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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2003) 83 (1): 154–155.
Published: 01 February 2003
...Miles Richardson Doing Fieldwork: The Correspondence of Robert Redfield and Sol Tax. Edited by robert a. rubinstein. Foreword by lisa redfield peattie. New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction, 2002. Photographs. Maps. Notes. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. xxix, 354 pp. Paper, $29.95. 2003 by Duke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2009) 89 (2): 253–283.
Published: 01 May 2009
...José Antonio Sánchez Román This article analyzes Minister Víctor Molina's 1924 income tax proposal, one of the first attempts to introduce this tax in Argentina, and explores the reasons for its failure. Argentine governments did not show a permanent commitment to fiscal reform during the 1920...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2014) 94 (2): 237–269.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Doug Yarrington The transition from tax farming to the direct bureaucratic administration of taxation, long recognized as a critical phase in the formation of centralized states, has received little consideration in studies of Latin America. Analysis of this fiscal transition can yield insights...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 211–218.
Published: 01 May 2008
...-century empires. Nonetheless, numerous facets of the essay run counter to the findings of many historians who have laboriously reconstructed the Bourbon tax system in Spanish America. A reading of the historical literature produced over the last two decades suggests that while political negotiations...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 219–233.
Published: 01 May 2008
..., absolutist sovereigns were not autocrats. They needed money to wage war and defend against predatory rivals, and had to exchange rent-generating privileges and monopolies in order to levy taxes and borrow. Irigoin and Grafe understate, however, the differences between fiscal relations in the British and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 148–149.
Published: 01 February 2017
... © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 Focused on the state of Michoacán, Jorge Silva Riquer's compilation on the history of Mexico's public finance ministry ( hacienda pública ) significantly enhances our knowledge of revenue generation, tax collection, and state bureaucracies in the region. The...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2009) 89 (2): 207–208.
Published: 01 May 2009
... revised as a result. Accord- ing to Adamovsky, it is only after the 1920s that the UCR discursively referred to the middle class, a social group that it helped to constitute as much as it represented. José Antonio Sánchez Román’s study of tax reform in Argentina offers another revisionist...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 173–209.
Published: 01 May 2008
.... Much of the more recent research on Spain’s political and constitutional setup results from studies that have examined the clearest link that exists between the various participants of the early modern political game, namely the state’s tax regime. When looking at the way in which political...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 235–245.
Published: 01 May 2008
... required the co-optation of and more often the initiative from local elites.4 Marichal cites Scarlett O’Phelan Godoy to argue that the repeated episodes of protest and open revolt witnessed in eighteenth-century Spanish colonies were tax revolts caused by resentment against the mita, alcabalas...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 773–775.
Published: 01 November 2018
... States undermined Mexican sovereignty in subtler but still damaging ways. In the 1920s foreign oil companies resisted the Mexican government's attempts to apply the 1917 constitution and charge them taxes, while Washington kept alive the threat of military intervention. In more recent history, US...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 362–363.
Published: 01 May 2018
.... He was a gangster imperialist, who ordered assassinations and avoided paying taxes with impunity. He was a gray eminence at the core of the widespread corruption that plagued Mexican politics and business. Jenkins and his wife Mary arrived in Mexico seeking their fortune in 1901. He held a series...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2008) 88 (3): 361–391.
Published: 01 August 2008
... San Juan, paying $7.00 in taxes. The following year, 107 muleteers traveled, including a woman named Carmen Cobos, who paid $2.00 in taxes. Like the cattle industry, commercial activities almost completely excluded women. Men owned all the shops registered in...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2001) 81 (1): 1–44.
Published: 01 February 2001
... effect on working-class morale, generating dependency and alienation. The lottery, in particular, was viewed as a tax on imbecility, a revenue collected through deception from the poor that went to enrich the coffers of the church (part of the revenue...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 195–228.
Published: 01 May 2015
.... The aljama was a corporate structure invented to provide its members with Islamic law (or Jewish law, as the Jewish corporate institution was called by the same name) within the framework of Christian hegemony and also to collect the various taxes and tributes to the crown and the church required to...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 404–406.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the twentieth. Their approach to tracing wheat shows the tremendous integration of world trade before World War I, when Europe imported its grains according to the harvest seasons in different parts of the world. The authors note the role of governments in subsidizing and using taxes and...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 746–748.
Published: 01 November 2016
... the most part, “were settled locally and usually without armed conflict” (p. 15). The region's tensions, however, went out of control between 1855 and 1857 as a result of liberal initiatives to privatize communal lands and increase taxes on goods transiting through the state, whose enactment required...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 748–749.
Published: 01 November 2016
... triumphant Liberals enacted and then enforced laws that broke up the collective landholdings so important to the pueblos. Under the Restored Republic (1867–1876) and then the Porfiriato (1877–1911), the Liberals (totally going against their once fierce defense of local autonomy) vastly tightened tax...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 503–504.
Published: 01 August 2014
...' efforts to influence colonial programs. Caciques shaped the debates and policies regarding the perpetuity of the encomiendas, actively opposed the tax policies accompanying the introduction of corregidores , and systematically rejected being resettled far from their fields and ayllu lands. Overall...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 542–543.
Published: 01 August 2014
.... Exploring similar themes, Claudia Herrera and Ferraro examine the opposition between a political culture of clientelism and efforts to create a modern “tax culture” in Argentina and Spain (p. 157). Iván Jaksić's study of Andrés Bello's contribution to the development of educational institutions and civil...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 384–386.
Published: 01 May 2015
... reexporting their goods to other European nations and had to develop sophisticated credit mechanisms to deal with long-distance trade. It also meant that governments had to reorganize their tax systems to allow Asian and American goods to be reexported. This trade became more intense over time, and by the end...