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tabasco

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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2016) 96 (2): 373–374.
Published: 01 May 2016
...J. R. McNeill The River People in Flood Time: The Civil Wars in Tabasco, Spoiler of Empires . By Rugeley Terry . Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press , 2014 . Photographs. Map. Figures. Notes. Bibliography. Index. viii, 355 pp. Cloth , $45.00 . Copyright © 2016 by Duke...
Image
Published: 01 August 2014
Figure 1. Tabasco, southern Yucatan, Petén, and Belize, drawn in 1806. Paired archivally with figure 2 . Archivo General de Indias, Seville, Mapas y Planos-México 496. Figure 1. Tabasco, southern Yucatan, Petén, and Belize, drawn in 1806. Paired archivally with figure 2. Archivo General de More
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 635–667.
Published: 01 November 2018
... Tabasco who was promoted to archbishop of Mexico after the signing. 3 In contrast, we suggest, the Arreglos were also made possible experientially, by prior engagement between lower echelons of public and ecclesiastical officialdom, each of which conducted public, verifiable, and choreographed...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2017) 97 (2): 223–258.
Published: 01 May 2017
... in Tabasco in 1925 in obtaining the franchise at the state level inspired Emélida Carrillo, a schoolteacher like María de Jesús Váldez, to petition the Sonoran State Congress directly for the right to vote in March 1925. 34 Unlike Váldez eight years earlier, however, Carrillo took a rhetorical...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2014) 94 (3): 381–419.
Published: 01 August 2014
...Figure 1. Tabasco, southern Yucatan, Petén, and Belize, drawn in 1806. Paired archivally with figure 2 . Archivo General de Indias, Seville, Mapas y Planos-México 496. Figure 1. Tabasco, southern Yucatan, Petén, and Belize, drawn in 1806. Paired archivally with figure 2. Archivo General de...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2015) 95 (4): 559–594.
Published: 01 November 2015
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2004) 84 (1): 83–112.
Published: 01 February 2004
... comfortably. Since colonial times, Quetzaltecos traded their crafts and crops as far north as Tabasco and as far south as El Salvador. Long before it was the high- land coffee capital, Quetzaltenango served as the commercial hub of a vibrant regional economy and an important stop on the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2006) 86 (1): 29–60.
Published: 01 February 2006
... fueron seguidos de lejos por Puebla (5 por ciento), Tabasco (4 por ciento), Coahuila (4 por ciento) y Tamaulipas (3 por ciento). Para explicar la política de expulsión, es necesario además considerar que esa política se articulaba con la conducta de Hispanofobia y revolución...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2006) 86 (1): 61–92.
Published: 01 February 2006
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2010) 90 (2): 215–245.
Published: 01 May 2010
... President Díaz. Such was the case of a José Santos Pardo, who wanted to send an “idol” from La Venta, Tabasco, to the “honorable Mr. Presi- dent of the Republic, in appreciation for the peace that he has forged, which has brought us so much good and progress.”55 Others chose to sell the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2018) 98 (4): 669–706.
Published: 01 November 2018
... Obregón, who became president of Mexico in 1920. But in January 1924, when another Constitutionalist general, Adolfo de la Huerta, launched a military uprising against Obregón, Alvarado led his forces in Tabasco into the rebellion. When Yucatán was invaded by delahuertista forces, Carrillo Puerto paid...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2017) 97 (1): 29–61.
Published: 01 February 2017
... centuries, though demographic recovery in the eighteenth century meant that colonial Yucatan always had a Maya majority. 6 In 1789, Indians in Yucatan (including Tabasco) numbered 264,955, compared to 53,866 Spaniards and mestizos and 45,201 Afro-Yucatecans (blacks and mulattoes). 7 Due to the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2004) 84 (1): 37–82.
Published: 01 February 2004
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2017) 97 (4): 613–649.
Published: 01 November 2017
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 173–209.
Published: 01 May 2008
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2007) 87 (3): 573–574.
Published: 01 August 2007
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2007) 87 (3): 574–576.
Published: 01 August 2007
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2005) 85 (4): 697–698.
Published: 01 November 2005
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2005) 85 (4): 698–699.
Published: 01 November 2005
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2007) 87 (3): 576–577.
Published: 01 August 2007