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Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2008) 88 (4): 706–707.
Published: 01 November 2008
...John S. Leiby The Treasure of the San José: Death at Sea in the War of the Spanish Succession . By carla rahn phillips. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2007. Illustrations. Maps. Tables. Appendixes. Notes. Bibliography. Index. xiii, 258 pp. Cloth, $35.00. Copyright 2008 by Duke...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 445–468.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Steven Palmer The paper reassesses the model of scientific success on the periphery advanced in Nancy Leys Stepan's analysis of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute in Beginnings of Brazilian Science by looking at a comparable, though ultimately less successful, bacteriological research facility in Havana...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2015) 95 (3): 427–458.
Published: 01 August 2015
...Hendrik Kraay Abstract This article examines the pre-Lenten festivities labeled entrudo in early nineteenth-century Rio de Janeiro and traces the efforts to repress them, which enjoyed a measure of success by the mid-1850s. During this period, the predominant form of pre-Lenten revelry involved...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2009) 89 (3): 471–499.
Published: 01 August 2009
... indigenous men and women who utilized these terms had accumulated some of the social markers of colonial success—real estate, slaves, imported clothing, language, religion—and while they may have been few in number and unlikely to turn their world upside down, they saw themselves as having achieved according...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 211–218.
Published: 01 May 2008
... historians but are downplayed in the essay under discussion. Similarly, it is important to note that most recent historical studies demonstrate that the fiscal reforms carried out by the Bourbon regime throughout Spanish America were much more homogeneous and successful in extracting a rapidly rising level...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2015) 95 (2): 299–334.
Published: 01 May 2015
... state was surprisingly successful in mobilizing and retaining soldiers as it faced the formidable challenges of modern mass warfare. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press 2015 Drawing on ideas of positivist social hygiene, Bolivian leaders had implemented obligatory military service at the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2008) 88 (3): 393–426.
Published: 01 August 2008
... illuminates the many ways in which women participated directly and indirectly in the construction of the nation-state and a capitalist economy, revealing how they negotiated elite efforts at gender, ethnic, and class containment in a provincial setting. The article attributes Romero's success to her political...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2015) 95 (1): 71–102.
Published: 01 February 2015
... action from the most marginalized rural and urban sectors of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and La Guajira region. Soon they constituted a new entrepreneurial class whose profile as successful merchants was articulated as a regional masculine identity found in popular expressions such as vallenato...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2010) 90 (1): 41–74.
Published: 01 February 2010
... culture and identity. In this way, indigenous women's dress and adornment are associated with the dramatic changes brought about by the new mercantile economy introduced by the Spaniards. Indian women who resettled in the city and gained economic success pursuing mercantile trades adopted distinctive...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2008) 88 (2): 169–171.
Published: 01 May 2008
...Richard J. Salvucci Cliometrics, the union of history and economics, has impressive successes to its credit. But it also displays a worrisome disregard for historical nuance, sometimes to the point of caricature. “Bargaining for Absolutism” by Alejandra Irigoin and Regina Grafe looks at this...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2009) 89 (4): 573–602.
Published: 01 November 2009
..., internationally demonstrated competence in campaigns against tropical disease, and participation in multilateral health agreements. The council came to command a central role in the regime of Porfirio Díaz (1877–1911), mainly because this international strategy enabled a successful defense of Mexican sovereignty...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2012) 92 (3): 403–436.
Published: 01 August 2012
...-right intellectuals and organizations that had considerable influence in successive military administrations and worked to define subversion—the military state’s ever-invoked enemy—in terms chiefly moral and sexual. Scholars have noted that defense of “Western Christian civilization” peppered the vague...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2011) 91 (2): 271–298.
Published: 01 May 2011
... relatively successful in securing posts after independence. In terms of subsequent offices held, the handful of creole audiencia ministers that emigrated to Spain fared better than the peninsulars that remained in the newly independent states. The author thanks Professors Andrew Hurley, Lyman L...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 August 2011) 91 (3): 469–502.
Published: 01 August 2011
... the relationship flourish. The article emphasizes the national dimensions in the success or otherwise of the RF's agenda in international health. I want to thank especially Julia Rodriguez and Ann Zulawski for proposing this special issue of the Hispanic American Historical Review and all the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2011) 91 (4): 633–663.
Published: 01 November 2011
... vulnerable to accusations of uncleanliness and ancestral shame. Yet successful or not, indigenous participation in the discourse of limpieza helped influence what it meant in New Spain to be “honorable” and “pure,” and therefore eligible for social mobility. This article benefited greatly from the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 362–363.
Published: 01 May 2018
... Successful foreign-owned enterprises in Mexico during the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz, the revolution, and the postrevolutionary era depended on six factors: having enough capital to purchase necessary equipment and pay for daily operations, skilled management, a steady market for products, accessible...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 November 2016) 96 (4): 733–734.
Published: 01 November 2016
... contrast the indigenous “moral economy” against an Atlantic-oriented production model championed by Spanish bureaucrats, administrators, and clerics, who regarded their success as dependent on the reproduction of Spanish “policía” (Spanish language, religion, customs, and residence patterns) among the...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 February 2018) 98 (1): 149–151.
Published: 01 February 2018
... erudite political, diplomatic, and military history, Storrs examines the first half of the eighteenth century, which corresponds to the reign of Philip V. The narrative begins with the aftermath of the War of the Spanish Succession, which resulted in the replacement of the Hapsburg by the Bourbon dynasty...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2018) 98 (2): 342–343.
Published: 01 May 2018
... from her early presence in vaudeville to her success at the Urca Casino. Years before her Hollywood success, Carmen Miranda and the Bando da Lua were some of the most important artists of Latin American popular music. Carmen's success abroad seems to have been based on the fact that the American...
Journal Article
Hispanic American Historical Review (1 May 2019) 99 (2): 363–364.
Published: 01 May 2019
... experiences with the Inquisition that he saw the rejection of traditional ways as crucial to successful conversion of indigenous peoples, two central ideas that he brought with him to Alta California. The book is an important contribution to our understanding of the mind of Serra, his role in the development...