an important archive. The archive in question was the manuscripts belonging to don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl (ca. 1578–1650), who, on his mother's side, was a member of the indigenous ruling family of Texcoco, one of the three city-states that once made up the Aztec...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 1–3.
Published: 01 February 2012
... Mexico’s progress and modernity, the Díaz dictatorship undertook an even more elaborate drainage project, the Gran Canal del Desagüe. Com- pleted in 1900, the canal was largely successful in draining Lake Texcoco; but in so doing, it created a new array of problems and challenges. Fed by streams and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2012) 92 (1): 5–39.
Published: 01 February 2012
... River into Lake Zumpango during that season. The goal at the time was to desiccate the lowest lake around the city, Lake Texcoco, by severing it from a great source of floodwater. Water from the Cuautitlán River was stored in the western half of Lake Zumpango (Citlaltepec), runoff and excess from...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2012) 92 (4): 775–790.
Published: 01 November 2012
..., 336 Kurnick, Sarah (R), 178 Lacueva Muñoz, Jaime J., La plata del Rey y de sus vasallos: Minería y metalurgia en México (siglos XVI y XVII), 552 “‘The Lands with Which We Shall Struggle’: Land Reclamation, Revolution, and Development in Mexico’s Lake Texcoco Basin, 1910 – 1950,” by...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2006) 86 (3): 467–500.
Published: 01 August 2006
..., organización territorial y comunidad de los pueblos de Texcoco, 1812 – 1857” (tesis doctoral, El Colegio de México, 2003); Daniela Marino, “La modernidad a juicio: Los pueblos de Huixquilucan en la transición jurídica. Estado de México, 1856 – 1910” (tesis doctoral, El Colegio de México, en preparación...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2008) 88 (4): 607–638.
Published: 01 November 2008
... Juan Mexico City, 1 in Santiago Tlatelolco, 1 in Tacuba, 1 in Texcoco, and 1 in the Villa de Guadalupe.13 In a regional pattern of devotion, Mexico City and its environs were dis- tinguished predominantly by devotion to the Virgin Mary. In contrast, com- munities in the surrounding provinces...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 303–336.
Published: 01 May 2019
..., and limited public transportation. Built on the nearly dry Texcoco lake bed, the municipality experienced inadequate drainage during the rainy season, when the neighborhood periodically flooded. Meanwhile, during the dry season residents were assailed by dust storms. They were also embroiled in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 1–41.
Published: 01 February 2018
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2005) 85 (4): 555–594.
Published: 01 November 2005
... masculinity. Through his discursive critique of effeminacy, Muñoz Camargo attempts to reclaim Tlaxcalan masculinity. Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl, a historian of Texcoco with a complex mes- tizo/indigenous identity, wrote signifi cantly later than Tezozomoc and had even stronger Hispanic infl...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2000) 80 (1): 43–76.
Published: 01 February 2000
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2010) 90 (3): 423–454.
Published: 01 August 2010
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2013) 93 (1): 33–65.
Published: 01 February 2013
...- tile conditions, with winds and mineral salts blowing off Lake Texcoco, in a building without foundations (as workers had discovered during an attempt to protect the shrine with a masonry wall 25 years earlier).25 Though residents of the barrio had repainted the image, he noted, the face and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2014) 94 (4): 547–579.
Published: 01 November 2014
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 573–604.
Published: 01 November 2018
... of this came on November 30, 1539, when Zumárraga had don Carlos Ometochtli, ruler of Texcoco, publicly burned at the stake. Deeply convinced that the native nobility should receive a very powerful message, the bishop chose the most feared sentence for don Carlos, relajación al brazo seglar . This...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2000) 80 (1): 1–42.
Published: 01 February 2000
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2005) 85 (3): 375–416.
Published: 01 August 2005